Loading...
  • 1977
  • The northern blot technique was developed in 1977 by James Alwine, David Kemp, and George Stark at Stanford University, with contributions from Gerhard Heinrich. (wikipedia.org)
  • In order to avoid confusion, the following abbreviations will be used consistently throughout this article: Since its introduction in 1977, northern blot had been used extensively for RNA quantification despite its shortcomings: (a) time-consuming technique, (b) requires a large quantity of RNA for detection, and (c) quantitatively inaccurate in the low abundance of RNA content. (wikipedia.org)
  • degradation
  • The transfer buffer used for the blotting usually contains formamide because it lowers the annealing temperature of the probe-RNA interaction, thus eliminating the need for high temperatures, which could cause RNA degradation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Detection
  • However, the discovery of reverse transcriptase during the study of viral replication of genetic material led to the development of RT-PCR, which has since displaced northern blot as the method of choice for RNA detection and quantification. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reverse
  • Reverse northern blotting was used in a 2013 study in Gene in which the author identified a number of genes responsible for early cold-resistance response in the cold-hardy citrus fruit Poncirus trifoliata. (wikipedia.org)
  • observe
  • The gels can be stained with ethidium bromide (EtBr) and viewed under UV light to observe the quality and quantity of RNA before blotting. (wikipedia.org)
  • samples
  • To create controls for comparison in a northern blot, samples not displaying the gene product of interest can be used after determination by microarrays or RT-PCR. (wikipedia.org)
  • presence
  • Northern blotting was used to validate the presence of vsiRNAs. (aspergillus.org.uk)
  • C57BL/6 splenocytes were cultured in the presence of the T cell mitogen, ConA (Fig. 4 A). Splenocytes from P14 mice, which express an MHC class I-restricted transgenic TCR, were activated by antigen presentation of the cognate peptide (Fig. 4 B). The blots were probed for ITM2A, CD69, a T cell activation marker 33343536, and EF1α, a housekeeping gene. (nih.gov)