• Materials and methods: We investigated the utility of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (hscTnT), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide, cardiac troponin T and I, and creatine kinase (CK)-MB in cancer patients receiving anthracycline-based chemotherapy, in order to determine whether baseline levels or changes in these biomarkers may help predict the onset of congestive heart failure. (umn.edu)
  • Better tools need to be identified to predict cardiac complications of anthracycline chemotherapy. (umn.edu)
  • Conclusion: Elevations in baseline hscTnT levels are suggestive of an oncology subgroup at high risk of developing cardiac complications from their chemotherapy. (umn.edu)
  • Myocardial ischemia, also called cardiac ischemia, reduces the heart muscle's ability to pump blood. (mayoclinic.org)
  • The rhythm of the heart is set by a small region of cardiac muscle cells in the right atrium called the sinoatrial (SA) node that acts as a spontaneous pacemaker, but is under the control of nerves and circulating hormones that affect the heart rate via a host of control circuits that maintain adequate blood pressure and oxygenation. (scholarpedia.org)
  • Cardiac MRI helps your health care provider see detailed pictures of your heart and blood vessels. (medlineplus.gov)
  • These deposits can cause thickening of different sections of the heart, leading to decreased cardiac function . (wikipedia.org)
  • Deposits in the extracellular cardiac space can stiffen the heart, resulting in restriction of the ventricles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac muscle cells are striated muscle cells that are responsible for heart contraction. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • We believe that caregivers play a key role and can enhance the recovery and well-being of patients after cardiac surgery or after a recent diagnosis of a cardiac illness such as a heart attack or heart failure. (bmj.com)
  • Cardiac output , in human physiology, volume of blood expelled by either ventricle of the heart . (britannica.com)
  • Cardiac rehabilitation is a comprehensive exercise, education, and behavioral modification program designed to improve the physical and emotional condition of patients with heart disease . (encyclopedia.com)
  • Heart attack survivors, bypass and angioplasty patients, and individuals with angina, congestive heart failure, and heart transplants are all candidates for a cardiac rehabilitation program. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Blood pressure is carefully monitored before and after exercise sessions, and patients are taught how to measure their heart rate and evaluate any possible cardiac symptoms during each session. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cardiac patients who smoke are twice as likely to have a heart attack in the following five years than non-smoking patients. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The risks of another heart attack during cardiac rehabilitation are slight, and greatly reduced by careful, continuous monitoring of the physical status of the patient. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The outcome of the cardiac rehabilitation program depends on a number of variables, including patient follow-through, type and degree of heart disease , and the availability of an adequate support network for the patient. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cardiac monitoring generally refers to continuous or intermittent monitoring of heart activity, generally by electrocardiography, with assessment of the patient's condition relative to their cardiac rhythm. (slideshare.net)
  • cardiac muscle Your heart beats about once a second for the whole of your life, and of course has no opportunity to rest. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The special requirements of the heart call for a special type of muscle, cardiac muscle , which is not found anywhere else in the body. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cardiac toxicity is damage to the heart by harmful chemicals. (nccn.org)
  • heart is known as the cardiac cycle. (britannica.com)
  • The cardiac cycle is defined as the time from the end of one heart contraction to the end of the subsequent contraction and consists of a period of relaxation called diastole followed by a period of contraction called systole. (britannica.com)
  • March 10, 2010 -- A large percentage of patients without known heart disease who undergo invasive cardiac catheterization to check for dangerous artery blockages do not have them, a new study suggests. (webmd.com)
  • Cardiac catheterization is performed to examine how well the heart and arteries are functioning. (webmd.com)
  • American Heart Association president Clyde Yancy, MD, agrees that such studies are needed, but he says it is not clear from the current research that too many cardiac catheterizations are being done. (webmd.com)
