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  • 2016
  • They estimate that some 246,660 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016, and that 40,450 women will die of the disease. (healthline.com)
  • A 2016 study in the Annals of Family Medicine found that most men with localized prostate cancer underestimate their life expectancy without treatment and overestimate their potential gain in life expectancy with surgery or radiation. (healthcentral.com)
  • treatments
  • These trials were intended to test out innovative head and neck cancer treatments. (psychcentral.com)
  • Today, patients with adrenal cancers have more treatment options than ever before, and oncologists have a greater understanding of how to tailor these treatments to provide the maximum benefits. (moffitt.org)
  • For instance, some treatments that are effective for rectal cancer are less effective for colon cancer, and oncologists who treat many patients with these conditions have a broader experience with these treatments and can design more tailored treatment plans. (moffitt.org)
  • Hundreds of drugs, including sedatives, antibiotics, painkillers and cancer treatments, have gone in and out of short supply in recent years. (newsday.com)
  • The child received high doses of chemotherapy and radiation and now seems cancer-free, although the treatments damaged her lung capacity, leaving her short of breath. (newsday.com)
  • For many patients with cancers like chronic lymphoma, chronic myelocytic leukemia and now multiple myeloma, longevity lies in the ability of science to remain one step ahead of the malignancy by unraveling its genetic and molecular underpinnings and producing treatments tailored to counter them. (nytimes.com)
  • Tamoxifen is commonly offered alongside other breast cancer treatments and it is usually recommended that treatment with the drug continues for five years after other treatments have ended. (www.nhs.uk)
  • pancreatic cancer patients
  • Within Moffitt Cancer Center's Gastrointestinal Oncology Program, our pancreatic cancer patients not only have access to some of the best surgeons in the country, but also benefit from the latest treatment options, a wide range of clinical trials and compassionate support, all of which are provided in a single, convenient location. (moffitt.org)
  • Between three and 12 weeks after surgery, 493 pancreatic cancer patients in France and Canada randomly received either the chemo drug gemcitabine ( Gemzar ), the current standard of care, or a combination of the drugs oxaliplatin ( Eloxatin ), leucovorin (folinic acid), irinotecan ( Camptosar ), and 5-fluorouracil ( Adrucil ). (medicinenet.com)
  • oncologists
  • Working with an adrenal cancer specialist - Cancerous adrenal tumors are uncommon, and many oncologists have minimal experience in treating them. (moffitt.org)
  • At Moffitt Cancer Center, however, we have treated many complex endocrine cancers, and our head and neck oncologists are among the most accomplished in the field. (moffitt.org)
  • Our oncologists can provide additional information about the general adrenal cancer survival rate, as well as the ways in which you can improve your own personal outcome. (moffitt.org)
  • breast
  • There is a genetic explanation for why women from poor backgrounds are less likely to beat breast cancer," BBC News reported. (www.nhs.uk)
  • These findings suggest that part of the reason why women from deprived areas have worse overall and disease-free survival from breast cancer may be related to mutations in the p53 gene. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The study was funded by Breast Cancer Research, Scotland. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This cohort study investigated whether there is a relationship between socio-economic status, certain genetic mutations in breast cancer, and survival or recurrence of the cancer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Previous studies have suggested that certain mutations in the p53 gene are associated with more aggressive breast cancers, and can predict how successful treatment will be. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers used primary breast cancer tissue that had been donated to a tissue bank for research purposes. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The samples were obtained from 246 Caucasian women with primary breast cancer who had surgery to remove it between 1997 and 2001, and who had not previously received treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • But this potential benefit has to be weighed against the increased risk for breast cancer and certain risk factors for heart disease associated with hormone therapy, Brooks says. (webmd.com)
  • However they admit the outcome might be different in cancers like breast cancer and prostate cancer, which are hormone-influenced. (psychcentral.com)
  • A new study finds breast cancer patients who have a poor relationship with their spouse may face a more difficult road to recovery than would other women. (psychcentral.com)
  • The study involved 100 women who have participated in the long-running Stress and Immunity Breast Cancer Project at Ohio State. (psychcentral.com)
  • Aspirin may halve the risk of death from breast cancer in women who have had early treatment for the disease", The Independent reported. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This news story is based on research that looked at aspirin use in over 4,000 nurses who had been treated for breast cancer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Most useful would be a randomised controlled trial comparing breast cancer patients taking aspirin with patients who are not. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This prospective observational study investigated whether there is an association between aspirin use and the recurrence of breast cancer and deaths from the disease. (www.nhs.uk)
