• Have carbon monoxide and smoke detectors installed in your home. (cdc.gov)
  • The city-owned hockey rink didn't have carbon monoxide detectors, but Spritzer said the devices will be installed before it reopens. (foxnews.com)
  • Four brands of combination smoke and carbon monoxide detectors must be replaced after officials found they do not work properly. (scrippsnews.com)
  • The Consumer Product Safety Commission urged consumers to stop using several brands of combination smoke and carbon monoxide detectors as the products have failed to work. (scrippsnews.com)
  • The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) strongly recommends the use of approved, audible carbon monoxide (CO) detectors in all homes that use gas appliances. (parliament.uk)
  • For complete information about the new Massachusetts requirements for residential carbon monoxide detectors, visit Mass.gov . (berkshiregas.com)
  • Texas is one of six states with no statewide requirement for carbon monoxide detectors. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Carbon monoxide detectors, adequate venting of furnaces and other sources of indoor combustion, and not allowing a car to run in an enclosed space (for example, a closed garage) help prevent carbon monoxide poisoning. (msdmanuals.com)
  • In mammalian physiology, carbon monoxide is a classical example of hormesis where low concentrations serve as an endogenous neurotransmitter (gasotransmitter) and high concentrations are toxic resulting in carbon monoxide poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early humans probably discovered the toxicity of carbon monoxide poisoning upon introducing fire into their dwellings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cleopatra may have died from carbon monoxide poisoning. (wikipedia.org)
  • Friedrich Hoffmann conducted the first modern scientific investigation into carbon monoxide poisoning from coal in 1716. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is the leading cause of death due to poisoning in the United States. (cdc.gov)
  • Since many of these symptoms can occur with viral illnesses, carbon monoxide poisoning is often confused with these conditions. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is a very serious issue. (pcmag.com)
  • Indoor use of portable generators, charcoal grills, or camp stoves can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning. (cdc.gov)
  • Our third and final video on carbon monoxide safety advice focuses on how to recognise the signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning and what to do if you suspect a CO escape. (hetas.co.uk)
  • Every year around 40 people die and over 4,000 are injured as a result of Carbon Monoxide poisoning. (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • A headache is the most common symptom of mild carbon monoxide poisoning. (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning can be similar to those of food poisoning and the flu. (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • However, unlike the flu, carbon monoxide poisoning does not cause a high temperature (fever). (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • Although carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can be prevented, every year, hundreds of people in the United States die as a result of accidental, non-fire related exposure to this toxic gas. (cdc.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning can happen in a matter of minutes, so if you suspect a problem, don't hesitate to go outside! (berkshiregas.com)
  • Recently released autopsy reports reveal both carbon monoxide poisoning and drug intoxication led or contributed to the deaths of three people within a three-day period earlier this summer while aboard a vessel anchored offshore at Douglas's Sandy Beach. (juneauempire.com)
  • According to the medical examiner's reports, the deaths of Curtis Edwin Anderson, 51, and Amoretta Nina Nichele Wesley, 28, were caused by acute carbon monoxide poisoning. (juneauempire.com)
  • However, her autopsy did not show evidence of carbon monoxide poisoning. (juneauempire.com)
  • Researchers looked at cases of carbon monoxide poisoning surrounding cold snaps and snowstorms. (everydayhealth.com)
  • New research has found a dangerous consequence of prolonged power outages in the United States due to severe weather - carbon monoxide poisoning. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is just one example of the effects on health that we can expect with climate change, rising global temperatures, and increased frequency and severity of severe weather events," says Christopher Worsham, MD , a pulmonologist and critical care physician at Harvard Medical School in Boston and the lead author of the research letter, published on January 13 in the New England Journal of Medicine . (everydayhealth.com)
