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  • recreational
  • Hyasynth is part of a new wave of genetic engineering firms across Canada and the U.S., splicing and dicing molecules found in cannabis plants, hoping to create new recreational products and medicines to treat pain, cancers, insomnia, epilepsy and a host of other health problems. (cbc.ca)
  • In 2013 between 128 and 232 million people are thought to have used cannabis as a recreational drug (2.7% to 4.9% of the global population between the ages of 15 and 65). (wn.com)
  • 2017
  • THOUSAND OAKS, CA / ACCESSWIRE / June 12, 2019 / CBDual Biotechnology Corp., a subsidiary of THC Farmaceuticals, Inc (OTC PINK: CBDG) today announced that its parent company has been granted patent protection for the South African Patent Application No. 2017/01966 regarding the parent company's Methods of Producing Antibody- Rich Cannabis and Honeysuckle Plants. (atlantaleader.com)
  • legally
  • Most cannabis products sold legally in the US are required to be tested and labeled for THC and CBD content. (leafly.com)
  • controlled substance
  • In the United States, Cannabis is a controlled substance requiring special licensing for its use (see Question 1 and Question 3 ). (cancer.gov)
  • In the United States, Cannabis is a controlled substance and has been classified as a Schedule I agent (a drug with a high potential for abuse and no currently accepted medical use). (cancer.gov)
  • genes
  • For the antibodies to be produced in the plant genes coding for the chimeric mAbs are inserted into viral vectors, and tobacco leaves are infected with the viral vector encoding for the antibodies, using Agrobacterium cultures. (atlantaleader.com)
  • Cannabis producers, biotech firms and drug companies, along with the law firms who represent them, say genetic engineering - a controversial technique pioneered in agriculture - will allow companies to patent genes synthesized from cannabis, potentially unlocking billions of dollars in new investment and creating jobs. (cbc.ca)
  • Critics, however, worry patents on cannabis genes allow a small group of private companies to control the building blocks of life itself, along with concerns about possibly negative impacts of the newly created genetic material. (cbc.ca)
  • medical
  • What is the history of the medical use of Cannabis ? (cancer.gov)
  • In 1937, the U.S. Treasury began taxing Cannabis under the Marijuana Tax Act at one dollar per ounce for medicinal use and one hundred dollars per ounce for non-medical use. (cancer.gov)
  • The American Medical Association (AMA) opposed this regulation of Cannabis and did not want studies of its potential medicinal benefits to be limited. (cancer.gov)
  • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved Cannabis as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition. (uwhealth.org)
  • Cannabis intended for the medical marijuana market grows at OrganiGram Inc. in Moncton, N.B., in 2016. (cbc.ca)
  • While THC is the principal psychoactive component of cannabis and has certain medical uses, CBD stands out because it is both non-intoxicating and displays a broad range of potential medical applications including helping with anxiety, inflammation, pain, and seizures. (mens-best-health.net)
  • effects
  • At this time, there is not enough evidence to recommend that patients inhale or ingest Cannabis as a treatment for cancer-related symptoms or side effects of cancer therapy (see Question 7 ). (cancer.gov)
  • By pulling the same levers in the neural system as the brain's own endocannabinoid chemicals, THC causes the euphoria and other effects associated with cannabis. (whybiotech.com)
  • There is growing research investigating cannabis use and the effects on diabetes. (diabetes.co.uk)
  • The potential benefits of medicinal Cannabis for people living with cancer include antiemetic effects, appetite stimulation, pain relief, and improved sleep. (uwhealth.org)
  • found
  • Instead, scientists at Hyasynth Bio genetically alter fermented yeast - a process comparable to creating synthetic perfume from chemicals contained inside flowers - to construct copies of the DNA strands found in cannabis. (cbc.ca)
  • I haven't found a single grasshopper on this plant, while I have to pick them off the rest of my crop. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • producers
  • Biotechnology companies and drug producers are trying to isolate and patent the active chemicals in cannabis, potentially creating new medicines. (cbc.ca)
  • There is no official industry standard for calculating the total THC of a cannabis product , and different producers and testing facilities calculate it in different ways. (leafly.com)
  • products
  • Cannabis Science will test its pharmaceutical products with FDA guidance and oversight to determine if it will reduce ARDS-associated deaths from both the Avian and Swine influenza infections. (greenlivingideas.com)
  • Let's take a closer look at the different ways you can estimate THC levels in cannabis products (the same logic applies to CBD). (leafly.com)
  • All CBD products start out the same way: as an extract from the leaves and flowers of cannabis plants. (health-nexus.org)
  • Humans
  • Cannabis has been used by humans for thousands of years, with the earliest record of its use dating back to the 3rd millennium BC. (diabetes.co.uk)