  • They wanted to see whether there was any difference in survival and recurrence of breast cancer in women who had breast cancer and who had routinely taken aspirin, compared to those who had not. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This type of study was designed to look for associations between aspirin use and breast cancer outcome. (www.nhs.uk)
  • For any report of breast cancer, the participants gave permission for a doctor to review their medical records. (www.nhs.uk)
  • In total, the study looked at the information from 4,164 participants, for whom aspirin use was assessed after breast cancer was diagnosed between 1980 and 2006. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Of the 4,164 participants diagnosed with breast cancer whose aspirin use had been assessed, there were 341 breast cancer deaths and 400 distant recurrences (including the breast cancer deaths). (www.nhs.uk)
  • Aspirin was associated with a lower risk of death from breast cancer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • For the first time, breast cancer survival has im proved because of the benefits of earlier detection and better treatment developed in the past decade. (nypost.com)
  • For instance, data from the American Cancer Society show that women diagnosed with up to Stage II breast cancer have a five-year survival rate of 80 to 100 percent. (nypost.com)
  • Dr. Michael P. Osborne, the newly appointed director of breast cancer programs at Continuum Cancer Centers of New York in Beth Israel Medical Center and St. Lukes-Roosevelt Hospital Centers, is one of the leading breast cancer specialists in New York City. (nypost.com)
  • Women with a family history of breast cancer or who have a BRCA1 or 2 gene abnormality may particularly benefit from MRI and preventive anti-estrogen medication, such as tamoxifen or raloxifene. (nypost.com)
  • Some will chose to have their breast tissue removed to prevent cancer - prophylactic mastectomy - but new reconstructive techniques such as skin- and nipple-sparing surgery can greatly improve the cosmetic results with a better than 95 percent reduction in the risk of cancer. (nypost.com)
  • In the future, breast surgery may be avoidable entirely, as minimally invasive methods such as freezing or heating cancers replace operations. (nypost.com)
  • Breast cancer is a fast-evolving field, and Osborne indicates that "current research will continue to translate into increasingly better results along with more treatment options and improved quality of life in the future. (nypost.com)
  • Patients need to become more proactive about breast cancer screening, particularly if there is a strong family history. (nypost.com)
  • But a growing body of research from scientists studying ovarian, breast and other cancers continues to cement the link between psychological stress and disease, metastatic growth and survival. (cnn.com)
  • Women with breast implants may be less likely to survive breast cancer as they are more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of the disease than those with natural breasts, a study suggests. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • They found that women with cosmetic breast implants were 26 per cent more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of breast cancer than those without implants. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • Results from a further five studies revealed that women with implants were 38 per cent more likely to die from breast cancer than those without implants. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • In the United States alone, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) projects that 12.4 percent of women will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. (healthline.com)
  • The American Cancer Society (ACS) also predicts that about 2,600 men will be diagnosed with breast cancer, and that 440 men will die from the disease. (healthline.com)
  • This survival rate includes all women with breast cancer regardless of the stage or subtype. (healthline.com)
  • The stages of breast cancer relate to how much the cancer has grown and how far it has spread. (healthline.com)
  • Stage 3 breast cancer includes various categories, including cancers that have spread to the skin, chest wall, or multiple lymph nodes in or near the breast. (healthline.com)
  • Stage 4 is metastatic breast cancer, meaning it has spread to one or more distant parts of the body, most commonly to the bones, lungs, or liver. (healthline.com)
  • Your risk of developing breast cancer increases as you age. (healthline.com)
  • Of the 60,290 women who are diagnosed with breast cancer in the United States each year, less than 3 percent of them are below the age of 40. (healthline.com)
  • The average age of death from breast cancer is 68. (healthline.com)
  • White women are most likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer. (healthline.com)
  • Black women are the second most likely group to get breast cancer (125.2 per 100,000 women), followed by Asian and Pacific Island women (97.3 per 100,000), Hispanic (92.4 per 100,000), and American Indian and Alaska Native women (81.2 per 100,000). (healthline.com)