  • A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) investigators has found that activity of an important signaling pathway increases with aging and with heart failure and that inhibiting that pathway can improve cardiac function in mouse models. (massgeneral.org)
  • Attempts to reconstruct various parts of the heart started even before the beginning of open cardiac surgery. (worldcat.org)
  • Cardiac contusion is a misnomer that is used to reflect injury to the heart after blunt chest trauma. (nih.gov)
  • During cardiac catheterization, a long thin tube called a catheter is inserted in an artery or vein in your groin, neck or arm and threaded through your blood vessels to your heart. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Some heart disease treatments, such as coronary angioplasty and coronary stenting, also are done using cardiac catheterization. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Cardiac catheterization is done to see if you have a heart problem. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Cardiac catheterization is also used as part of some procedures to treat heart disease. (mayoclinic.org)
  • As with most procedures done on your heart and blood vessels, cardiac catheterization has some risks. (mayoclinic.org)
  • Incidence, predictors, and clinical outcomes of postoperative cardiac tamponade in patients undergoing heart valve surgery. (medscape.com)
  • Since she has a family history of heart disease, she decided to be proactive and visited cardiologist Dr. John M. Kennedy for a Cardiac CT. (thedoctorstv.com)
  • If a child needs heart surgery, our Division of Cardiac Surgery at Children's National is there to provide compassionate, world-class expertise. (childrensnational.org)
  • Cardiac (Heart) Surgery at Children's National: Why Choose Us? (childrensnational.org)
  • Cardiac catheterization is a procedure in which a heart specialist inserts a small tube (catheter) through a large blood vessel in the arm or leg, and then passes the tube into the heart. (womenshealthmag.com)
  • When the patient exhales and decompresses the heart, the heart's rate will dramatically slow because it has additional space to expand during ventricular filling time in the cardiac cycle. (nau.edu)
  • At Lawnwood, where an invasive diagnostic test known as a cardiac catheterization is performed, about half the procedures, or 1,200, were determined to have been done on patients without significant heart disease, according to a confidential 2010 review. (cnbc.com)
  • Cardiac stress tests, also called exercise or treadmill tests, are commonly used to find evidence of blockages in the arteries of the heart. (courant.com)
  • wherein the controller generates an electrical response in a heart by directing the ultrasound source to transmit a pulse or pulses of ultrasound to one or more locations in the heart on a periodic basis suitable for cardiac pacing, wherein said of ultrasound pulse or pulses are configured to include a rower level and duration suitable to induce an action potential in the heart. (google.com)
  • 2. A system according to claim 1 and including an injector which injects cardiac drugs into the bloodstream, wherein the controller changes a rate at which cardiac tissue absorbs the drugs by directing the ultrasound source to transmit a high enough power level of ultrasound to one or more locations in the heart. (google.com)
  • 13. A system according to claim 8 , wherein the controller additionally controls the ultrasound source to direct a high enough power level of ultrasound to one or more locations in the heart to kill cardiac tissue by heating. (google.com)
  • And then we looked at heart function using cardiac MRI, before they started anticancer treatment and then after, so we could see if the medication, the preventive medication, had an effect. (medscape.com)
  • The researchers categorized participants into the "surgery" group if they reported having undergone cardiac surgery (regardless of whether they reported having undergone cardiac catheterization) or into the "catheterization" group if they reported having undergone cardiac catheterization but not heart surgery. (medscape.com)
  • We selected cardiac catherization as a control because it is usually performed because of significant heart disease, yet does not require general anesthesia, ICU recovery, and a lengthy hospital stay," Whitlock explained. (medscape.com)
  • Cardiac catheterizations can help cardiologists diagnose and treat many different heart problems. (kidshealth.org)
  • Cardiac catheterizations are an important way to diagnose and treat heart problems. (kidshealth.org)
  • Thor Sundt, MD, is the Churchill Professor of Surgery, chief of the Division of Cardiac Surgery and director of the Corrigan Minehan Heart Center. (massgeneral.org)
