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  • differentiate
  • Bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs) have the capacity to differentiate into mature cell types of multiple tissues. (hindawi.com)
  • In this study, we demonstrated that female rat BMSCs could differentiate into steroidogenic cells with the capacity for de novo synthesis of Estradiol-17 β (E2) under high glucose culture conditions with or without retinoic acid (RA). (hindawi.com)
  • They can differentiate into many cell types including bone, fat, and muscle which allow them to treat a large range of disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • ESCs possess many of the same therapeutic properties as MSCs, including the ability to self-regenerate and differentiate into a number of cell lineages. (wikipedia.org)
  • From least- to terminally-differentiated, the chondrocytic lineage is: Colony-forming unit-fibroblast (CFU-F) Mesenchymal stem cell / marrow stromal cell (MSC) Chondrocyte Hypertrophic chondrocyte Mesenchymal (mesoderm origin) stem cells (MSC) are undifferentiated, meaning they can differentiate into a variety of generative cells commonly known as osteochondrogenic (or osteogenic, chondrogenic, osteoprogenitor, etc.) cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • These chondrogenic cells differentiate into so-called chondroblasts, which then synthesize the cartilage extra cellular matrix (ECM), consisting of a ground substance (proteoglycans, glycosaminoglycans for low osmotic potential) and fibers. (wikipedia.org)
  • If the cause for the low platelet count remains unclear, a bone marrow biopsy is usually recommended to differentiate cases of decreased platelet production from cases of peripheral platelet destruction. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Dr. David Steenblock of Mission Viejo, California, a pioneer in clinical applications of stem cells , is pleased to report the results of a 16 year old girl who suffered from cerebral palsy . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Doctors at the hospital had been preparing to start a clinical trial with stem cells. (nytimes.com)
  • He said that many centers were planning clinical trials of stem cell therapy, based on recent data from animals, and that the fact that an operation had now been tried was ''not a real surprise -- it only happened because this teenager had this unfortunate accident. (nytimes.com)
  • Despite the regenerative powers of stem cells, much remains to be understood about their properties and how best to put them to clinical use. (nytimes.com)
  • April 11, 2013 - Researchers from the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), have launched a Phase I clinical trial of CD34+ bone marrow stem cells (BMSC) for people with retinal conditions that cause vision loss from ischemia, or loss of blood flow, and cell degeneration. (blindness.org)
  • Clinical and animal studies have been conducted into the use of stem cells in cases of spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among several clinical trials that have reported that adult stem-cell therapy is safe and effective, powerful effects have been reported from only a few laboratories, infarcts as well as heart failure not arising from myocardial infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • efficacy
  • Ongoing exploration of cell-based therapy for ischemic cardiomyopathy is indicated with larger studies with adequate sample size to provide definitive assessment of safety and to assess efficacy of this new therapeutic approach. (acc.org)
  • Measuring the effectiveness of HDL stimulated by these new drugs remains a challenge in drug development, and the finding that HDL may suppress stem cell proliferation and decrease white cell counts gives researchers a new method for assessing the efficacy of new HDL-raising drugs. (scitech-news.com)
  • proliferate
  • Whereas the GCSF protein, as expected, stimulated such stem cells to proliferate and start maturing towards adult white blood cells, the GCSF-mimicking antibody had a markedly different effect. (scitechdaily.com)
  • When referring to bone, or in this case cartilage, the originally undifferentiated mesenchymal stem cells lose their pluripotency, proliferate and crowd together in a dense aggregate of chondrogenic cells (cartilage) at the location of chondrification. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • Study authors say they observed reduced production of osteoblasts and other stroma cells in the endosteum of older mice. (eurekalert.org)
  • In their study, excess numbers of stems cells in the bone marrow of mice accelerated the disease's progression. (scitech-news.com)
  • In a world first, researchers from New Zealand have observed mitochondrial DNA moving between cells in mice and triggering cancer growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • After two days of this cellular exercise regimen, the researchers found a significant increase in the expression of a group of genes that control tensile strength compared with cells that were not stretched. (berkeley.edu)
  • The role of bone marrow stem cells was a surprise, says the study's lead investigator, Alan Tall, MD, the Tilden-Weger-Bieler Professor of Medicine, professor of physiology and cellular biophysics, and director of the Cardiovascular Research Initiative at Columbia University Medical Center. (scitech-news.com)