  • Black women have the lowest 5-year survival rate, at 77.5 percent, despite being the second most likely group to get breast cancer. (healthline.com)
  • In 2012, there were an estimated 1.7 million new cases of breast cancer worldwide. (healthline.com)
  • Women in developed countries generally have a much higher risk of developing breast cancer than women in middle- and low-income countries. (healthline.com)
  • North America and Western Europe have the highest likelihood of developing breast cancer, with over 90 women per 100,000 developing the disease. (healthline.com)
  • Women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were less likely to die of the disease if they regularly consumed a vitamin and mineral tablet compared with women who didn't take supplements, scientists have found in one of the largest studies of its kind. (newsday.com)
  • Almost all of these women took a multivitamin before they developed breast cancer," she added. (newsday.com)
  • So it's not like we're saying that once you get breast cancer, you should take multivitamins. (newsday.com)
  • Among participants, 7,728 developed invasive breast cancer, defined as a tumor that invades surrounding tissue. (newsday.com)
  • Dr. Janice Lu, director of medical oncology at Stony Brook University Hospital, who specializes in breast cancer, said the findings are intriguing because they echo results involving vitamin D research. (newsday.com)
  • This is very similar to a report on vitamin D, which was found to lower the risk of [a breast cancer] recurrence," Lu said. (newsday.com)
  • Similar unknowns pervade Wassertheil-Smoller's study, which is published in the current issue of Breast Cancer Research and Treatment. (newsday.com)
  • This is about women who already have breast cancer. (newsday.com)
  • Of these participants, 7,728 developed invasive breast cancer, a tumor that invades surrounding tissue. (newsday.com)
  • In the group with invasive breast cancer, nearly 40 percent of these were vitamin takers. (newsday.com)
  • For decades, researchers have concluded that when a woman seeks treatment for breast cancer and how advanced the disease is at that point are the most critical factors in determining whether she'll survive the disease. (npr.org)
  • Reams of data have indicated that less access to care and poor quality care are the main reasons black women die of breast cancer more often than whites. (npr.org)
  • Professor MARTIN TAMMEMAGI (Researcher): Our study shows that after more than 10 years of follow-up, more breast cancer patients die of other causes than they do of breast cancer itself. (npr.org)
  • He and his colleagues analyzed data on more than 900 black and white women diagnosed with breast cancer at Detroit's Henry Ford Health System between 1985 and 1990. (npr.org)
  • Prof. TAMMEMAGI: The African-Americans had roughly three times as much diabetes and three times as much hypertension as the white breast cancer patients had, and both of these were independent important predictors of survival. (npr.org)
  • All of the women were enrolled in the Henry Ford Health System, so that meant they all had access to the most effective treatment for breast cancer, which is surgery. (npr.org)
  • JONES: In fact, researchers estimated that more than 40 percent of the disparity in breast cancer survival for black women is directly contributed to these other illnesses. (npr.org)
  • Mays agrees with the study's focus on the need for more aggressive treatment of attended illnesses for black breast cancer patients. (npr.org)
  • Ms. MAYS: But in the interim, if what we're worried about is there seems to be this co-relationship with breast cancer, can we also attempt to do some kind of screening or ensuring that we really focus on self exams as well as the screening process to try and catch that particular disease early? (npr.org)
  • The notable exceptions to the typical age gradient are breast and prostate cancers, where five-year survival is highest in middle age, and bowel cancer, where five-year survival is similar between young and middle-aged adults. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • For these cancer types, survival is higher in the age groups targeted for screening (breast and bowel) or early diagnostic practices (prostate specific antigen [PSA] testing). (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Breast cancer deaths halved if patients given "wonder drug" tamoxifen for 10 years, not five,' reports the Daily Mail. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This headline is based on a study of the effectiveness and side effects of extended tamoxifen treatment in women with early-stage oestrogen-sensitive breast cancer. (www.nhs.uk)
  • As the name suggests, oestrogen-sensitive (ER) breast cancers are growths of cancerous cells that are stimulated by the hormone oestrogen. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This is because research has found that a long-term course of tamoxifen can reduce the risk of breast cancer returning (recurrence) and can also help prevent breast cancer deaths. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This may be of particular significance to younger women with early-onset breast cancer, where the potential impact of the recurrence of cancer in terms of life expectancy may be more of a concern. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Helpfully, all of the stories included the fact that tamoxifen is only effective for ER-positive breast cancers. (www.nhs.uk)
