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  • biopsy
  • Since the diagnosis of these bone abnormalities cannot be obtained correctly by current clinical, biochemical, and imaging methods (including measurement of bone-mineral density), bone biopsy has been, and still remains, the gold standard analysis for assessing the exact type of renal osteodystrophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • skull
  • Paget's disease may affect any one or multiple bones of the body (most commonly pelvis, femur, and lumbar vertebrae, and skull), but never the entire skeleton, and does not spread from bone to bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paget's disease affecting the skull may lead to loss of hearing in one or both ears due to compression of the nerves in the inner ear. (wikipedia.org)
  • prove
  • The disease may stabilize after a number of years, go into spontaneous remission, or, in cases involving the chest and upper spine, prove fatal. (wikipedia.org)
  • However
  • However, about 10-15 percent of people that develop the disease without any family history also have a mutation in the SQSTM1 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • They further stated that their histopathological study provided good evidence that osteolytic changes seen in Gorham's disease are the result of hyperactive osteoclastic bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • A continuous long-term infusion gives a net decrease in trabecular bone volume, whereas daily single injections result in a net increase. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • condition
  • Following organizations serve the condition "Gorham's Disease" for support, advocacy or research. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Anonymously share and see how your answers compare with others with this condition while privately providing key pieces of information to medical researchers, disease advocacy groups, and others ONLY YOU select to help speed up cures and better alternatives. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • specific
  • Takara's Bone Specific Alkaline Phosphatase (Rat) Polyclonal Antibody was raised against a conjugate of the KLH ( keyhole limpet hemocyanin) immunogen and the peptide (20-49) [PEKEKDPKYWRDQAQETLKYALELQKLNTN], which is highly conserved between human and rat bone specific alkaline phosphatase. (clontech.com)
  • The disease has no specific predilection for age, gender, or race. (diseaseinfosearch.org)
  • Two genes, SQSTM1 and RANK, and specific regions of chromosome 5 and 6 are associated with Paget's disease of bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Mild or early cases of Pagets are asymptomatic, and so most people are diagnosed with Paget's disease incidentally during medical evaluation for another problem. (wikipedia.org)
  • lead
  • Gorham and Stout found that vascular anomalies always occupied space that normally would be filled with new bone and speculated that the presence of angiomatosis may lead to chemical changes in the bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic dental problems may lead to infection of the jaw bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • Laboratory contamination may have played a role in past studies linking paramyxovirus (e.g. measles) to Paget's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • cartilage
  • In osteoarthritis , because the weight distribution across the knee or hip joints is uneven, the bone beneath the cartilage thickens on the compression side of the joint and atrophies on the extension side. (britannica.com)
  • Epiphysiodesis (the fixing of the epiphysis to the bone shaft) is aimed at temporary or permanent cessation of growth in a metaphyseal cartilage. (britannica.com)
  • Osteochondrodysplasia is a general term for a disorder of the development of bone and cartilage. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014 a separate endowment established by Rolanette and Charles Berdon Lawrence and others made it possible for the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston to join the program, bringing expertise in cartilage biology, bone biomechanics and cranial-facial bone biology to the program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Barbara J Stoll, M.D., Member of the Board The goal of the program is to stimulate advances in basic and clinical aspects of bone and cartilage disorders across the Texas Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • A malignant bone tumor that arises from cartilage cells and is most common about the hip, pelvis and shoulder. (dmoztools.net)
  • Rare cancer group offering support and information for those with Mesenchymal Chrondrosarcoma, a disease of the embryonic cartilage. (dmoztools.net)
  • disorders
  • For orthopaedists, emphasis is placed on operative and non-operative management of all problems of musculoskeletal disorders, including diseases of the lumbar spine, trauma, orthopaedic oncology, and degenerative diseases. (hss.edu)
  • such as function of thyroid, parathyroid, liver and kidney disrupts metabolic changes as well as function of specific organs, which in turn leads to condition that are not desirable such as bone disorders or other endocrine related diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • These disorders are to be differentiated from a larger group of genetic bone disorders where there is a defect in a specific signaling system or cell type that causes the bone disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • These observational studies have broadened the focus of CKD-related mineral and bone disorders (MBDs) to include cardiovascular disease (which is the leading cause of death in patients at all stages of CKD). (wikipedia.org)
  • osteomalacia
  • When the normal composition of bone tissue is altered by deficient mineralization of the organic matrix, the condition is called rickets in children and osteomalacia in adults. (britannica.com)
  • WHY TO AVOID BISPHOSPHONATES in patients with cystic fibrosis Etidronate (Didronel) Pamidronate (Aredia) Alendronate (Fosamax) May cause osteomalacia Patients with C.F. already prone to this May inhibit primary modeling of growing bone Safety in children not established only reported in a few cases should do bone biopsies if done on research basis Half-life in bone is >10 years! (washington.edu)
