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  • marrow
  • Background Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in people who are thrombocytopenic due to bone marrow failure. (ox.ac.uk)
  • Causes
  • Bernard-Soulier Disease (Giant Platelet Syndrome) Symptoms, Causes, Treatment - What is Bernard-Soulier syndrome? (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2010, the genetic cause of QPD has been determined as a mutation involving an extra copy of the uPA (urokinase plasminogen activator) gene http://bloodjournal.hematologylibrary.org/content/115/6/1264.long.[permanent dead link] The mutation causes overproduction of an enzyme that accelerates blood clot breakdown. (wikipedia.org)
  • alternative
  • All three trials compared a standard trigger (10 x 109/L) versus a higher trigger (20 x 109/L or 30 x 109/L). None of the trials compared a low trigger versus a standard trigger or an alternative platelet trigger. (ox.ac.uk)
  • antagonists
  • Lewis Becker says the teams' next steps are to test various platelet antagonists, or blood-thinning agents, like aspirin, the most common drug treatment in heart and vascular diseases, to find out precisely which hereditary factors may distinguish people who are so-called aspirin-resistant or not, and why the medication works for most but not all. (scienceblog.com)
  • aspirin
  • New studies in mice suggest that blood platelets can destroy deadly malaria parasites, but a single dose of aspirin may be enough to thwart their killing power. (webwire.com)
  • To ensure that their original observation was not due to other genetic changes caused by knocking out the Mpl gene, the researchers eliminated platelets by giving the mice aspirin, which inactivates platelets. (webwire.com)
  • Although there is more work to do, the researchers believe that the aspirin is preventing some sort of anti-malarial effect produced by the platelets. (webwire.com)
  • And when aspirin was added, the platelets no longer held back the parasites. (webwire.com)
  • Platelet samples came from another 2,000 similar participants, including 800 blacks, enrolled in the Genetic Study of Aspirin Responsiveness (GeneSTAR) under way at Johns Hopkins since 2002 and led by Becker's wife and study co-investigator Diane Becker, M.P.H., Sc.D., a professor at the both Hopkins' School of Medicine and the University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. (scienceblog.com)
  • These drugs are frequently administrated in combination with aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) to enhance platelet inhibition especially in patients with ACS or undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). (wikipedia.org)
  • inhibit
  • Specalliy isloated aqueous extracts can inhibit platelet hyperactivity in multiple pathways and thus may reduce the platelet hyperactivty and consequently atherosclerosis and Cardiovascular disease events. (wikipedia.org)
  • organs
  • 3. Perfusion of the lungs with a platelet-preserving solution, compared with that of other organs, gives evidence of the existence of a source of platelet material in the lungs. (rupress.org)
  • 5,000
  • Reporting in the issue of Nature Genetics online June 7, researchers tested the platelet "stickiness" in blood samples from some 5,000 American men and women and compared the results to some 2.5 million single possible changes in the human genetic code to see which genes stood out across the entire group as speeding up or slowing down platelet clumping. (scienceblog.com)
  • Each megakaryocyte can produce anywhere between 5,000 to 10,000 platelets. (healthhype.com)
  • ALOX12
  • In humans, Arachidonate 12-lipoxygenase (12-LO, 12-LOX, ALO12, or platelet type 12-lipoxygenase) is encoded by the ALOX12 gene and expressed primarily in platelets and skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other systematic names for ALOX12 include platelet-type 12-lipoxygenase, arachidonate:oxygen 12-oxidoreductase, Delta12-lipoxygenase, 12Delta-lipoxygenase, C-12 lipoxygenase, leukotriene A4 synthase, and LTA4 synthase. (wikipedia.org)
  • Based predominantly on the presence of its mRNA, human ALOX12 is distributed predominantly in blood platelets and leukocytes and at lower levels in the basal layer of the epidermis (particularly in the skin lesions of psoriasis), islets of Langerhans within the pancreas, and certain cancers. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessels
  • When the inner lining of blood vessels (endothelium) is damaged, platelets are one of the first blood components to respond. (healthhype.com)
  • The endothelium (inner lining) of blood vessels uses nitric oxide to signal the surrounding smooth muscle to relax, thus resulting in vasodilation and increasing blood flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiovascular
  • Platelets are key to fighting infection and sealing wounds and, adversely, can speed up cardiovascular diseases that can lead to potentially fatal heart attacks or strokes. (scienceblog.com)