  • While usually situated on the periphery of the cellular membrane, these unique structures display a polarized pattern of distribution in migrating cells, situating at the front border between the lamellipodium and lamellum. (wikipedia.org)
  • cartilage
  • Chondrocytes (from Greek χόνδρος, chondros = cartilage + κύτος, kytos = cell) are the only cells found in healthy cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • regenerative
  • Mesenchymal stem cells also exerted regenerative and antifibrotic effects within the myocardium, and these effects are associated with improved functional capacity and quality of life. (acc.org)
  • Stem cells are special regenerative cells with which the body replaces or repairs its own tissues. (nytimes.com)
  • Several different forms of stem cells have been identified and studied in the field of regenerative medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, an ideal treatment must possess both immunomodulating properties to control irregular autoimmune responses to prevent further damage and regenerative properties to stimulate natural repair mechanisms and replace damaged cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • This research uses bone marrow cells to fuse with a patient tissues so that nothing transplanted is rejected by our immune systems, and brings universal graft survival closer to reality. (redorbit.com)
  • These first 100 days are critical for Ronda's body as the stem cells do most of their work and her immune system begins to rebuild and modulate. (gofundme.com)
  • Characteristic features of neuroinflammation in chronic pain conditions include infiltration of immune cells into the PNS [e.g., the sciatic nerve and dorsal root ganglion (DRG)], activation of glial cells such as microglia and astrocytes in the CNS (spinal cord and brain), and production and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines [TNF, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, CCL2, and CXCL (rutgers.edu)
  • Our study points to exciting novel ways to have a better immune system and possibly less blood cancer upon aging by therapeutically targeting the place where blood stem cells form. (eurekalert.org)
  • Natural antibodies are large, Y-shaped proteins produced by immune cells. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Many different specialized cells exhibit these dynamic structures such as invasive cancer cells, osteoclasts, vascular smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and certain immune cells like macrophages and dendritic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • Cancer epigenetics is the study of epigenetic modifications to the DNA of cancer cells that do not involve a change in the nucleotide sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in cancer cells, CpG islands preceding tumor suppressor gene promoters are often hypermethylated, while CpG methylation of oncogene promoter regions and parasitic repeat sequences is often decreased. (wikipedia.org)
  • Indeed, cancer cells can become addicted to the transcriptional silencing, due to promoter hypermethylation, of some key tumor suppressor genes, a process known as epigenetic addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • In fact, cancer cell genomes have 20-50% less methylation at individual CpG dinucleotides across the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • In cancer cells "global hypomethylation" due to disruption in DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) may promote mitotic recombination and chromosome rearrangement, ultimately resulting in aneuploidy when the chromosomes fail to separate properly during mitosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • laboratory
  • A special laboratory technique is used to isolate the CD34+ BMSC from the extracted cell sample. (blindness.org)
  • Stem cells are processed in our specialised stem cell laboratory. (guysandstthomas.nhs.uk)
  • Since the 1980s, molecular biologists have known how to produce antibodies in cell cultures in the laboratory. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Last year, in a study spearheaded by TSRI Research Associate Hongkai Zhang, Lerner's laboratory devised a new antibody-discovery technique-in which antibodies are produced in mammalian cells along with receptors or other target molecules of interest. (scitechdaily.com)
  • found
  • In another surprise, they found that HDL (a.k.a. "good cholesterol") - already well-known for its role in removing LDL ("bad" cholesterol) from arteries - also helps prevent atherosclerosis by suppressing bone marrow stem cell proliferation. (scitech-news.com)
  • Indeed in the hematopoietic lineage, it has been found that HOXA9 is preferentially expressed in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), and is down-regulated as the cell differentiates and matures further. (wikipedia.org)
  • In healthy cells, CpG dinucleotides of lower densities are found within coding and non-coding intergenic regions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Podosomes are conical, actin-rich structures found on the outer surface of the plasma membrane of animal cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiomyocytes
  • Cardiomyocytes (muscle cells of the heart) were thought to be terminally differentiated cells that were irreplaceable and thus required to maintain cardiac function throughout life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cells then move to affected areas where they can reverse some of the damage by generating a new population of cardiomyocytes. (wikipedia.org)