  • Deficiency in Vitamin D or renal disease contributes to bone disorder such as in Osteomalacia in adult and Rickets in children. (wikipedia.org)
  • Osteomalacia is the softening of bones due to poor bone mineralization which is in turn due to poor calcium absorption. (wikipedia.org)
  • density
  • Your bones normally reach their maximum mass at age 25 to 30 after which they gradually lose density. (livestrong.com)
  • it represents an attempt at structural strengthening by thickening of bony trabeculae, but its X-ray appearance may be confused with that of dead bone, retaining its density while adjacent normal bone has become osteopenic. (britannica.com)
  • This is a review of published literature that reports spinal bone density in either T or Z scores. (washington.edu)
  • Low serum bone gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein concentrations in patients with cystic fibrosis: correlation with hormonal parameters and bone mineral density. (washington.edu)
  • Bone mineral density and body composition in adult patients with cystic fibrosis. (washington.edu)
  • Bone density in children and adolescents with cystic fibrosis. (washington.edu)
  • The hormone produced by the thyroid gland has big impact on bone density, blood calcium levee. (wikipedia.org)
  • The components include basic laboratory programs at the three institutions that include core facilities (bone density, small animal CT facilities, microCT, biomechanical testing and bone histomorphometric facilities) that are available to members of the program from all institutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • For larger bone lesions, treatment may include medication, physical therapy and/or surgery. (livestrong.com)
  • Multiple myeloma (MM) is a malignancy of plasma cells characterized by growth in the bone marrow (BM) environment and the development of lytic lesions in the skeleton. (springer.com)
  • The hallmark of MM bone disease is the development of osteolytic lesions without associated osteoblastic activity. (springer.com)
  • Epigenetic events guiding transformations of the surrounding BMSC compartments are ultimately linked to disease onset and progression and open new therapeutic opportunity to target dissemination of MM tumors and reliably repair bone lesions. (springer.com)
  • metastasis
  • Mechanisms of disease: mechanisms of bone metastasis. (springer.com)
  • Baylor College of Medicine's mission in this program is to develop strategies for stimulating new bone formation while The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is focused on bone loss in patients with cancer and the development of strategies to prevent spread of cancer (bone metastasis) into bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Most tumors that arise in the bones are noncancerous. (livestrong.com)
  • Cancerous bone tumors are relatively uncommon with an estimated 3,260 new cases per year, according to a 2017 American Cancer Society report. (livestrong.com)
  • Cancer that appears in the bone in the form of tumors is considered bone cancer or bone sarcoma. (dmoztools.net)
  • Information about bone cancer and tumors from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. (dmoztools.net)
  • calcification
  • All three of these processes (abnormal mineral metabolism, abnormal bone, and extraskeletal calcification) are closely interrelated and together make a major contribution to the morbidity and mortality of patients with CKD. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • Poliomyelitis affecting the lower extremity in children results in short, thin bones with sometimes severe leg-length discrepancy. (britannica.com)
  • A surface molecule on bacteria that directs bone cells to die has been identified by scientists who claim that this discovery could assist in developing new treatments for severe bone disease. (medindia.net)
  • tumours
  • Localized osteopenia is evident in X-rays of tumours or infections of bone, in osteonecrosis (death of bony tissue), in fracture, and in conditions of diminished mechanical demand. (britannica.com)
  • Amputation may be performed for several reasons including arterial disease , gross injury, tumours, and developmental abnormality, all more common in the legs than in the arms. (britannica.com)
  • Gross injury to nerves, vessels, and soft tissues and primary tumours of bone or other connective tissue usually affect relatively young individuals. (britannica.com)
  • Renal Osteodystrophy
  • CKD-MBD broadens the "old" concept of "renal osteodystrophy", which now should be restricted to describing the bone pathology associated with CKD. (wikipedia.org)
  • The absence of a generally accepted definition and diagnosis of renal osteodystrophy prompted Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO)] to sponsor a controversies conference, entitled Definition, Evaluation, and Classification of Renal Osteodystrophy, in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Inactivity has a profound effect on the bone tissue , probably because the mechanical stimulus to bone formation is decreased. (britannica.com)
  • Like all parts of your body, your bones are living tissue. (livestrong.com)
  • In some cases, surgery is need to remove infected bone tissue. (livestrong.com)
  • With osteonecrosis, loss of blood supply causes death of bone tissue. (livestrong.com)
  • If the bone cells of the transplant survive, they can continue to form bone and can stimulate adjacent tissue to form bone. (britannica.com)
  • Without survival, the transplant may function as a scaffold for invasion by tissue from adjacent bone, guided by the microstructure of the dead transplant. (britannica.com)
  • Report about high dose chemotherapy and the possible development of second malignancy in children and young adults being treated for bone or soft tissue sarcoma. (dmoztools.net)
  • parathyroid hormone
  • Researchers have uncovered the molecular underpinnings of bone loss associated with a condition in which too much parathyroid hormone (PTH) is produced. (nih.gov)