  • Adams IB, Martin BR: Cannabis: pharmacology and toxicology in animals and humans. (uwhealth.org)
  • different
  • A deeper understanding of cannabis genetics means companies will be able to figure out which parts of the plant's makeup drive different functions, making it easier to breed plants more quickly and effectively. (thecannabist.co)
  • Patenting a gene technically isn't any different from patenting anything else,' said Erica Lowthers, a partner at Aird and McBurney, a Toronto law firm that advises cannabis companies. (cbc.ca)
  • The different terpene blends make the aromas of plants unique and have been used throughout the ages to make perfumes. (dispensarygta.com)
  • grown
  • Antibodies are also produced through cultures of hybridoma cells, for example, that may be grown to contain the antibodies. (atlantaleader.com)
  • Antibodies may be grown in plant leaves as well, as is shown in U.S. Pat. (atlantaleader.com)
  • Using a plant to grow the antibodies reduces the risk of contamination by mammalian viruses, however the process of growing the antibodies is a long one-first the plant is grown to a leaf-bearing stage, and then each plant must be treated with an engineered plant virus that has been tricked in to producing significant amounts of antibody proteins. (atlantaleader.com)
  • Once the antibodies have been grown in the leaves, the proteins must be extracted from the plant cells and isolated in order to be converted to pharmaceutical use for human consumption. (atlantaleader.com)
  • As an example, the influenza virus antibodies may be grown in plants after being treated with a virus as above. (atlantaleader.com)
  • The tobacco plant is grown for a period of weeks, after which point the antibodies are extracted from the leaves and isolated for manufacture. (atlantaleader.com)
  • This leafy plant is grown around the world and can be cultivated both outdoors and indoors. (drugnet.net)
  • laboratory
  • Cannabis has been shown to kill cancer cells in the laboratory (see Question 6 ). (cancer.gov)
  • At the Hyasynth Biologicals laboratory in Montreal, scientists are working on the latest frontier in the cannabis business: genetically engineering the active ingredients in marijuana and then patenting them. (cbc.ca)
  • Lab workers test marijuana samples at Cannalysis, a cannabis testing laboratory in Santa Ana, Calif., in August. (cbc.ca)
  • drug
  • To do research with Cannabis in the United States, researchers must file an Investigational New Drug (IND) application with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), receive a Schedule I license from the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and gain approval from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). (cancer.gov)
  • Most people know that THC is the drug present in cannabis, but there is a lot more to know about it than that! (whybiotech.com)
  • normally
  • Cannabis flower normally contains very low levels of THC. (leafly.com)
  • Nicholas says that he was told by many people that it couldn't be done, that the marijuana plant was not capable of being pollinated by the bees, who normally specialize in flowering plants, and that even if he succeeded, the bees would be harmed in the process. (whatsthatbug.com)
  • people
  • however, some people find that cannabis causes an increase in anxiety. (whybiotech.com)
  • This cancer information summary provides an overview of the use of Cannabis and its components as a treatment for people with cancer-related symptoms caused by the disease itself or its treatment. (uwhealth.org)
  • contains
  • Most labels will display a low number like this because the plant contains mostly THCA, which needs to be decarboxylated ("activated") by heat. (leafly.com)
  • medicine
  • Dr. Cornelia Wagner, owner of Hawthorne Veterinary Clinic in Portland, OR, is one of the veterinarians opening her mind and her doctor's office to the idea of cannabis as a safe, effective medicine when dosed properly. (mens-best-health.net)
  • bodies
  • While it is tempting to imagine that our bodies evolved to process cannabis, it is more likely that cannabis evolved to take advantage of existing brain systems. (whybiotech.com)
  • benefits
  • A number of animal-based studies and some human studies have highlighted a number of potential health benefits of cannabis for diabetes. (diabetes.co.uk)
  • With the explosion of media coverage on CBD's benefits to children with intractable seizures, the falsehood that CBD is the "medicinal" component and THC is the "intoxicating" component of this plant has spread across the globe. (healer.com)
  • find
  • Now that the snow is finally falling, here's where to find a cannabis massage in Aspen so you can make the most of every powder day. (thecannabist.co)
  • An observer wouldn't find any cannabis plants or growing equipment in their facility. (cbc.ca)
  • Industry
  • Our Chief Science Officer, Dr. Raj Gupta, got to spend time with the man who discovered CBD, THC, and a whole bunch of other important endocannabinoid discoveries that are fueling the cannabis industry! (whybiotech.com)
  • We Are A Group Of Individuals With A Goal To Improve All Facets Of The Cannabis Industry. (whybiotech.com)
  • The cannabis industry is poised for a dramatic acceleration in innovation. (cbc.ca)