  • Platelets play an important role in Cardiovascular disease both in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and in the development of acute thrombotic events. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellular Proteins and Their Fatty Acids in Health and Disease Human Placental Trophoblasts: Impact of Maternal Nutrition Early Nutrition and Lifestyle Factors: Effects on First Trimester Placenta Human Blood Platelet Function: Applications in Cardiovascular Health Dutta-Roy, Asim K. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ticlopidine was the first-generation thienopyridine that enhanced platelet inhibition and thus used for treating in actue coronary syndrome and other cardiovascular diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • deficiency
  • Iron deficiency can cause low levels of red blood cells, also known as iron-deficiency anemia. (sfgate.com)
  • The deficiency in copper can cause many hematological manifestations, such as myelodysplasia, anemia, low white blood cell count, and low count of neutrophils(a type of white blood cell that is often called "the first line of defense" for the immune system). (wikipedia.org)
  • Copper deficiency has long been known for as a cause of myelodysplasia (when a blood profile has indicators of possible future leukemia development), but it was not until recently in 2001 that copper deficiency was associated with neurological manifestations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The characteristic hematological (blood) effects of copper deficiency are anemia (which may be microcytic, normocytic or macrocytic) and neutropenia. (wikipedia.org)
  • count
  • The main symptom of low blood platelet count is bleeding, which can present itself in many ways. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Both purpura and petechiae are visible signs of a low blood platelet count. (ehow.co.uk)
  • People also may suffer from low platelet count due to a chronic liver condition. (ehow.co.uk)
  • If your low blood platelet count is due to ITP, you will likely be treated with immunosuppressants, which hinder the immune system from destroying platelets. (ehow.co.uk)
  • If your low platelet count is caused by the treatment for hepatitis C or by chemotherapy, a doctor will likely reduce the amount you are receiving and monitor platelets carefully. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Platelet transfusions also may be an option for all of the causes of low platelet count. (ehow.co.uk)
  • In general, the lower the platelet count, the more likely bleeding is to occur. (petplace.com)
  • An organic diet rich in nutrients can have a beneficial effect on someone's platelet count. (reference.com)
  • The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute shows normal ranges for the most common values detected on a blood test, including red blood cell count, whit. (reference.com)
  • you should for sure ask about itp i also had it when i was younger and low platelet count is the biggest sign look out for any bruising or small red spots if he gets these you need to see your doctor asap. (healthboards.com)
  • The study, now published online in The British Journal of General Practice, revealed that high blood platelet count in some cases may be the only outward indication of cancer. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • TEHRAN (FNA)- Having a high blood platelet count is a strong predictor of cancer and should be urgently investigated to save lives, according to a large-scale study. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Initial blood tests performed in the West Bank revealed a low blood platelet count. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • What are normal white blood count levels? (reference.com)
  • spleen
  • In extreme cases of ITP, a splenectomy may be an option for treatment, as the spleen is responsible for destroying platelets. (ehow.co.uk)
  • Platelets have a lifespan of about 5 to 9 days in the circulation and old platelets are removed from the bloodstream by phagocytes in the spleen and Kupffer cells in the liver. (healthhype.com)
  • When the body needs new platelets to restore normal levels, the spleen is essentially squeezed to release its platelet stores. (healthhype.com)
  • Excessive
  • Excessive bleeding in the gums while brushing your teeth, vomiting blood, nosebleeds and generally having a hard time stopping bleeding are also common signs. (ehow.co.uk)
  • cells
  • The innate immune response is particularly important in fighting malaria, which causes symptoms once the parasite has invaded the victim s red blood cells. (webwire.com)
  • So they conducted similar experiments in a Petri dish in which they added human platelets to red blood cells infected with Plasmodium falciparum, the most deadly human malaria parasite. (webwire.com)
  • Blood platelets are deceptively simple cells. (springer.com)
  • However, as late as 1957 some workers still believed that platelets were products of other cells, such as the erythrocyte (Leiter, 1976). (springer.com)
