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  • Cutaneous
  • Our body can affect or control how much blood flows through our cutaneous vessels (the vessels close to our skin). (antranik.org)
  • diseases
  • Fluctuation in body temperature can be caused by underlying diseases listed above. (medguidance.com)
  • Although some related diseases such as diabetes and multiple sclerosis are linked to changes in body temperature, the chances of having them is very slim. (medguidance.com)
  • organ system for circulating blood in animals The circulatory system, also called the cardiovascular system or the vascular system, is an organ system that permits blood to circulate and transport nutrients (such as amino acids and electrolytes), oxygen, carbon dioxide, hormones, and blood cells to and from the cells in the body to provide nourishment and help in fighting diseases, stabilize temperature and pH, and maintain homeostasis. (wikipedia.org)
  • tend
  • Arrhenius mathematically characterized the effects of temperature on biochemical reactions, pointing out that most biochemical reactions tend to increase logarithmically with increasing temperature to a point of maximization. (intlminingsociety.org)
  • There is a high tendency for the body to respond and fight against any form of harm, and people with anxiety tend to be over-reactive, causing a condition called vasoconstriction. (medguidance.com)
  • As the body tend to produce more heat due to vasoconstriction, sweating is the way to cool the body down. (medguidance.com)
  • Causes
  • During the latter two weeks of their menstrual cycle (during the postovulatory luteal phase), the increase in progesterone causes a 1°F rise in basal body temperature. (antranik.org)
  • Hypertrophic scars occur when the body overproduces collagen, which causes the scar to be raised above the surrounding skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • biological
  • Examples of this profound effect temperature has on biological systems can be seen in its effect on the growth rates of various organisms. (intlminingsociety.org)
  • The balance between the releases of neuropeptides derived from the biological clock and from a metabolic sensory organ as the arcuate nucleus, are essential for an adequate temperature control. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scars result from the biological process of wound repair in the skin, as well as in other organs and tissues of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • indicates
  • The nerves in this area are connected to the very lowest region of the spinal cord, and retaining sensation and function in these parts of the body indicates that the spinal cord is only partially damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • Excessive
  • Excessive sweating involving the whole body is termed generalized hyperhidrosis or secondary hyperhidrosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • adequate
  • The more obvious needs of infants include: adequate feeding, adequate watering, adequate cleaning, adequate shelter, and more specifically, keeping the infant's body temperature within the narrow range of normalcy. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • Yawning is sometimes accompanied, both in humans and animals, by an instinctive act of stretching several parts of the body, including arms, neck, shoulders and back. (wikipedia.org)
  • receives
  • This region is important in cardiovascular, blood pressure, and blood composition regulation, and receives inputs from the subfornical organ (SFO) and the organum vasculosum terminalis (OVLT), which lie outside the blood brain barrier and relay information concerning blood osmolality and levels of endocrine signals such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The body has several types of fat, also known as adipose tissue. (newswise.com)
  • What are skin thermoreceptors (temperature receptors) known as? (brainscape.com)
  • Mutations of genes involved in transcription regulation, chromatin remodelling, α-dystroglycan glycosylation, cytoskeleton and scaffolding protein, RNA splicing, and the MAP kinase signalling pathway are currently known to cause ONH. (wikipedia.org)
  • wrist
  • Rectal temperature, heart rate, and wrist activity were continuously monitored. (arctichealth.org)
  • Testing for GH may involve blood tests (IGF-1 and IGFBP-3), growth hormone stimulation test, or bone age x-ray of the hand or wrist (or body for children younger than 2 years). (wikipedia.org)