Loading...
  • organic foods
  • Prior to the last meeting of the National Organic Standards, Medical Researcher Dr. Joanne Tobacman provide the board with expert testimony detailing her independent research into the health impacts of the use of the controversial additive carrageenan in organic foods. (cornucopia.org)
  • effects
  • I am a physician-scientist at the University of Illinois College of Medicine who has been studying the effects of carrageenan in human cells and in animal models for almost two decades. (cornucopia.org)
  • With collaborators, I have published 18 peer-reviewed papers that address the biological effects of carrageenan. (cornucopia.org)
  • The same potent chemical effects that change the texture of processed foods can lead to harmful biological effects in human cells and in animals exposed to carrageenan. (cornucopia.org)
  • possible human carcinogen
  • This raises concerns, since degraded carrageenan is classified as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B) by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). (greenerchoices.org)
  • Degraded carrageenan is classified as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. (berkeleywellness.com)
  • The International Agency for Research on Cancer recognizes degraded carrageenan as a "possible human carcinogen," based on research showing that it leads to higher rates of colon cancer in lab animals. (truthaboutpetfood.com)
  • In fact, non-food safe carrageenan was listed as a "possible human carcinogen" by the World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer in 1983. (happy-mothering.com)
  • poligeenan
  • Degraded" carrageenan, a.k.a. "poligeenan," is extracted by boiling it in much stronger acid "like battery acid" for long periods to reduce it to a small molecule, says William Matakas, seaweed platform marketing manager for ingredient supplier FMC. (newhope.com)
  • She and others note that many oft-cited studies used degraded carrageenan (poligeenan) in lab animals not people. (newhope.com)
  • This "natural" food ingredient can be transformed in acid to poligeenan or "degraded" carrageenan. (bewell.com)
  • harmful
  • We had known for decades that it had harmful effects on laboratory animals, but in 2008 the first study on human cells to "suggest that carrageenan exposure may have a role in development of human intestinal pathology" was conducted. (care2.com)
  • Some researchers advise consumers to select food products without carrageenan, accusing the FDA of "ignoring [its] harmful potential. (care2.com)
  • The same potent chemical effects that change the texture of processed foods can lead to harmful biological effects in human cells and in animals exposed to carrageenan. (cornucopia.org)
  • If scientific evidence using animal studies and cell studies strongly points to harmful effects, as is the case with carrageenan, the NOSB should err on the side of caution and protect the safety and health of consumers. (greenerchoices.org)
  • They say there's no evidence that carrageenan breaks down into a harmful form in people. (berkeleywellness.com)
  • exposure
  • A more recent paper published found that the exposure to carrageenan may compromise the effectiveness of treatments, even the body's own natural defenses for disease. (truthaboutpetfood.com)
  • These findings demonstrate that exposure to CGN (carrageenan) drives TNF-α-stimulated cells toward inflammation rather than toward apoptotic cell death and suggest that CGN exposure may compromise the effectiveness of anti-TNF-α therapy. (truthaboutpetfood.com)
  • In other words, this study found exposure to carrageenan causes infected cells to inflame rather than to die as part of the body's natural healing process. (truthaboutpetfood.com)
  • In 2014, researchers showed that exposure of human colonic epithelial cells in culture and of mouse colonic epithelium in vivo to low concentrations of carrageenan activated the Wnt/[beta]-catenin signaling pathway, leading to increases in nuclear p-catenin, T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor activation, and cyclin D1 expression. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • viscosity
  • 4. The toothpaste composition of claim 1 wherein the toothpaste viscosity builder is selected from the group consisting of refined carrageenan, and carboxy methyl cellulose. (google.es)
  • 7. The toothpaste composition of claim 1 wherein the toothpaste viscosity builder is a combination viscosity builder comprising refined carrageenan and ultra low viscosity guar gum. (google.es)
  • 2 (c), it was shown that the viscosity of papaya-wolfberry beverage increased as the carrageenan content increased, but this effect was not significant (pi1/4z0. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • iota
  • 3. The toothpaste composition of claim 1 wherein the binder formulation further comprises at least about 40% semi-refined iota carrageenan. (google.es)
  • food-grade
  • Today, two distinct varieties of carrageenan exist in U.S. manufacturing: Food-grade, or "undegraded," is extracted with heat, water, and mild acids and alkali. (newhope.com)
  • species
  • Although the Malayan word, 'agar-agar' refers to Eucheuma species it is now known that these yield carrageenans rather than agar-type polysaccharides. (fao.org)
  • It was not until the Eucheumas were recognized as valuable carrageenophytes by the western carrageenan industry that the large-scale export of these species became established. (fao.org)