  • 4. Histological examination of the lungs with a technique adequate to give a differential staining of platelet material demonstrates the presence of giant cells in the lungs, and supports the view that they are active in the production of platelets. (rupress.org)
  • 5. In extrauterine life giant cells are concentrated in the marrow and the lungs, with the maximum of their activity in platelet production in the lungs. (rupress.org)
  • These cells are about 10 times or more large than red blood cells. (healthhype.com)
  • Iron is a mineral that is needed to make two different compounds in your body: myoglobin, which is found in muscle cells, and hemoglobin, which allows red blood cells to transport oxygen. (sfgate.com)
  • Platelets are the smallest of the blood cells. (sfgate.com)
  • Platelets are more like parts of cells than full cells, but they are very important for initiating blood clots. (sfgate.com)
  • The most prominent of these was Holm Holmsen who made basic discoveries establishing platelets as secretory non-nucleated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • One possible side effect is agranulocytosis, a decrease of white blood cells in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Erythrocytapheresis - red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leukapheresis - leukocytes (white blood cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • Serotonin secreted from the enterochromaffin cells eventually finds its way out of tissues into the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • immune
  • Previous studies have shown that platelets are active in the body s innate immune system, which responds rapidly to invading pathogens. (webwire.com)
  • Corticosteroids (cortisone-like drugs) are often used to stop the immune system from destroying platelets. (petplace.com)
  • Less information is available regarding long-term alterations of the immune system" Two apheresis kit recalls were: Baxter Healthcare Corporation (2005), in which "pinhole leaks were observed at the two-omega end of the umbilicus (multilumen tubing), causing a blood leak. (wikipedia.org)
  • body's
  • Similarly, if you bruise easily and always have, it may be due to another harmless condition of your body's blood. (ehow.co.uk)
  • arterial blood
  • With intentional hyperventilation, the CO2 content of arterial blood may be lowered to 10-20 mm Hg (the oxygen content of the blood is little affected), and the respiratory drive is diminished. (wikipedia.org)
  • primarily
  • Biochemically derived from tryptophan, serotonin is primarily found in the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract), blood platelets, and the central nervous system (CNS) of animals, including humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Fox, J. E. B., 19856, Linkage of a membrane skeleton to integral membrane glycoproteins in human platelets. (springer.com)
  • In what is believed to be the largest review of the human genetic code to determine why some people's blood platelets are more likely to clump faster than others, scientists at Johns Hopkins and in Boston have found a septet of overactive genes, which they say likely control that bodily function. (scienceblog.com)
  • circulation
  • It is concluded that new platelets are added to the blood in the capillary areas of the lungs, and that there is a corresponding destruction of platelets as the blood passes through the capillary areas of the systemic circulation. (rupress.org)
  • This leads to high levels of platelets in the circulation. (healthhype.com)
  • A 1999 study published in the journal "Circulation" found that iron was able to interact with platelets and cause them to become activated. (sfgate.com)
  • Apheresis (ἀφαίρεσις (aphairesis, "a taking away")) is a medical technology in which the blood of a person is passed through an apparatus that separates out one particular constituent and returns the remainder to the circulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumor
  • These include all receptors for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGFR) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptors (VEGFR), which play a role in both tumor angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • namely
  • SCBB currently collects cord blood from three public hospitals, namely KK Women's and Children's Hospital, National University Hospital and Singapore General Hospital, as well as all 7 of the private obstetric hospitals in Singapore, Gleneagles Hospital, Mount Alvernia Hospital, Mount Elizabeth Hospital, Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital, Parkway East Hospital (formerly known as East Shore Hospital), Raffles Hospital and Thomson Medical Centre. (wikipedia.org)
  • donors
  • WHO cites that the world is increasingly in need more blood donors to meet these demands. (newsblaze.com)
  • WHO notes that there are 92 million blood donations globally each year, with most of these by voluntary, unpaid donors. (newsblaze.com)
