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  • nanotubes
  • Using a new method for precisely controlling the deposition of carbon, researchers have demonstrated a technique for connecting multi-walled carbon nanotubes to the metallic pads of integrated circuits without the high interface resistance produced by traditional fabrication techniques. (ecnmag.com)
  • Using this three-dimensional fabrication technique, researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology developed graphitic nanojoints on both ends of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes, which yielded a 10-fold decrease in resistivity in its connection to metal junctions. (ecnmag.com)
  • The technique could facilitate the integration of carbon nanotubes as interconnects in next-generation integrated circuits that use both silicon and carbon components. (ecnmag.com)
  • For the first time, we have established connections to multiple shells of carbon nanotubes with a technique that is amenable to integration with conventional integrated circuit microfabrication processes," said Andrei Fedorov, a professor in the George W. Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at Georgia Tech. "Connecting to multiple shells allows us to dramatically reduce the resistance and move to the next level of device performance. (ecnmag.com)
  • To make it scalable for manufacturing, they also worked toward technologies for isolating and aligning individual carbon nanotubes between the metal terminals on a silicon substrate, and for examining the properties of the resulting structures. (ecnmag.com)
  • The researchers believe the technique could also be used to connect multi-layered graphene to metal contacts, though their published research has so far focused on carbon nanotubes. (ecnmag.com)
  • Unique to the EBID process, the deposited carbon makes a strong, chemically-bonded connection to the ends of the carbon nanotubes, unlike the weakly-coupled physical interface made in traditional techniques based on metal evaporation. (ecnmag.com)
  • Prior to deposition, the ends of the nanotubes are opened using an etching process, so the deposited carbon grows into the open end of the nanotube to electronically connect multiple shells. (ecnmag.com)
  • Atom-by-atom, we can build the connection where the electron beam strikes right near the open end of the carbon nanotubes," Fedorov explained. (ecnmag.com)
  • e open ends of carbon nanotubes on any desired substrate. (ecnmag.com)
  • Multi-walled carbon nanotubes offer the promise of higher information delivery throughput for certain interconnects used in electronic devices. (ecnmag.com)
  • Researchers have envisioned a future generation of hybrid devices based on traditional integrated circuits but using interconnects based on carbon nanotubes. (ecnmag.com)
  • Earth's
  • In nature, small amounts of carbon disulfide are found in gases released to the earth's surface as, for example, in volcanic eruptions or over marshes. (cdc.gov)
  • precursor
  • When the secondary electrons interact with hydrocarbon precursor molecules introduced into the SEM chamber, carbon is deposited in desired locations. (ecnmag.com)
  • thermal
  • Thermal annealing of the carbon after deposition converts it to a crystalline graphitic form that significantly improves electrical conductivity. (ecnmag.com)
  • occur
  • Exposure to carbon disulfide can occur by breathing it in the air and by drinking water or eating foods that contain it. (cdc.gov)
  • It also requires special equipment and cannot tell you exactly how much carbon disulfide you were exposed to or predict whether harmful effects will occur. (cdc.gov)
  • Department of Healt
  • The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), and the EPA have not classified carbon disulfide for carcinogenicity. (cdc.gov)
  • high
  • At very high levels, carbon disulfide may be life-threatening because of its effects on the nervous system. (cdc.gov)
  • High concentrations of carbon disulfide have caused skin burns when the chemical accidentally touched people's skin. (cdc.gov)
  • Until now, however, resistance at the connections between the carbon structures and conventional silicon electronics has been too high to make the devices practical. (ecnmag.com)
  • water
  • Most carbon disulfide in the air and surface water is from manufacturing and processing activities. (cdc.gov)
  • Carbon disulfide does not stay dissolved in water very long, and it also moves through soils fairly quickly. (cdc.gov)
  • Carbon disulfide does not appear to be taken up in significant amounts by the organisms living in water. (cdc.gov)
  • usually
  • The impure carbon disulfide that is usually used in most industrial processes is a yellowish liquid with an unpleasant odor, like that of rotting radishes. (cdc.gov)
  • found
  • Carbon disulfide has been found in at least 210 of the 1,430 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). (cdc.gov)
  • affect
  • Studies in animals indicate that carbon disulfide can affect the normal functions of the brain, liver, and heart. (cdc.gov)
  • show
  • Is there a medical test to show whether I've been exposed to carbon disulfide? (cdc.gov)