  • Outbreaks of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning have been reported after severe weather events that cause power outages and lead to an increased use of generators. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Our findings suggest that we should routinely expect there to be cases of carbon monoxide poisoning in areas where the power is out - particularly when that outage lasts over 48 hours - and that children may be more susceptible to power-outage-associated CO poisoning," says Dr. Worsham. (everydayhealth.com)
  • The risk for carbon monoxide poisoning can be mitigated at the source by preventing power outages in the first place by improvements to our electrical grid infrastructure, particularly as severe weather events are expected to increase in frequency and severity with rising global temperature," says Worsham. (everydayhealth.com)
  • Objectives: The purpose of this study is the development of a porcine model of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning to investigate alterations in brain and heart mitochondrial function. (lu.se)
  • Small amounts are not usually harmful, but poisoning occurs if levels of carbon monoxide in the blood become too high. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Inhaling tobacco smoke produces carbon monoxide in the blood, but usually not enough to result in symptoms of poisoning. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide is one of the most common causes of poisoning deaths. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Most people who develop mild carbon monoxide poisoning recover quickly when moved into fresh air. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Severe carbon monoxide poisoning is often fatal. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Rarely, weeks after apparent recovery from severe carbon monoxide poisoning, symptoms such as memory loss, poor coordination, movement disorders, depression, and psychosis (which are referred to as delayed neuropsychiatric symptoms) develop. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide is dangerous because a person may not recognize drowsiness as a symptom of poisoning. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Consequently, someone with mild poisoning can go to sleep and continue to breathe the carbon monoxide until severe poisoning or death occurs. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Some people with long-standing, mild carbon monoxide poisoning caused by furnaces or heaters may mistake their symptoms for other conditions, such as the flu or other viral infections. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning is diagnosed by measuring the level of carbon monoxide in the blood. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Because symptoms can be vague and variable, mild carbon monoxide poisoning may be mistaken for the flu. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Analysis of reported carbon monoxide poisoning cases in Colorado. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning from spray paint inhalation. (medscape.com)
  • QuickStats: Average Annual Number of Deaths and Death Rates from Unintentional, Non-Fire-Related Carbon Monoxide Poisoning,*† by Sex and Age Group - United States, 1999-2010. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning during ice storms: a tale of two cities. (medscape.com)
  • Noninvasive pulse CO-oximetry expedites evaluation and management of patients with carbon monoxide poisoning. (medscape.com)
  • Practice recommendations in the diagnosis, management, and prevention of carbon monoxide poisoning. (medscape.com)
  • Myocardial injury and long-term mortality following moderate to severe carbon monoxide poisoning. (medscape.com)
  • Acute hydrocephalus following carbon monoxide poisoning. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisoning in a patient with carbon dioxide retention: a therapeutic challenge. (medscape.com)
  • Management of carbon monoxide poisoning in the absence of hyperbaric oxygenation chamber. (medscape.com)
  • Confirmation of the pulse oximetry gap in carbon monoxide poisoning. (medscape.com)
  • Hyperbaric oxygen for carbon monoxide poisoning : a systematic review and critical analysis of the evidence. (medscape.com)
  • The symptoms and signs of carbon monoxide poisoning are variable and nonspecific. (cdc.gov)
  • Other testing, such as a fingerstick blood sugar, alcohol and toxicology screen, head CT scan or lumbar puncture may be needed to exclude other causes of altered mental status when the diagnosis of carbon monoxide poisoning is inconclusive. (cdc.gov)
