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  • Donnall Thomas
  • Early research in bone marrow transplantation by E. Donnall Thomas and colleagues demonstrated that this process of splitting TBI into multiple smaller doses resulted in lower toxicity and better outcomes than delivering a single, large dose. (wikipedia.org)
  • endothelial
  • endogenous G-CSF is a glycoprotein produced by monocytes, fibroblasts, and endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), also known as colony-stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), is a monomeric glycoprotein secreted by macrophages, T cells, mast cells, natural killer cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts that functions as a cytokine. (wikipedia.org)
  • macrophages
  • The immunologic mechanism for alloimmunization to antigens present in transfused cells involves presentation of the donor antigens by donor antigen-presenting cells (APCs), ie, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, B cells, to recipient T cells. (medscape.com)
  • Monocytes exit the circulation and migrate into tissue, whereupon they mature into macrophages and dendritic cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancer
  • Cancer patients who undergo stem cell transplantation face two hurdles - lack of white blood cell to fight possible infections and sustaining stem cell function to maintain immunity. (medindia.net)
  • In this Cancer.net video, Sonali M. Smith, MD , director of the lymphoma program , provides an introduction to bone marrow/stem cell transplantation. (uchospitals.edu)
  • born January 18, 1944) is the Enid A. Haupt Chair of Cell Biology at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was the first (1970) to prove the existence of cancer stem cells in a study of leukemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most recently Dr Moore has been studying the cancer stem cell in lung cancer and ovarian cancer and has developed some novel methods for growing human cancer stem cells in vitro allowing extensive molecular analysis and identification of targets for therapy designed to eliminate this rare cell population that is responsible for aggressive tumor growth and relapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow suppression due to anti-cancer chemotherapy is much harder to treat and often involves hospital admission, strict infection control, and aggressive use of intravenous antibiotics at the first sign of infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neutrophil
  • These include, for example, inhibiting neutrophil migration and causing an alteration of the receptors expressed on the cells surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • platelets
  • Bone marrow failure occurs in individuals who produce an insufficient amount of red blood cells, white blood cells or platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone marrow also contains platelets, which trigger clotting, and thus help stop the blood flow when a wound occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • This condition can rapidly lead to life-threatening infection, as the body cannot produce leukocytes in response to invading bacteria and viruses, as well as leading to anaemia due to a lack of red blood cells and spontaneous severe bleeding due to deficiency of platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • haematopoietic cell
  • G-CSF is a colony stimulating factor which has been shown to have minimal direct in vivo or in vitro effects on the production of other haematopoietic cell types. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • the occurrence of acute and chronic graft versus host disease, survival, transplantation-related mortality, and relapse rates were compared. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • In fact, early attempts to decrease treatment related mortality in chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) patients undergoing allogeneic BMT by T-cell depletion of the graft resulted in an unacceptably high rate of relapse suggesting that alloreactivity in the donor graft accounted for a significant portion of the cure rate in this disease. (knowcancer.com)
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and prolymphocytic leukemia, in complete or partial remission, Mantle cell lymphoma, relapsed Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. (knowcancer.com)
  • Chronic fatigue, shortness of breath, and recurrent colds can also be symptoms of bone marrow failure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In immunocompromised patients, B19 infection may persist for months, leading to chronic anemia with B19 viremia due to chronic marrow suppression. (wikipedia.org)
  • proliferation
  • This can be explained in part by their intrinsically low telomerase activity, eradicating the risk of tumorigenesis through unbridled cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • pyruvate kinase def
  • Red cell pyruvate kinase deficiency is a hereditary blood disorder characterized by a deficiency of the enzyme pyruvate kinase. (rarediseases.org)
  • Pyruvate kinase deficiency is an inherited metabolic disorder of the enzyme pyruvate kinase which affects the survival of red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pyruvate kinase deficiency in the red blood cells results in an inadequate amount of or complete lack of the enzyme, blocking the completion of the glycolytic pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis of pyruvate kinase deficiency can be done by full blood counts (differential blood counts) and reticulocyte counts. (wikipedia.org)
  • With these severe cases of pyruvate kinase deficiency in red blood cells, treatment is the only option, there is no cure. (wikipedia.org)
  • PMID
  • Journal of Immunology, 2004 PMID 15494497 Nicotine activates nuclear factor of activated T cells c2 (NFATc2) and prevents cell cycle entry in T cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood, 2004 PMID 15205258 Fratricide of CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes is dependent on cellular activation and perforin-mediated killing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Journal of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, 2004 PMID 15205666 Rapamycin-resistant proliferation of CD8+ T cells correlates with p27kip1 down-regulation and bcl-xL induction, and is prevented by an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer
  • The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune system and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Doctors evaluate the results of various blood tests to confirm that new blood cells are being produced and that the cancer has not returned. (stemcellcordblood.net)
  • A new study using cryoablation to decrease pain for patients who have cancer metastases in the bone is now underway throughout Emory Healthcare . (advancingyourhealth.org)
  • Emory interventional radiologists freeze tumors in order to kill cancer cells in contact with the bone and reduce the size of the tumor. (advancingyourhealth.org)
  • Cancer and blood disorder epidemiology in children and young adults in Russian Federation. (fnkc.ru)
  • Our Center, Dmitry Rogachev National Research Center of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Immunology - is one of the largest institutions in the field of cancer, inborn and acquired blood disorders and immune deficiencies. (fnkc.ru)