  • To assess the effectiveness of extended (10-year) versus standard (five-year) treatment, the researchers enrolled women with breast cancer who were currently receiving tamoxifen as part of their treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The researchers collected information each year on treatment status, breast cancer recurrence, any new cancers (including endometrial cancer, which is a known side effect of tamoxifen treatment), and deaths during the previous year. (www.nhs.uk)
  • We know that breastfeeding can lower breast cancer risk, especially if you breastfeed for longer than 1 year. (breastcancer.org)
  • A small Swedish study suggests more benefits for breastfeeding: Women diagnosed with breast cancer who gave birth and breastfed for longer than 6 months had better breast cancer survival compared to women who didn't give birth or breastfed for shorter periods of time. (breastcancer.org)
  • In the study, the researchers followed up with a group of 630 women aged 25 to 74 who were diagnosed with and treated for breast cancer from 1988 to 1992 in the counties of Kalmar and Ostergotland, Sweden. (breastcancer.org)
  • When the researchers started the study in 2004, 275 women had died, whether from breast cancer or other causes, and 10 women were in hospice care. (breastcancer.org)
  • The length of time the women breastfed and the number of pregnancies the women had were both linked to better breast cancer survival. (breastcancer.org)
  • The researchers found that women diagnosed with breast cancer who breastfed for longer than 6 months and/or had at least one pregnancy had better survival than women who breastfed for shorter periods of time or had no pregnancies. (breastcancer.org)
  • Still, these are highly individual decisions affected by many factors besides breast cancer and recurrence risk and whether you are able to breastfeed. (breastcancer.org)
  • Learn more about our commitment to providing complete, accurate, and private breast cancer information . (breastcancer.org)
  • lymphoma
  • The study involved more than 200 children and young adults with a blood cancer called Hodgkin lymphoma. (newsday.com)
  • The impact of improvements in treatment is particularly dramatic if we look at the trends in survival for leukaemia , which had survival of less than 40% in the 1970s and is now over 90%, while lymphoma survival has increased from 58% to more than 90% over the same period. (cancervic.org.au)
  • 1970s
  • Many of these improvements are attributable to the advent of chemotherapy in the 1970s, while in recent years survival continues to improve due to ongoing developments in use of targeted treatment protocols and new radiotherapy techniques. (cancervic.org.au)
  • overall survival
  • Data on some cancer sites was missing from the Danish data, and as this could affect overall survival estimates, Denmark was excluded from these overall analyses. (www.nhs.uk)
  • This was assessed against overall survival. (psychcentral.com)
  • You take overall survival from just under three years to almost five years," said Dr. Daniel Labow, a cancer surgeon at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City. (medicinenet.com)
  • Meanwhile, a second preliminary study from the Netherlands found that combining chemotherapy and radiation therapy before pancreatic cancer surgery extended overall survival, particularly for those patients whose tumors were successfully removed. (medicinenet.com)
  • Average overall survival was a little more than 54 months with the four-drug chemo versus 35 months with the single drug, researchers found. (medicinenet.com)
  • The Netherlands trial, led by Dr. Geertjan Van Tienhoven of the Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam, focused on chemotherapy and radiation therapy before pancreatic cancer surgery, to improve the odds of surgery and increase overall survival. (medicinenet.com)
  • Average overall survival was roughly 17 months for people who received preoperative chemo and radiation therapy, compared to less than 14 months for those who underwent immediate surgery, researchers reported. (medicinenet.com)
  • detection
  • People who participate in regular screenings have a better chance of early detection - and therefore a better chance of survival. (moffitt.org)
  • Both studies offer hope for people with a cancer that typically evades early detection and is incredibly difficult to treat, ASCO President Dr. Bruce Johnson said. (medicinenet.com)
  • women
  • The researchers found that women who lived in deprived areas were more likely to have p53 mutations, and were less likely to have survived cancer-free. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Sept. 29, 2009 -- Younger women with advanced colon cancer live slightly longer than younger men with advanced disease, but the survival advantage disappears as women age and their estrogen levels drop, a new study shows. (webmd.com)
  • Survival times were about equal for women and men between the ages of 45 and 54. (webmd.com)
  • But as a group, older women (55 years and older) with cancer that had spread beyond the colon or rectum had a shorter survival than men -- seven months vs. nine months. (webmd.com)
  • The survival advantage among young women was seen in all ethnic groups, and the gender disparity was greatest among younger patients treated after 1999. (webmd.com)
  • Fewer women in England lived for five years after being diagnosed with cervical cancer (58.6pc) despite a national screening programme. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Yang noted that the advantages for women with good relationships held true even though the researchers took into account the patients' depression levels, cancer stage, treatment, and other factors that could have influenced the results. (psychcentral.com)