  • Clinical examination of 3 patients with delayed neuropsychiatric encephalopathy induced by carbon monoxide poisoning, who recovered from severe neurocognitive impairment by repetitive hyperbaric oxygen therapy]. (bvsalud.org)
  • We performed hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) therapy for 3 patients with delayed neuropsychiatric encephalopathy induced by carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning . (bvsalud.org)
  • Many carbon monoxide poisonings occur in the winter months when furnaces, gas fireplaces, and portable heaters are being used and windows are closed. (medlineplus.gov)
  • WASHINGTON, D.C. - After a recent rash of carbon monoxide poisonings - including incidents in Maryland, Pennsylvania and New Jersey -- the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is repeating its recommendation that every home should have a carbon monoxide (CO) alarm. (cpsc.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) gas is an environmental hazard, and unintentional CO poisonings have occurred in multiple settings, including residences, motor vehicles, and workplaces. (cdc.gov)
  • How many (a) poisonings and (b) deaths have been reported due to Carbon Monoxide (CO)? (ons.gov.uk)
  • Carbon monoxide poisonings resulting from open air exposures to operating motorboats--Lake Havasu City, Arizona, 2003. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide poisonings after two major hurricanes--Alabama and Texas, August-October 2005. (medscape.com)
  • Exposure to high levels of carbon monoxide can be life-threatening. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing high levels of carbon monoxide during pregnancy can cause miscarriage. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing lower levels of carbon monoxide during pregnancy can lead to slower than normal mental development of your child. (cdc.gov)
  • Blood tests of a construction worker who collapsed Wednesday outside a building owned by Yale University led emergency crews to uncover potentially lethal levels of carbon monoxide inside. (kxxv.com)
  • However, an hour-and-a-half later, the hospital informed them that the worker had extremely high levels of carbon monoxide in his bloodstream. (kxxv.com)
  • The early development of metallurgy and smelting technologies emerging circa 6,000 BC through the Bronze Age likewise plagued humankind from carbon monoxide exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In animal studies, exposure to carbon monoxide during pregnancy had effects on birth weight, the heart, the central nervous system, and development. (cdc.gov)
  • There is evidence that children who have asthma may be more vulnerable to respiratory effects associated with exposure to carbon monoxide. (cdc.gov)
  • How can families reduce the risk of exposure to carbon monoxide? (cdc.gov)
  • People who have pets at home may notice that their animals become weak or unresponsive from carbon monoxide exposure. (medlineplus.gov)
  • There is evidence that children who have asthma may be more vulnerable to respiratory effects associated with The EPA has established an environmental limit of 10 mg/m 3 exposure to carbon monoxide. (cdc.gov)
  • exposure to carbon monoxide? (cdc.gov)
  • What are the symptoms of carbon monoxide exposure? (calgary.ca)
  • In 2009, more than 30 people at a youth hockey tournament in Greeley were treated for exposure to carbon monoxide. (foxnews.com)
  • SOUTH HAVEN, Mich. (AP) - Authorities say 10 people aboard a boat on Lake Michigan were sickened after exposure to carbon monoxide. (wxyz.com)
  • Exposure to carbon monoxide can cause flu-like symptoms, including headache, dizziness, weakness, nausea and loss of muscle control. (berkshiregas.com)
  • Prolonged exposure to carbon monoxide can lead to serious illness and even death. (berkshiregas.com)
  • If people from the same dwelling, particularly a heated dwelling, all experience vague flu-like symptoms at the same time, doctors may suspect carbon monoxide exposure as the cause. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Exposure to toxins, such as pesticides or carbon monoxide, may cause injury or death. (cdc.gov)
  • Crews then returned to the location and found 13 people at the building with elevated carbon monoxide levels and complaining of headaches. (kxxv.com)
  • Carbon monoxide (chemical formula CO) is a poisonous, flammable gas that is colorless, odorless, tasteless, and slightly less dense than air. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carbon monoxide is a colorless, nonirritating, odorless, tasteless gas that is found in both indoor and outdoor air. (cdc.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is a colorless, odorless gas produced by incomplete combustion of carbonaceous material. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odorless, colorless, poisonous gas that can cause sudden illness and death if present in sufficient concentration in the ambient air. (cdc.gov)