  • You just viewed Cardiac Anomalies/Congenital Heart... . (merlot.org)
  • If you have a massive heart attack, almost everyone would agree you should undergo cardiac catheterization," Dr. Deepak Bhatt, who directs the Integrated Interventional Cardiovascular Program at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, told ABCNews.com. (go.com)
  • Although invasive heart procedures can be lifesaving and worth the risk for patients who have heart disease, patients who don't need cardiac catheterization or stents are exposed to unnecessary risks before and after surgery. (go.com)
  • But unneeded cardiac procedures can cause strokes, heart attacks and death. (go.com)
  • Although a causal association between vaccination and adverse cardiac events in the civilian population is unproven, as a precautionary measure, CDC recommends that persons with physician-diagnosed cardiac disease with or without symptoms (e.g., previous myocardial infarction, angina, congestive heart failure, or cardiomyopathy) be excluded from vaccination during this smallpox preparedness program. (cdc.gov)
  • Though the rate of cardiac disease is highest in developed countries, developing countries are seeing an increase in the occurrence of cardiac disease, as well as a corresponding rise in the number of heart-related deaths. (wikinvest.com)
  • Cardiac (or cardiovascular) disease refers to any condition affecting the ability of the heart and/or blood vessels to function properly. (wikinvest.com)
  • A Stress Cardiac MRI is performed to help evaluate the blood flow in the heart arteries, looking for blockages. (nationaljewish.org)
  • Since its creation in 1995, the organization 'Save a Child's Heart' has been improving the quality of cardiac care for children in developing countries who suffer from heart disease. (voanews.com)
  • Every three days, sudden cardiac death takes the life of a young U.S. athlete,' says Dr. Anthony Rossi, Medical Director of the Pediatric Cardiac Intensive Care Unit at Miami Children's Hospital, 'These young people often die without exhibiting advance signs of heart problems. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • The orifice by which the food enters is called the cardiac opening , because it is near the heart. (dictionary.com)
  • Cardiac rehabilitation is an important part of heart failure treatment. (webmd.com)
  • Cardiac-specific deletion of Yap impedes neonatal heart regeneration, resulting in a default fibrotic response. (pnas.org)
  • Conversely, forced expression of a constitutively active form of Yap in the adult heart stimulates cardiac regeneration and improves contractility after myocardial infarction. (pnas.org)
  • In addition to stem cell transplantation ( 2 , 3 ), recent studies have suggested strategies for repairing the adult heart through reprogramming of nonmyocytes to a cardiac cell fate using cardiogenic genes and small molecules ( 4 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ - 10 ). (pnas.org)
  • However, by 1 wk of life, the potential for heart regeneration is lost in mice and is replaced by a fibrotic response that generates scar tissue, which impedes regeneration and impairs cardiac contractility ( 13 ). (pnas.org)
  • Certain strains of the food pathogen Listeria are uniquely adapted to infect heart tissues and may put people at a higher risk from serious cardiac disease, according to a new study published in the Journal of Medical Microbiology. (redorbit.com)
  • In these cases death rate from cardiac illness is estimated to be up to 35% yet very little is known about how these bacteria infect heart tissues. (redorbit.com)
  • The results of the study suggest that these cardiac-associated strains display modified proteins on their surface that enable the bacteria to target the heart, leading to bacterial infection. (redorbit.com)
  • Patients with heart valve replacements or prior cardiac illness are believed to be more susceptible to Listeria cardiac infections. (redorbit.com)
  • Image Caption: Listeria monocytogenes cardiac-invasive strain replicating and moving within infected heart cells. (redorbit.com)
  • Implantable cardioverter defibrillators account for one-third of the decrease in cardiac arrests caused by ventricular fibrillation in North-Holland, according to research in Circulation, an American Heart Association journal. (redorbit.com)
  • However, the incidence of such cardiac arrests from other abnormal heart rhythms continues to increase each year. (redorbit.com)
  • It's unknown what caused the other two-thirds of decline in VF arrests or why cardiac arrests vs. other abnormal heart rhythms have increased. (redorbit.com)
  • NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Breathing in soot and other fine particles from the urban air may increase the risk of suffering a deadly heart stoppage, suggests a new study of more than 8,000 cardiac arrests in New York City. (reuters.com)
