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  • carbonate
  • Cadmium (Latin cadmia, Greek καδμεία meaning "calamine", a cadmium-bearing mixture of minerals that was named after the Greek mythological character Κάδμος, Cadmus, the founder of Thebes) was discovered simultaneously in 1817 by Friedrich Stromeyer and Karl Samuel Leberecht Hermann, both in Germany, as an impurity in zinc carbonate. (wikipedia.org)
  • copper
  • Most cadmium used in the United States is extracted during the production of other metals like zinc, lead, and copper. (cdc.gov)
  • Most cadmium produced is electroplated onto steel , iron , copper , brass, and other alloys to protect them from corrosion . (britannica.com)
  • Context - Cadmium is produced mainly as a by-product of mining, smelting and refining of zinc , lead and copper. (greenfacts.org)
  • The Pca1 degron bound copper, and this interaction was competed by cadmium. (sciencemag.org)
  • coatings
  • Workers can be exposed to cadmium in air from the smelting and refining of metals, or from the air in plants that make cadmium products such as batteries, coatings, or plastics. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is used as an electrolyte for electrodeposition of thin metallic cadmium coatings on metal to protect against corrosion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plated cadmium has a smaller grain size than electro-zinc coatings, and deposits tend to be more uniform and smooth. (britannica.com)
  • Consequently, good protection is afforded by thin coatings of cadmium, and thus, in spite of its high price, it is frequently used for the protection of precision parts. (britannica.com)
  • kidneys
  • The critical health effect of cadmium is on the kidneys where it damages the blood filtration system of the kidneys, which results in proteins being excreted in urine. (greenfacts.org)
  • Cadmium is mainly stored in the liver and kidneys. (greenfacts.org)
  • metals
  • Cadmium and its congeners in group 12 are often not considered transition metals, in that they do not have partly filled d or f electron shells in the elemental or common oxidation states. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike most other metals, cadmium is resistant to corrosion and is used as a protective plate on other metals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cadmium and its congeners are not always considered transition metals, in that they do not have partly filled d or f electron shells in the elemental or common oxidation states. (wikipedia.org)
  • ores
  • Cadmium occurs as a minor component in most zinc ores and is a byproduct of zinc production. (wikipedia.org)
  • It occurs in nature with two different crystal structures as the rare minerals greenockite and hawleyite , but is more prevalent as an impurity substituent in the similarly structured zinc ores sphalerite and wurtzite , which are the major economic sources of cadmium. (wikipedia.org)
  • halides
  • The method involved the use of the following preparations: semicarbazide hydrochloride, urea, and cadmium halides. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stabilization
  • Release from the ER was not required for Pca1 stabilization or degradation, as Pca1 was efficiently degraded in yeast defective in ER exit, and cadmium promoted its stabilization. (sciencemag.org)
  • fertilizers
  • All soils and rocks, including coal and mineral fertilizers, contain some cadmium. (cdc.gov)
  • Most soil and rocks, including coal and mineral fertilizers, contain some cadmium. (cdc.gov)
  • minerals
  • This structural similarity of cadmium dicyanide and cristobalite was foundational in the development of mineralomimetic chemistry: "the build-up of mineral-like structures using materials that never give stable minerals. (wikipedia.org)