  • Install a carbon monoxide detector on each floor of your home. (medlineplus.gov)
  • If the furnace or water heater begin emitting deadly, odorless gas, the SafetyChoice Carbon Monoxide Detector will alert the SafetyChoice Centralized Monitoring Station to send help immediately. (comfortkeepers.com)
  • Fontana said a typical home carbon monoxide detector sounds an alarm when it detects 35 parts per million. (kxxv.com)
  • Google-owned Nest announced multiple new products during a media gathering earlier today in San Francisco including its first branded wireless home camera and a revised smoke and carbon monoxide detector. (techspot.com)
  • Nest also unveiled its second generation smoke and carbon monoxide detector. (techspot.com)
  • Apart from the toxicity of carbon monoxide, indigenous Native Americans may have experienced the neuroactive properties of carbon monoxide through shamanistic fireside rituals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek physician Galen (129-199 AD) speculated that there was a change in the composition of the air that caused harm when inhaled, and many others of the era developed a basis of knowledge about carbon monoxide in the context of coal fume toxicity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Suner S, Jay G. Carbon monoxide has direct toxicity on the myocardium distinct from effects of hypoxia in an ex vivo rat heart model. (medscape.com)
  • We also hold ad-hoc analysis published on our website for 2011 to 2017 showing the total number of deaths where toxic effects of carbon monoxide were mentioned on the death certificate. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Carbon monoxide is an odorless gas that causes thousands of deaths each year in North America. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Using ICD-10, deaths from toxic effects of carbon monoxide would be given a nature of injury code of T58. (ons.gov.uk)
  • Unintentional carbon monoxide-related deaths in the United States, 1979 through 1988. (medscape.com)
  • Herman Boerhaave conducted the first scientific experiments on the effect of carbon monoxide (coal fumes) on animals in the 1730s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carl Wilhelm Scheele similarly isolated carbon monoxide from charcoal in 1773 and thought it could be the carbonic entity making fumes toxic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inhaling carbon monoxide fumes hinders the body from properly using oxygen and can harm organs, including the heart and brain. (kxxv.com)
  • Carbon monoxide is a gas that has no odor or color and is found in fumes made by cars, trucks, stoves, gas ranges, and heating systems. (everydayhealth.com)
  • If improperly vented, automobiles, furnaces, hot water heaters, gas heaters, kerosene heaters, and stoves (including wood stoves and stoves with charcoal briquettes) can cause carbon monoxide poisoning. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas that has no colour, smell, or taste. (calgary.ca)
  • Carbon monoxide is a colourless, odourless, tasteless, poisonous gas that is released when any fossil fuel doesn't burn properly. (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • This battery-powered alarm from Kidde sports a backlit display that allows you to view the parts per million of carbon monoxide in the vicinity - even in the dark. (pcmag.com)
  • However, it will detect both smoke and carbon monoxide - vocalizing the specifics of whichever tripped the alarm. (pcmag.com)
  • Install at least one carbon monoxide alarm on every level of your home, including the basement. (calgary.ca)
  • Battery Powered Smoke/Carbon Monoxide Combo Alarm, The First Alert SMICO100 Battery-Operated Combination Smoke & Carbon Monoxide Alarm is equipped with First Alert's Precision Detection advanced sensing technology and meets new industry standards. (truevalue.com)
  • This 2-in-1 smoke and carbon monoxide alarm provides reliable protection against both threats and is easy to install and maintain. (truevalue.com)
  • Detailed guidance on where a carbon monoxide alarm can be fitted to comply with Building Regulations when you have a solid fuel appliance installed. (hetas.co.uk)
  • Get an audible CO alarm which is certified to British Standard BS EN 50291 which can be purchased from your local DIY store, supermarket or energy supplier. (wwutilities.co.uk)
  • Take protection to the next level by installing a carbon monoxide alarm. (berkshiregas.com)