  • Cardiac hypertrophy happens when the muscles of the heart thicken, according to the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. (reference.com)
  • Cardiac hypertrophy is often caused by high blood pressure and a narrowing of the valves of the heart, claims the University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine. (reference.com)
  • Transradial cardiac catheterization is a procedure used to treat and diagnose certain heart conditions. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Healthcare providers also use cardiac catheterization to do other procedures on the heart. (hopkinsmedicine.org)
  • Cardiac preload stretches heart muscles, which are also known as cardiomyocytes, to their fullest extent depending on physiological demands. (reference.com)
  • Cardiac output refers to the volume of blood pumped out from the heart every minute. (reference.com)
  • Faster heart rates typically lead to greater cardiac output. (reference.com)
  • Cardiac muscle is a specialized muscle with high strength and endurance that is present only in the heart, says InnerBody. (reference.com)
  • Cardiac catheterization is a procedure that involves puncturing an artery and / or vein, usually located in the groin, so that a small, long, flexible tube (catheter) can be guided into the heart and major vessels around the heart. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • With cardiac catheterization, pressure measurements and blood samples can be obtained from the various cardiac chambers and blood vessels around the heart allowing calculations of detailed information about the heart's function. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • The catheterization is performed in the Cardiac Catheterization Suite of the Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children's. (cincinnatichildrens.org)
  • 5) In fact, according to the British Heart Foundation, the majority of cardiac arrests in the UK are caused by heart attacks. (news-medical.net)
  • Well, in contrast to cardiac arrests, heart attacks are generally caused by one main factor - coronary heart disease (CHD). (news-medical.net)
  • BioLife4D stated that the cardiac patch, created at a research facility in Houston, is derived from a patient's white blood cells and contains multiple cell types included in the human heart. (yahoo.com)
  • On June 16, 2009, a 50-year-old male paid call NIOSH offers the following recommendations to fire fighter responded to a structural fire on a hot reduce the risk of heart attacks and sudden cardiac and humid day. (cdc.gov)
  • SCA is responsible for as many as 20 percent of all deaths in the U.S., according to the study, and "50 percent of sudden cardiac deaths are first cardiac events, meaning the patient did not know they had heart disease,' Dr. Robert J. Myerburg, a professor at the University of Miami (Fla.) and a cardiologist said. (prweb.com)
  • Exacerbating the issue is that no two heart conditions are the same, as demonstrated by several young professional athletes who have suffered in-competition cardiac events. (prweb.com)
  • Further, various cardiovascular disorders such as stroke, rhythm disorders, congenital heart disease, subclinical atherosclerosis, and peripheral arterial disease are other major clinical complications increasing the need for cardiac prosthetic devices. (prnewswire.com)
  • however, heart valve implantation is directly associated with various complications which either way restrain the market growth of cardiac prosthetic devices. (prnewswire.com)
  • A physician may recommend cardiac imaging to support a diagnosis of a heart condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac catheterization (heart cath) is the insertion of a catheter into a chamber or vessel of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • Interventional cardiologists can also use cardiac catheterization to estimate the cardiac output, the amount of blood pumped by the heart per minute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cardiac catheterization requires the use of fluoroscopy to visualize the path of the catheter as it enters the heart or as it enters the coronary arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two major categories of cardiac catheterization: Left heart catheterization allows for direct intervention in cases of coronary artery occlusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Right heart catheterizations also allow the physician to estimate the cardiac output, the amount of blood that flows from the heart each minute, and the cardiac index, a hemodynamic parameter that relates the cardiac output to a patient's body surface area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Determination of cardiac output can be done by releasing a small amount of saline solution (either chilled or at room temperature) in one area of the heart and measuring the drop in blood temperature over time in another area of the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term is usually used to describe studies of such phenomena by invasive (intracardiac) catheter recording of spontaneous activity as well as of cardiac responses to programmed electrical stimulation (PES) . (wikipedia.org)