  • skeleton
  • Traction is applied by ropes and pulleys fastened to the skin by adhesive tape or directly to the skeleton with the aid of metal pins drilled into bone . (britannica.com)
  • formation
  • With PDB, bone resorption and subsequent new bone formation occur at an accelerated rate. (livestrong.com)
  • Far less attention has been paid to promoting bone formation with, for example, growth factors or hormones, an approach that would be a valuable adjunct therapy for patients receiving inhibitors of bone resorption. (sciencemag.org)
  • it occurs when bone resorption occurs faster than bone formation. (britannica.com)
  • Insufficient protein, caloric, and vitamin intake interferes with bone formation during growth and remodeling, directly because of an inadequate supply for matrix formation and indirectly because of a deficient production of crucial hormones and enzymes. (britannica.com)
  • Transplantation of bone is aimed at stimulation of bone formation and giving structural support until a defect has been bridged by new bone. (britannica.com)
  • The cells of our bone that is involved in bone formation and bone breakdown is osteoblast and osteoclast respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • The affected bones show signs of dysregulated bone remodeling at the microscopic level, specifically excessive bone breakdown and subsequent disorganized new bone formation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mineral and endocrine functions disrupted in CKD are critically important in the regulation of both initial bone formation during growth (bone modeling) and bone structure and function during adulthood (bone remodeling). (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanisms of bone
  • L. J. Raggatt and N. C. Partridge, "Cellular and molecular mechanisms of bone remodeling," The Journal of Biological Chemistry , vol. 285, no. 33, pp. 25103-25108. (hindawi.com)
  • symptoms
  • Symptoms may include localized bone pain, tenderness, redness and swelling as well as possible fever and chills. (livestrong.com)
  • improve bone health
  • A government-commissioned report on nutrition and bone health, published on Tuesday, recommends several ways for the public, health workers and the government to improve bone health. (bbc.co.uk)
  • marrow
  • Febrile neutropenia can develop in any form of neutropenia, but is most generally recognized as a complication of chemotherapy when it is myelosuppressive (suppresses the bone marrow from producing blood cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Unlike DCs, FDCs are not derived from the bone-marrow hematopoietic stem cell, but are of mesenchymal origin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice models demonstrate that these precursors may be transmitted to recipients with bone marrow allotransplants, in which case both donors' and recipients' FDCs networks may later be found in recipients' lymphoid compartments. (wikipedia.org)
  • reduce
  • These results suggest that many women who are using oral contraceptives in their peak bone-development years could reduce their risk of osteoporosis by approximately three percent to ten percent over one year by making sure they get enough calcium in their diet," Teegarden said. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • human
  • Jim Wilson , MD, a pediatrician and infectious disease expert with AscelBio and a SERMO correspondent, relating some of the breaking news to his peers comments on the expanded Ebola threat, "In this part of Africa , what we've noticed on satellite imagery is there's been a pattern of deforestation and encroachment of human beings on ecosystems that up until now has been fairly isolated. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Human bone char, referred to as "bone charcoal," is mentioned in Thomas Pynchon's novel The Crying of Lot 49. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • You can discover how the nervous system works, the intricate construction of your bones and muscles, and how your body protects itself when you are under threat. (platekompaniet.no)
  • often
  • The practical example of the use of bone char in water purification is demonstrated in Nanofilter invention in Tanzania Historically, bone char was often used in sugar refining as a decolorising and deashing agent, particularly in cane sugar as this contains more colored impurities. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • In 2010, updated guidelines were issued by the Infectious Diseases Society of America, recommending use of cefepime, carbapenems (meropenem and imipenem/cilastatin), or piperacillin/tazobactam for high-risk patients and amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and ciprofloxacin for low-risk patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Bone charcoal is the oldest known water defluoridation agent and was widely used in the United States from the 1940s through to the 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • back
  • Benji presents her with the bone he received from Bill and she follows him back to the Chapman house where Mary brushes her, brings her food and names her Tiffany after the jewelry store. (wikipedia.org)
  • assistant
  • It's estimated that eight out of ten women in the United States use oral contraceptives at some time during the years in which peak bone mass is developing," said Dorothy Teegarden, assistant professor at the University of Purdue's Department of Foods and Nutrition. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • high
  • At the end of the year, women using oral contraceptives and consuming the medium- or high-dairy diet gained significantly more bone mineral density in their hips and spines compared to the low-dairy group. (medica-tradefair.com)
  • Tuberculosis (TB) disease rates in some parts of London are as high as in Sub-Saharan Africa, and drug-resistant strains are becoming increasingly common. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Bone chars usually have lower surface areas than activated carbons, but present high adsorptive capacities for certain metals, particularly those from group 12 (copper, zinc, and cadmium). (wikipedia.org)