  • Of these voluntary donors, 30 million give blood once, and then do not return. (newsblaze.com)
  • Dr. Dhingra stresses that each blood donation is only 450 millilitres and by having more repeat voluntary donors, it can better assure the reliability of blood supply and safety of blood and blood products. (newsblaze.com)
  • As a public cord blood bank, SCBB does not charge cord blood donors for its services. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • Available techniques for monitoring oxygen therapy include measurement of arterial blood gases on samples obtained by intermittent punctures or by intra-arterial line, noninvasive monitoring by oximetry and transcutaneous techniques, as well as noninvasive monitoring of inspired and expired air. (anosiahuman.com)
  • response
  • Officially opened in September 2005 by Health Minister Mr. Khaw Boon Wan, Singapore Cord Blood Bank was established in response to demands from Haematologists and Paediatricians in Singapore. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been shown that in response to thrombin induced platelet activation, S-SMase is released extracellulary and a parallel decrease in intracellular L-SMase is observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • donation
  • However, as the cord blood is donated altruistically, the donor relinquishes any claims to it after donation. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • With increasing life expectancy and subsequent increase in the number of age-related diseases particularly cancer, the global need for blood donations is on the rise to meet growing demands. (newsblaze.com)
  • cancer
  • According to World Health Organization, some blood products used to treat cancer patients, like platelets, have a shelf-life of only five days. (newsblaze.com)
  • In high- and middle-income countries, with advancements in health-care systems, this need is being driven by increasingly sophisticated medical and surgical procedures, such as cardiovascular and transplant surgery, trauma care and therapy for cancer and blood disorders. (newsblaze.com)
  • patients
  • Having joined the WMDA and NMDP network in 2006 and 2007 respectively, SCBB allows patients of Asian descent all over the world to search SCBB's inventory for a matching cord blood unit as well. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Under certain circumstances the status of tissue oxygenation can be inferred from measurements of mixed venous blood oxygen. (anosiahuman.com)
  • lead
  • This may lead to more blood tests to help eliminate potentially lethal conditions. (womenshealthency.com)
  • Although sclerotherapy generally does not require any recovery time, it is advisable to avoid activities that may lead to dilation of veins and blood stagnation, such as heavy lifting, strenuous exercise or hot baths. (pacificdermcenter.com)
  • tests
  • Blood tests are also performed to assess function of major organs and to assess safety for chemotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy
  • For example, the cost of one arterial blood gas analysis is roughly equal to one or two days of oxygen therapy, and the cost of one day in the hospital is often equal to or greater than the cost of home oxygen therapy of one months duration. (anosiahuman.com)
  • pressure
  • Vital signs assessment included pulse rate and blood pressure. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • To reduce your risk for excessive oral blood loss, avoid taking aspirin after your root canal and apply pressure to the affected area with a piece of sterile gauze at the first sign of bleeding. (cote-scene.com)
  • Filtration occurs in the glomerulus and is largely passive: it is dependent on the intracapillary blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • High
  • The expressed mission of the SCBB is to provide placental cord blood units of high safety and quality, through the practice of internationally accredited techniques of collection, processing, banking and disposition, in order to support cord blood transplantations and related research in Singapore and around the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • units
  • According to the World Health Organization (WHO), more than 80 million units of blood are donated every year, but only 38 percent are collected in developing countries where 82 percent of the global population lives. (newsblaze.com)
  • levels
  • While diabetic-related complications are most common in people whose diabetes is poorly managed, they can also develop in those whose blood sugar levels are well under control. (cote-scene.com)
  • health
  • In an event marking World Blood Donor Day, the UN health agency called for more people to come forward to give blood voluntarily and regularly. (newsblaze.com)
  • world
  • World Blood Donor Day aims to raise awareness of the need for safe blood and to thank those who give blood regularly on a voluntary, unpaid basis. (newsblaze.com)