  • With cardiac arrests, every minute counts. (fraunhofer.de)
  • Previous studies have shown a gradual 15-year decrease in VF-related cardiac arrests suffered outside the hospital setting - from 54 percent to 38 percent in the United States and Europe. (redorbit.com)
  • Researchers estimated that ICDs prevented 81 cardiac arrests during the 2005-2008 study. (redorbit.com)
  • The annual incidence of VF cardiac arrests fell significantly, from 21.1 people per 100,000 to 17.4 people per 100,000. (redorbit.com)
  • Incidence of cardiac arrests related to other abnormal rhythms increased significantly, from 12.2 per 100,000 to 19.4 per 100,000 annually. (redorbit.com)
  • As the levels of particulate matter air pollution increased, more cardiac arrests occurred," lead researcher Dr. Robert A Silverman of the Long Island Jewish Medical Center, in New York, told Reuters Health in an e-mail. (reuters.com)
  • When cardiac arrests occur outside of the hospital, victims typically have less than eight percent chance of survival. (reuters.com)
  • So the team compared readings from air quality monitors around New York City with the records of 8,216 out-of-hospital cardiac arrests that happened between 2002 and 2006. (reuters.com)
  • Cardiac arrests have several potential causes. (news-medical.net)
  • This is the term trauma experts agree is more appropriate since it encompasses the various types of cardiac injuries seen after blunt chest trauma. (nih.gov)
  • Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) from blunt chest trauma is most commonly due to motor vehicle collisions (50%), with 20% of all motor vehicle collision deaths involving blunt chest trauma. (nih.gov)
  • The CardioInsight™ Noninvasive 3D Mapping System is a non-invasive mapping system that collects chest ECG signals and combines these signals with CT scan data to produce and display simultaneous, bi-atrial and biventricular, 3-D cardiac maps. (medtronic.com)
  • Symptoms of cardiac hypertrophy include chest pain or pressure after exercise or after meals, shortness of breath, tiredness, fainting, and palpitations, says WebMD. (reference.com)
  • Components of a cardiac rehabilitation program vary by individual clinical need, and each program will be carefully constructed for the patient by his or her rehabilitation team. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The thoroughly updated content takes into account recent developments in cardiac rehabilitation, and incorporates practical advice on how to use guidelines in clinical practice. (springer.com)
  • In the setting of blunt trauma, a high, clinical suspicion for BCI is warranted, and if suspicion is high enough, patients should be monitored for adverse sequelae since there are no pathognomonic clinical signs or symptoms that correlate with the risk of cardiac complications. (nih.gov)
  • Sagrista-Sauleda J, Angel J, Sambola A, Alguersuari J, Permanyer-Miralda G, Soler-Soler J. Low-pressure cardiac tamponade: clinical and hemodynamic profile. (medscape.com)
  • Clinical significance of histopathologic patterns of cardiac amyloidosis. (medscape.com)
  • Cardiac valve diseases are prevalent clinical problems, usually requiring prosthetic replacement. (google.com)
  • They're here to discuss their late-breaking clinical trial called PRADA [ 1 ] -the Prevention of Cardiac Dysfunction During Adjuvant Breast Cancer Therapy. (medscape.com)
  • This book is designed to present readers with comprehensive, high-quality research results on almost all aspects of this carcinoma in clinical management, from correct determination of the esophagogastric junction, issues on cardiac mucosa, epidemiology, and natural history, to clinical, endoscopic, and histopathologic features and diagnostic pitfalls of this carcinoma at both early and advanced stages. (worldcat.org)
  • Subsequently, clinical management of gastric cardiac carcinoma at advanced stages is discussed at length with a personalized, multidiscipline approach with strategies from surgical resections with various methods, to pre-, peri- and post-resection chemoradiation therapies as well as the most advanced immunotherapy. (worldcat.org)
  • These tests could be used to distinguish strains of Listeria isolated from food outbreaks, food processing plants, or from clinical infections that place patients at increased risk of cardiac disease," suggested Dr Freitag. (redorbit.com)
  • As consumer-based technology continues to improve and mature they will become a solution for clinical use," Long said, "and further automate cardiac detection and streamline diagnosis in real time, unlike traditional monitors. (prweb.com)
