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  • circuitry
  • Fisher and her colleagues studied the brain circuitry of romantic love by fMRI-scanning the brains of forty-nine men and women: seventeen who had just fallen madly in love, fifteen who had just been dumped, and seventeen who reported that they were still in love after an average of twenty-one years of marriage. (wikipedia.org)
  • reproductive
  • Available research data showed that dental work involving mercury may be an occupational hazard with respect to reproductive processes, glioblastoma (brain cancer), renal function changes, allergies, and immunotoxicological effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • behavior
  • Many are concerned that in addition to the obsession with smart devices, the behavior among young people may lead to immediate effects on the brain and the possible long-term consequences of such habits. (psychcentral.com)
  • The scientists studied the density of their brains' axons, the nerve endings that transport neurotransmitters, in slices of the basal ganglia, a portion of the striatum, a region key to the neural pathways controlling movement, learning and social behavior. (upi.com)
  • As these patterns become reinforced through natural selection, shifting brain chemistry could have encouraged cooperation and social learning, the type of behavior that enabled group hunting, tool usage and the development of language. (upi.com)
  • glutamate
  • Khaitovich says the comparison confirms the key role played in human thought by glutamate , a chemical that energises brain cells and ferries messages between them. (newscientist.com)
  • Brain metabolism probably played an important role in evolution of human cognition," Khaitovich says, "and one of the potentially most important changes was in glutamate metabolism. (newscientist.com)
  • For the study, Allen and his colleagues examined MRI images and recorded glutamate activity in the thalamus, the part of the brain involved with the regulation of consciousness, sleep and alertness. (prohealth.com)
  • Allen says the lack of daytime sleepiness is likely related to the role of glutamate, too much of which can put the brain in a state of hyperarousal - day or night. (prohealth.com)
  • Allen says there are already drugs on the market, such as the anticonvulsive gabapentin enacarbil, that can reduce glutamate levels in the brain, but they have not been given as a first-line treatment for RLS patients. (prohealth.com)
  • explains
  • In this engaging series of videos, Dr. David Eagleman explains the basics of brain function, and describes how this extremely complex, often misunderstood organ defines who we are. (bioedonline.org)
  • Women who had more pronounced responses in their stress response mechanisms during brain imaging also showed alterations in hormones, like cortisol, that are sometimes over-secreted in depression," Zubieta explains. (rxpgnews.com)
  • serotonin
  • 4 While this inflammation often leads to diabetes, cancer, and heart disease, it also affects the brain by interfering with the production and release of serotonin . (lifeextension.com)
  • 6,7 Lowering tryptophan levels triggers a corresponding drop in brain serotonin production and can impact mood, impair memory, and increase aggression. (lifeextension.com)
  • receptors
  • Not much evidence existed until recently to support claims that receptors in the brain can be significantly physically altered from what they were at birth due to genetics. (psychcentral.com)
  • chemical
  • When your brain is balanced, you are creating the exact right amount of each chemical, and you'll feel energetic, creative, and calm, and will have the ability to reset your brain with restful sleep at night. (pathmed.com)
  • An altered level of consciousness can result from a variety of factors, including alterations in the chemical environment of the brain (e.g. exposure to poisons or intoxicants), insufficient oxygen or blood flow in the brain, and excessive pressure within the skull. (wikipedia.org)
  • After his death, Thudichum's discoveries were realized to be important scientific contributions to the study of the chemical and molecular composition of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • New research uncovers molecular changes in the brain that are specific to chronic fatigue syndrome and Gulf War illness - two conditions that were believed to be purely psychological until recently. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • New research , however, offers hope for prompter and more accurate diagnoses of the illness, as molecular changes in the brain are discovered. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Dr. Braverman is a Summa Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa graduate of Brandeis University and NYU Medical School, did brain research at Harvard Medical School, and trained at an affiliate of Yale Medical School. (pathmed.com)
  • Bjørklund has imparted knowledge about the research on mercury with regard to various brain diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since 1974 the "Thudichum Medal Lecture" is awarded in England for outstanding achievements in the field of neurochemistry, and at Yale University, the "Thudichum Post-Doctoral Research Fellowship in Neuro-oncology" was founded within the fields of cell biology, neurochemistry and adult stem cell research to support the study of brain tumors A collection of his papers are held at the National Library of Medicine in Bethesda, Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research on animals finds that environmental enrichment could aid the treatment and recovery of numerous brain-related dysfunctions, including Alzheimer's disease and those connected to aging, whereas a lack of stimulation might impair cognitive development. (wikipedia.org)
  • His research, however, did not investigate the brain nor use standardized impoverished and enriched environments. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2005, she was hired by match.com to help build chemistry.com, which used her research and experience to create both hormone-based and personality-based matching systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Science of Seduction, where she discussed her most recent research on brain chemistry and romantic love. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • Dementia is a broad category of brain diseases that cause a long-term and often gradual decrease in the ability to think and remember that is great enough to affect a person's daily functioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • dysfunction