  • Women in both groups started the study with high and nearly equal levels of cancer-related stress. (psychcentral.com)
  • But women in good marriages saw steady reductions in their cancer-related stress, while women in distressed marriages had a much slower recovery. (psychcentral.com)
  • Men and women who have never been married are more likely to die from cancer, according to new research published in the journal BMC Public Health. (redorbit.com)
  • Within that community, Japanese women have the highest survival rate (93 percent) and Filipina women the lowest (89 percent). (healthline.com)
  • Non-Hispanic white women have the second highest 5-year survival rate, at 88.8 percent, followed by American Indian and Alaska Native women (85.6 percent), Pacific Islander women (85.4 percent), and Hispanic women (83.8 percent). (healthline.com)
  • The new women's results also fly in the face of the Iowa Women's study, which two years ago found that older women who took a daily vitamin supplement had an increased risk of dying of cardiovascular disease and cancer. (newsday.com)
  • 1 ] In women, five-year survival ranges from 81% to 33% in the same age groups. (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • 1 ] In women, one-year survival has increased from 44% to 71% over the same time period (a difference of 27 percentage points). (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • 1 ] In women, five-year survival has increased from 28% to 56% over the same time period (a difference of 28 percentage points). (cancerresearchuk.org)
  • Better known for causing birth defects in the children of women who took it for morning sickness, it has found a second life as a cancer drug. (nytimes.com)
  • They did in fact find that cancer recurrence was lower in women receiving 10 years of treatment compared with women getting the standard five years of treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Previous research on women with ER-positive breasr cancer has shown that women who receive tamoxifen for five years have a lower risk of the cancer recurring than those who have no treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The ER status of these women varied: 6,048 women either had ER-negative cancer or their ER status was unknown. (www.nhs.uk)
  • 100,000
  • Of the 12 drugs approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for various cancers in 2012, 11 were priced above $100,000 per year, which the article contends is not only unsustainable, it's perhaps even immoral. (timesunion.com)
  • rectal cancer
  • About 150,000 new cases of colon or rectal cancer will be diagnosed in the United States this year, and nine out of 10 cases will occur in people over the age of 50, according to the American Cancer Society (ACS). (webmd.com)
  • time
  • Since cancer treatment generally is conducted over a period of months, and mood varies with time, it's possible the researchers did not obtain a broad enough time sample. (psychcentral.com)
  • Through gene profile analyses of patients, the researchers documented that the association between patient psychological condition and survival time may stem from a dysregulation in inflammatory biology. (cnn.com)
  • In fact, some patients live much longer than the amount of time that would be anticipated based on the survival rate alone. (moffitt.org)
  • In addition, the four-drug regimen nearly doubled the time before pancreatic cancer recurrence (almost 22 months versus nearly 13 months) and the cancer's spread to other organs (around 30 months versus 17 months). (medicinenet.com)
  • These are four drugs that have already been around for a long time, but in this combination the four-drug regimen has been definitely a huge benefit for pancreas cancer," Labow said. (medicinenet.com)
  • Survival for Victorian children diagnosed with cancer is at an all-time high, with a report released by Cancer Council Victoria today showing overall five-year cancer survival in children under the age of 15 years has increased from 68% in 1982 to 82% in 2010. (cancervic.org.au)
  • affects
  • Earlier studies had documented attitude as having some probably impact in surviving cancer, but the present study says neither positive nor negative attitude affects survival in head and neck cancer patients. (psychcentral.com)
  • The belief that emotional well-being affects survival, nonetheless, has been remarkably resilient in the face of contrary data. (psychcentral.com)
  • rate
  • Survival in England has only increased at a similar rate to other European countries and has not caught up with the absolute values seen elsewhere," it said. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • At this point, the 5-year survival rate is very high: between 98.8 and 100 percent . (healthline.com)
  • The pancreatic cancer survival rate continues to improve as research leads to new and better ways to diagnose and treat the condition. (moffitt.org)
  • However, when discussing the survival rate, it's important to remember that it is nothing more than a statistic. (moffitt.org)
  • Of course, a pancreatic cancer patient might be interested in learning as much as he or she can about the condition, including its survival rate. (moffitt.org)
  • If you have questions about the pancreatic cancer survival rate, call 1-888- 663-3488 or request to schedule an appointment online. (moffitt.org)
  • Last year, older men who received vitamins in a large study -- a clinical trial -- experienced an 8 percent lower rate of most forms of cancer. (newsday.com)