  • Here we report that mice bearing mutant alleles of Yap and its paralog WW domain containing transcription regulator 1 ( Taz ) exhibit gene dosage-dependent cardiac phenotypes, suggesting redundant roles of these Hippo pathway effectors in establishing proper myocyte number and maintaining cardiac function. (pnas.org)
  • Each intervention, promising lifesaving relief, was embraced with enthusiasm by cardiologists and cardiac surgeons-and both techniques often do provide rapid, dramatic reduction of the alarming pain associated with angina. (harvardmagazine.com)
  • Ethiopia, I believe, has two cardiologists for the entire country, but he would be the first Ethiopian cardiac surgeon," said Litwack. (voanews.com)
  • Because of the term's ambiguity in describing a spectrum of myocardial injuries secondary to blunt trauma, "cardiac contusion" is now termed "blunt cardiac injury" (BCI). (nih.gov)
  • [ 37 ] Diagnostic evaluation includes findings on physical examination in conjuction with results of cardiac biomarker studies, noninvasive tests, and myocardial biopsy (as needed). (medscape.com)
  • The seven adverse events of cardiac origin among civilian vaccinees include three myocardial infarctions, two cases of angina, and two cases of myopericarditis. (cdc.gov)
  • The patient was admitted to a cardiac intensive care unit with a diagnosis of myocardial infarction. (cdc.gov)
  • She was hospitalized with atrial fibrillation and had electrocardiographic changes and elevated cardiac enzymes consistent with subendocardial myocardial infarction. (cdc.gov)
  • Recent advances in the diagnosis and management of cardiac amyloidosis. (medscape.com)
  • We will review the history of cardiac care units, review the local history and discuss the current ACCU unit in Winnipeg, Manitoba. (umanitoba.ca)
  • Figure 3 shows the normal cardiac rhythm on an ECG, where the P wave is associated with the excitation of atria, the QRS complex is associated with the excitation of ventricles, and the T wave is associated with the relaxation of the ventricles. (scholarpedia.org)
  • 2. This Article Has Been Brought to You for Free by www.freud-sigmund.compropagation does not follow the normal Stored in both normal cardiac impulseroute. (slideshare.net)
  • Enhanced normal automaticity is best understood by beginning with a brief review of the physiology and hierarchy of stimulation of normal cardiac automaticity. (uptodate.com)
  • Acute management of complex cardiac injuries. (springer.com)
  • The incidence of blunt cardiac injury (BCI) has a broad range (8% to 76%) because of the lack of a clear, accepted diagnostic criteria, lack of consensus on the definition, and the inconsistency of nomenclature that makes it difficult to quantify the incidence. (nih.gov)
  • These two activities are associated with the highest incidence of sudden cardiac death. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • Enhanced cardiac automaticity refers to the accelerated generation of an action potential by either normal pacemaker tissue (enhanced normal automaticity) or by abnormal tissue within the myocardium (abnormal automaticity). (uptodate.com)
  • The discharge rate of normal or abnormal pacemakers may be accelerated by drugs, various forms of cardiac disease, reduction in extracellular potassium, or alterations of autonomic nervous system tone. (uptodate.com)
  • When a patient undergoes cardiac catheterization, a wire tube, or sheath, is inserted into the arteries in the patient's groin or wrist area (femoral or radial arteries). (go.com)
  • Cardiac care has expanded dramatically at Highland Hospital since its Interventional Services Lab, built with $2.6 million raised by the Alameda County Health Care Foundation, opened in May 2011. (cnbc.com)
  • It has been shown that grafting biocompatible patches onto the infarcted myocardium can improve cardiac tissue repair post ischemia. (yahoo.com)
  • coronary atherosclerosis and evolving cardiac ischemia and infarct" with fire fighting during Develop a comprehensive wellness/fitness hot weather as a contributing factor. (cdc.gov)
  • Keough V, Letizia M. Blunt cardiac injury in the elderly trauma patient. (springer.com)
  • Once discharged from the hospital, the patient works with his cardiac team to create an individual exercise plan. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Hindi Z. Rare purulent cardiac tamponade caused by Streptococcus constellatus in a young immunocompetent patient: case report and review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Does this patient with a pericardial effusion have cardiac tamponade? (medscape.com)
  • 3) The effect of early education on patient anxiety while waiting for elective cardiac catheterization. (medindia.net)