  • The most common source of carbon monoxide is the partial combustion of carbon-containing compounds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Smoke from fires commonly contains carbon monoxide, particularly when combustion of fuels is incomplete. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide mainly enters the environment breathing, seizures and coma have been reported in from natural sources and from the burning of people inhaling carbon monoxide. (cdc.gov)
  • CPSC also urges consumers to have a professional inspection of all fuel- burning appliances -- including furnaces, stoves, fireplaces, clothes dryers, water heaters, and space heaters -- to detect deadly carbon monoxide leaks. (cpsc.gov)
  • Unintentional non-fire-related carbon monoxide exposures--United States, 2001-2003. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide levels in indoor air vary depending on the presence of appliances such as kerosene and gas space heaters, furnaces, wood stoves, generators and other gasoline-powered equipment. (cdc.gov)
  • It is made when carbon fuel is not burned completely and stoves, furnaces, heaters and generators. (cdc.gov)
  • Gunnison, Colo. - An ice-cleaning machine was the source of a carbon monoxide leak that sickened 61 people at a youth hockey tournament in western Colorado. (foxnews.com)
  • A mysterious carbon monoxide leak sent 32 children and daycare employees at a Pennsylvania daycare to local hospitals. (medpagetoday.com)
  • Georg Ernst Stahl mentioned carbonarii halitus in 1697 in reference to toxic vapors thought to be carbon monoxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • People who have heart or lung disease are more vulnerable to the toxic effects of carbon monoxide. (cdc.gov)
  • In the Fischer-Tropsch process, coal and related carbon-rich feedstocks are converted into liquid fuels via the intermediacy of CO. Originally developed as part of the German war effort to compensate for their lack of domestic petroleum, this technology continues today. (wikipedia.org)
  • Make sure appliances that burn natural gasoline, has set a legal limit of 55 mg/m 3 (50 ppmv) for carbon kerosene, or other fuels are properly installed monoxide in air for an 8-hour work day, 40 hour workweek. (cdc.gov)
  • Learn about carbon monoxide and the law with regard to carbon monoxide alarms and solid fuel appliance installations. (hetas.co.uk)
  • Carbon monoxide intoxication. (who.int)
  • When you breathe in carbon monoxide, the poison replaces the oxygen in your bloodstream. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Carbon monoxide consists of one carbon atom and one oxygen atom connected by a triple bond. (wikipedia.org)
  • The gas was identified as a compound containing carbon and oxygen by William Cruickshank in 1800. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inhaled carbon monoxide attaches to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells that gives blood its red color and enables it to carry oxygen. (msdmanuals.com)
  • Carbon monoxide prevents the blood from carrying oxygen so the body's tissues do not get enough oxygen. (msdmanuals.com)
  • The diffusion capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO) is used to measure the body's ability to transfer oxygen across the alveolar-capillary membrane. (medscape.com)
  • Similar to self-reports, the exhaled carbon monoxide measurement successfully distinguished smokers from nonsmokers. (who.int)
  • Industry uses carbon monoxide to manufacture compounds such as acetic anhydride, polycarbonates, acetic acid and polyketone. (cdc.gov)
  • All people are exposed to carbon monoxide at varying levels by breathing in air. (cdc.gov)
  • People with ongoing cardiovascular and/or respiratory disease may be particularly vulnerable to carbon monoxide. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing in high amounts of carbon monoxide may be life-threatening. (cdc.gov)
  • Breathing in carbon monoxide is very dangerous. (medlineplus.gov)
  • Upon emission into the atmosphere, carbon monoxide affects several processes that contribute to climate change. (wikipedia.org)
  • This affinity for iron comes in handy in a newly created material that can absorb carbon monoxide far better than other materials, with potential applications in industrial processes like syngas production, where CO is a key player, and reactions where CO is an unwanted contaminant. (scienceblog.com)
  • We have produced a series of carbon monoxide safety videos. (hetas.co.uk)
  • For more tips on carbon monoxide safety, please download our consumer reference, Carbon Monoxide Information brochure. (berkshiregas.com)
  • NIOSH Safety and Health Topic:Carbon Monoxide Dangers in Boating. (medscape.com)
  • Carbon monoxide is a chemical produced from the incomplete burning of natural gas or other products containing carbon. (medlineplus.gov)