  • The five-year survival rate was higher for patients treated by a gynecologic oncologist, senior author Dr. Ate G. J. van der Zee, from the University Medical Center Groningen, and colleagues note. (redorbit.com)
  • What is a 5-year survival rate? (cancer.org)
  • The 5-year survival rate is the percentage of people who live at least 5 years after being diagnosed with cancer. (cancer.org)
  • For example, a 5-year survival rate of 50% means that an estimated 50 out of 100 people who have that cancer are still alive 5 years after being diagnosed. (cancer.org)
  • For example, if the 5-year relative survival rate for a specific type and stage of cancer is 50%, it means that people who have that cancer are, on average, about 50% as likely as people who don't have that cancer to live for at least 5 years after being diagnosed. (cancer.org)
  • The study found that in the worst case-stomach cancer-the five year survival rate among British patients was less than half the European average. (bmj.com)
  • treatment
  • American Cancer Society Director of Prostate and Colorectal Cancers Durado Brooks, MD, calls the study "intriguing," but he says its relevance for colorectal treatment remains to be determined. (webmd.com)
  • We have good evidence that survival for lung cancer has been compromised by long waiting lists for radiotherapy treatment. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • In this study, patients who received [complementary medicine] were more likely to refuse additional [conventional cancer treatment], and had a higher risk of death. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • For patients with curable cancers who are inclined to pursue complementary treatment methods, timely adherence to all recommended conventional therapies should be strongly advised. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • This study suggests that stress management should be an integral part of cancer treatment. (cnn.com)
  • It also suggests that stress management should be an integral part of the treatment for cancer and perhaps even all inflammatory diseases. (cnn.com)
  • With designated teams delving deeper each day into how cancer develops, spreads and responds to treatment, we're gaining invaluable insight that continually brings us closer to a cure. (moffitt.org)
  • Unrealistic patient expectations are concerning because active treatment does not provide a survival advantage compared with men who choose active surveillance when these patients are carefully chosen, and active treatment can be associated with erectile dysfunction and urinary incontinence . (healthcentral.com)
  • Alonzo was one of many young cancer patients who couldn't get a key medicine during treatment because of a national drug shortage. (newsday.com)
  • Young cancer patients who couldn't get a key medicine because of a national drug shortage were more likely to suffer a relapse than others who were able to get the preferred treatment, doctors report. (newsday.com)
  • It's the first evidence that a long-standing drug-supply problem probably has affected cancer treatment results in specific patients. (newsday.com)
  • Reasons include manufacturing and contamination problems, plant shutdowns, and fewer makers and lower profits for certain drugs, especially generics infused during surgery or cancer treatment. (newsday.com)
  • Only 75 percent of those given the substitute drug stayed free of cancer for two years versus 88 percent who received the preferred treatment. (newsday.com)
  • Cancer Council Victoria CEO, Todd Harper , said the improvement in survival highlights the improvements made in treatment over the last 30 years. (cancervic.org.au)
  • The PICS framework ensure patients with similar cancer diagnoses are treated and monitored according to detailed paediatric treatment guidelines,' said Mr Harper. (cancervic.org.au)
  • adults
  • Germany has national cancer coverage for children, but only 1.3% of adults are covered. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Understand more about when cancer is diagnosed in children, teen and young adults and how to manage the needs of the child, family, friends and community. (cancervic.org.au)
  • Chemo
  • A four-drug chemo "cocktail" extended surgical patients' lives by nearly two years over the current standard single-drug chemo regimen for pancreatic cancer , a clinical trial out of France has shown. (medicinenet.com)
  • After four weeks on the substitute chemo, Abby's cancer had returned and spread to more places, her mother said. (newsday.com)
  • five years
  • The survey found that 33 percent of respondents expected to live fewer than five years if their cancer was left untreated, 41 percent said five to 10 years, 21 percent said 10 to 20 years, and 5 percent said more than 20 years. (healthcentral.com)
  • 1995
  • Overall, the data covered an average of about 151,400,000 members of the population (not just those who developed cancer) from 1995 to 1999, which is about 35% of the total population of these countries. (www.nhs.uk)
  • The paper on overall five-year survival described the results of the analysis of about 3m adult cancer cases that were diagnosed between 1995 and 1999 and followed until the end of 2003. (www.nhs.uk)
  • less
  • This report shows that over 95% of the 159 children diagnosed with cancer in 2010 were diagnosed at one of the specialist paediatric oncology centres and less than 5% of Victorian children are treated wholly at hospitals outside the PICS. (cancervic.org.au)