  • What is the average time for patient to stay in hospital on observation after cardiac Catheterization that is paid and covered by Horizon Blue Cross and other commercial insurance companies? (medindia.net)
  • A system for providing cardiac stimulation to a patient includes an implantable stimulation device with a microprocessor and a separate programmer. (google.ca)
  • In fact, we are the only center in the region to guarantee that a specialized pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist will be available for your child at all times. (childrensnational.org)
  • The group plans to train Ethiopia's first pediatric cardiac surgeon, and its efforts to raise money for a boy named Eliyas. (voanews.com)
  • Equally important is that we have started training what would be Ethiopia's first pediatric cardiac surgeon. (voanews.com)
  • Marcolini EG, Keegan J. Blunt Cardiac Injury. (springer.com)
  • Blunt cardiac injury (BCI) most commonly occurs from motor vehicle accidents, followed by falls and crush injuries. (nih.gov)
  • Who is at increased risk for cardiac toxicity? (nccn.org)
  • Patients who are older, young children, and women have a greater risk for cardiac toxicity. (nccn.org)
  • What is a cardiac risk calculator? (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A cardiac risk calculator looks to assess a person's chances of experiencing a cardiac event within the next 10 years. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In this article, we examine the factors a cardiac risk calculator uses and why. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • A cardiac risk calculator takes data for an individual's predictors of disease, such as blood pressure , and compares the results with population-level statistics. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • All cardiac risk calculators use biological factors that affect an individual's risk of developing problems in the arteries. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Three key factors are out of an individual's control when assessing for cardiac risk: Age, ethnicity, and sex. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In spite of this, people still maintain relatively poor diets and engage in activities that increase their risk of developing cardiac disease. (wikinvest.com)
  • In an effort to help identify those at risk for sudden cardiac death, Miami Children's Hospital launched a new initiative that provides free electrocardiograms to middle and high school athletes. (sun-sentinel.com)
  • We believe that this risk may be increased if the individuals are exposed to cardiac-targeting strains," she said. (redorbit.com)
  • Because they are more likely to also have coronary artery disease and other medical conditions, their risk of sudden cardiac death is even higher. (rense.com)
  • The CAC score is an independent marker of risk for cardiac events, cardiac mortality, and all-cause mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first section covers the scientific basis of cardiac anaesthesia: anatomy, physiology, pathology, and pharmacology. (google.com)
  • Cardiac tamponade in Still disease: a review of the literature. (medscape.com)
  • Clinicians should also consider infiltrative cardiomyopathy (ie, glycogen storage disease, Fabry disease, Hurler disease, and others) when evaluating patients with suspected cardiac amyloidosis. (medscape.com)
  • In modern times, cardiac disease has emerged as the leading cause of death worldwide, particularly in developed countries. (wikinvest.com)
  • The World Health Organization estimates that by 2010, cardiac disease will surpass AIDS as the leading cause of death in developing countries. (wikinvest.com)
  • As the largest cause of death worldwide, cardiac disease has spawned the development of an entire industry dedicated to its treatment. (wikinvest.com)
  • What is cardiac disease? (wikinvest.com)
  • There are many different kinds of cardiac disease, but they all threaten the circulatory system in one way or another. (wikinvest.com)
  • There are a wide range of both drug treatments and surgical procedures that are used to either prevent or treat cardiac disease. (wikinvest.com)
  • Which companies are involved in the treatment of cardiac disease? (wikinvest.com)
  • 1) Indications for and objectives of cardiac catheterization in aortic valve disease. (medindia.net)
  • This is despite growing evidence that the excitotoxic mechanism plays a major role in cardiac disease. (rense.com)
  • Great development and growth will be seen in the short term, allowing radiologists to diagnose cardiac artery disease without anesthesia and in a non-invasive way. (wikipedia.org)
  • No longer is the term Coronary Care Unit an accurate reflection of these units and hence the change to the term Acute Cardiac Care Unit. (umanitoba.ca)
  • The hemodynamic changes in tension pneumopericardium simulate acute cardiac tamponade. (medscape.com)