  • Utilization of these not only has greatly extended the base, and the geographical area, from which the industry can draw raw materials, but also has extended the range of properties of their extractives, as different species yield carrageenans of differing structure and properties. (fao.org)
  • The most popular carrageenan species is harvested off the coasts of Ireland during warmer months. (ticgums.com)
  • The popular sources for Carrageenan are the ChondrusCripus, EucheumaCottonii and EucheumaSpinosum species. (freead1.net)
  • carcinogen
  • Degraded carrageenan is also listed as a possible carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer of the United Nations. (bewell.com)
  • widely
  • Carrageenan is widely used in dairy products because it forms complexes with calcium and milk proteins. (scitoys.com)
  • Carrageenan is a widely used food additive that is obtained from certain types of red seaweed. (greenerchoices.org)
  • More worrisome, undegraded carrageenan - the type that is widely used in foods - has been associated with malignancies and other stomach problems. (drweil.com)
  • Despite such findings, carrageenan is still approved by the US Food and Drug Administration as an additive and remains widely used in many food products. (drweil.com)
  • Carrageenan is widely used in the food industry for its ability to stabilize dairy products, provide texture and suspension in beverages and to form the gels that you find in puddings or bakery fillings. (ticgums.com)
  • So to wrap up, in this episode we were able to touch on a new category of gums as well as look at the beneficial characteristics of Carrageenan, one of the more widely known Seaweed Extracts. (ticgums.com)
  • NOSB
  • We argued that the NOSB should use the Precautionary Principle when making its decision on whether carrageenan meets the criteria in the law. (greenerchoices.org)
  • glucose intolerance
  • And she reported further that when laboratory mice are exposed to low concentrations of carrageenan for 18 days, they develop "profound" glucose intolerance and impaired insulin action, both of which can lead to diabetes . (drweil.com)
  • organics
  • The carrageenan trade lobby group fought back hard, and found allies in companies like Group Danone (Stonyfield), CROPP (Organic Valley), Dean Foods (Horizon and Silk), Hain Celestial (Earth's Best, Rice Dream and Westsoy) and Smucker's (Santa Cruz Organics and R.W. Knudsen). (cornucopia.org)
  • 2017
  • The Global Carrageenan Industry 2017 Market Research Report is a professional and in-depth study on the current state of the Carrageenan industry. (ne.jp)
  • aqueous
  • In the original method - the only one used until the late 1970s-early 1980s - the carrageenan is extracted from the seaweed into an aqueous solution, the seaweed residue is removed by filtration and then the carrageenan is recovered from the solution, eventually as a dry solid containing little else than carrageenan. (fao.org)
  • agar
  • The processor now has a clear solution of carrageenan and there are two methods for recovering it as a solid, both rather similar to those described previously for agar production. (fao.org)
  • Learn more about our Carrageenan and Agar products. (ticgums.com)
  • Tobacman
  • Prior to the last meeting of the National Organic Standards, Medical Researcher Dr. Joanne Tobacman provide the board with expert testimony detailing her independent research into the health impacts of the use of the controversial additive carrageenan in organic foods. (cornucopia.org)
  • concern
  • In 2008 I raised a concern about carrageenan. (care2.com)
  • In fact, in 2015, the Joint Expert Committee of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations and World Health Organization on Food Additives announced that carrageenan was "not of concern" when used in infant formula at concentrations up to 1000 milligrams per liter-even though the European Union has banned it for this use. (drweil.com)
  • This week I was asked by one if the carrageenan in her almond milk was a concern. (bewell.com)
  • concentrations
  • In this study carrageenan-gelatin (natural polymers) cryogels were synthesized by using glutaraldehyde and 1-ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride and N -hydroxysuccinimide (EDC-NHS) as crosslinking agent at optimum concentrations. (hindawi.com)
  • Irish
  • 1985). While not all of these have been, or are perhaps likely to be, exploited commercially, present-day sources of carrageenans go well beyond the original Irish moss. (fao.org)
  • products
  • When applied, carrageenan is capable of enhancing the permeability and effectiveness of certain skincare formulations and moisturizing products, such as lotions and creams, as well as provide a smoother, creamier texture. (lorealparisusa.com)
  • Please note that all brands listed with an asterisk ( * ) supply products both with and without carrageenan. (cornucopia.org)
  • The prolonged scientific research and tests and the recent campaign for organicalness has criticised the usage of carrageenan in food products. (rememberthemothers.net)
  • To provide customers with the benefits of this improved functionality, a new family of carrageenan products has been brought to the market, forming the Satiagel[TM] range for the dairy market. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • symptoms
  • The National Institutes of Health is now funding a human trial looking at whether a carrageenan-free diet can improve colitis symptoms. (newhope.com)