  • Indeed, the behavioral branch of psychology dispensed altogether with what actually happened inside the brain, regarding most mental dysfunction as what could be dubbed as "software" errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • body's
  • Other means of ingestion such as vaporizing, injecting, or insufflating the drug can produce powerful hallucinations for a short time (usually less than half an hour), as the DMT reaches the brain before it can be metabolized by the body's natural monoamine oxidase. (wikipedia.org)
  • colleagues
  • In a new study, Hyung Suk Seo, M.D., professor of neuroradiology at Korea University in Seoul, South Korea, and colleagues used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to gain unique insight into the brains of smartphone- and internet-addicted teenagers. (psychcentral.com)
  • occurs
  • This effect of environmental richness upon the brain occurs whether it is experienced immediately following birth, after weaning, or during maturity. (wikipedia.org)
  • signals
  • To make out one image or the other, the brain must inhibit neural signals to push one out of visual awareness. (eurekalert.org)
  • Social
  • This work was funded by a Harvard Milton Fund award, a NARSAD Young Investigator award, an MIT-MGH Strategic Partnership grant, and a grant from the Simons Center for the Social Brain. (eurekalert.org)
  • Environmental enrichment is the stimulation of the brain by its physical and social surroundings. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • They used a brain-imaging technique that the U-M team has previously used to see how the brain responds to pain and to placebo pain treatment. (rxpgnews.com)
  • He is acknowledged worldwide as an expert in brain-based diagnosis and treatment, and he lectures to and trains doctors in anti-aging medicine. (pathmed.com)
  • A treatise on gall-stones: their chemistry, pathology, and treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • findings
  • It's long been thought this might have something to do with inhibition in the brain, and our findings lend support to this notion. (eurekalert.org)
  • parts
  • The Brain - Which parts of the body govern movement, thinking and the senses? (bioedonline.org)
  • Among the non-depressed women, the mu-opioid system was actually less active in some parts of the brain than it had been before they recalled sad memories. (rxpgnews.com)
  • physical
  • Amazing, that early experiences can have such an impact on the developing physical brain. (psychcentral.com)
  • Short of the eventual physical decline of aging in the brain structure, are there other experiences which significantly alter the actual organic brain? (psychcentral.com)
  • Psychology
  • The first half of the 20th century saw psychology and psychiatry as largely phenomenological, in that behaviors or themes which were observed in patients could often be correlated to a limited variety of factors such as childhood experience, inherited tendencies, or injury to specific brain areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • guide
  • Elizabeth Kolbert on "The Teenage Brain: A Neuroscientist's Survival Guide to Raising Adolescents and Young Adults," by Frances Jensen. (scoop.it)
  • cells
  • The results showed different responses and demonstrated the possible distribution of different controlling cells with the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Joel Elkes (pronounced el' kez) (12 November 1913, Königsberg - 30 October 2015, Sarasota) was a leading medical researcher specialising in the chemistry of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The progress of medical chemistry comprising its application to physiology", Bailliere, Tindall and Cox, 1896. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the medical literature, idiopathic hypersomnia may also be referred to as IH, IHS, primary hypersomnia, central hypersomnia, or hypersomnia of brain origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • calm
  • Scientists don't fully understand why drugs that increase the amount of dopamine in the brain would work to calm the uncontrollable leg movement of RLS. (prohealth.com)
  • function
  • Neuropsychopharmacology supersedes psychopharmacology in the areas of "how" and "why", and additionally addresses other issues of brain function. (wikipedia.org)
  • memory
  • The other GWI group, however, presented neither changes to heart rate nor brainstem atrophy, but its members seemed to require additional brain areas in order to perform a memory task. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • nerve
  • The scientists studied the density of their brains' axons, the nerve endings that transport neurotransmitters, in slices of the basal ganglia, a portion of the striatum, a region key to the neural pathways controlling movement, learning and social behavior. (upi.com)
  • behaviors
  • A brain that is still developing, but is having to cope with the effects of unfamiliar hormones, can help explain why teens are more susceptible to risk-taking behaviors such as experimenting with drugs and alcohol. (teenrehab.org)
  • The first half of the 20th century saw psychology and psychiatry as largely phenomenological, in that behaviors or themes which were observed in patients could often be correlated to a limited variety of factors such as childhood experience, inherited tendencies, or injury to specific brain areas. (wikipedia.org)
  • drugs
  • Scientists don't fully understand why drugs that increase the amount of dopamine in the brain would work to calm the uncontrollable leg movement of RLS. (prohealth.com)
  • effects
  • Normally, stupor and coma are produced by interference with the brain stem, such as can be caused by a lesion or indirect effects, such as brain herniation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mass lesions in the brain stem normally cause coma due to their effects on the reticular formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Central
  • In the medical literature, idiopathic hypersomnia may also be referred to as IH, IHS, primary hypersomnia, central hypersomnia, or hypersomnia of brain origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • understand
  • Since teens might be more susceptible to risk taking and experimenting with substances, it's important to understand how substances can affect a developing brain. (teenrehab.org)