  • Wolfson Children's Hospital provides hematology (blood disorders) and oncology (cancer) services in partnership with Nemours Children's Specialty Care, Jacksonville and the University of Florida College of Medicine, Jacksonville. (wolfsonchildrens.com)
  • The fact that certain embryonal carcinoma cells give rise to tumors when injected under the skin or into the body cavity, but behave normally in the blastocyst, has been used to support the idea that cancers can develop not only as a result of gene mutations but also as a result of disturbances in environmental factors controlling normal cell differentiation (epigenetic theory of cancer). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Sorafenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and by blocking blood flow to the cancer. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) is a class of non-Hodgkin lymphoma, which is a type of cancer of the immune system. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the cited gene changes can go awry in plasma cells by, for example, placing a gene that ordinarily controls cell growth adjacent to the normally highly active antibody gene promotor thereby creating a cancer-causing oncogene or, more commonly, by forming extra chromosomes (see trisomy) or chromosomes that have deleted or repetitive sections, any of which such changes may promote malignancy in more complex and less well understood ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is a type of cancer in which the bone marrow makes too many lymphocytes (a type of white blood cell). (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Combining two-photon microscopy with fluorescent tracers, we successfully visualized the engrafted tissues at the single cell level in live mice over several months. (jove.com)
  • Imaging using confocal/two-photon hybrid microscopy enables simultaneous high resolution assessment of uniquely marked cells and their progeny in conjunction with structural components of the tissues. (jove.com)
  • Volumetric analyses over large areas reveal that spectrally coded HSPC-derived cells can be detected non-invasively in various intact tissues, including the bone marrow (BM), for extensive periods of time following transplantation. (jove.com)
  • However, with regard to 42 strains thus far produced , none showed expression in the hematopoietic tissues, except one strain in which LacZ expression was observed in osteoblast cells. (nii.ac.jp)
  • A category of rare and aggressive haematologic tumors co-expressing CD4 and CD56 antigens in the absence of any specific myeloid, B-, T-lymphoid or natural killer (NK) lineage markers is classified as blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms (BPDCN) according to the most recent 2008 WHO classification of tumours of haematopoietic and lymphoid tissues (1). (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Another kind of cell-the pluripotent stem cell of mouse teratocarcinomas-was found to give rise to normal tissues in adult chimeras after injection into the mouse blastocyst. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • All the differentiated tissues in the tumor arise from pluripotent stem cells known as embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • When embryonal carcinoma cells are injected into a genetically marked host blastocyst, they continue to divide and participate in normal development, and give rise to fully differentiated cells in all tissues of the adult, including skin, muscle, nerve, kidney, and blood. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The presence of CD34 on non-hematopoietic cells in various tissues has been linked to progenitor and adult stem cell phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • For years, the concept of harvesting stem cells and re-implanting them into one's own body to regenerate organs and tissues has been embraced and researched in animal models. (wikipedia.org)
  • The diagnosis of CLL is based on the demonstration of an abnormal population of B lymphocytes in the blood, bone marrow, or tissues that display an unusual but characteristic pattern of molecules on the cell surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • sickle cell di
  • In sickle-cell disease, a single glutamic acid in β-globin is replaced with valine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mutations in the gene produce several variants of the proteins which are implicated with genetic disorders such as sickle-cell disease and beta thalassemia, as well as beneficial traits such as genetic resistance to malaria. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common is HbS, which causes sickle cell disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sickle cell disease is closely related to another mutant haemoglobin called haemoglobin C (HbC), because they can be inherited together. (wikipedia.org)
  • Disorders
  • Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for children with bone marrow failure syndromes, immune deficiencies, malignant and inherited disorders. (fnkc.ru)
  • While blood disorders are noncancerous, some can be life threatening, and they all affect a child's quality of life. (wolfsonchildrens.com)
  • Children with blood disorders benefit from our long-time participation in research. (wolfsonchildrens.com)
  • Your child's care team includes pediatric hematologists with deep experience in blood disorders, specialized nurses, researchers and other highly skilled specialists who work together to create a plan for initial treatment and ongoing after care. (wolfsonchildrens.com)
  • Plasma cell dyscrasias (also termed plasma cell disorders and plasma cell proliferative diseases) are a spectrum of progressively more severe monoclonal gammopathies in which a clone or multiple clones of pre-malignant or malignant plasma cells (sometimes in association with lymphoplasmacytoid cells or B lymphocytes) over-produce and secrete into the blood stream a myeloma protein, i.e. an abnormal monoclonal antibody or portion thereof. (wikipedia.org)
  • At one end of this spectrum of hematological disorders, detection of one of these myeloma proteins in an individual's blood or urine indicates the presence of a common and clinically silent disorder termed MGUS, i.e. monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malignancy
  • Experimental chimeras have been used to study a number of biological questions, including the origin and fate of cell lineages during embryonic development, immunological self-tolerance, tumor susceptibility, and the nature of malignancy. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The lack of the normal distribution of these B cells is one basis for demonstrating clonality, the key element for establishing a diagnosis of any B cell malignancy (B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma). (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Embryonal carcinoma cells from several sources, including spontaneous and embryo-derived tumors and cultured lines selected to carry specific mutations or even human chromosomes, have contributed to normal chimeras. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • this disorder is a form of plasma cell dyscrasia in which no myeloma protein is detected in serum or urine (at least as determined by conventional laboratory methods) of individuals who have clear evidence of an increase in clonal bone marrow plasma cells and/or evidence of clonal plasma cell-mediated tissue injury (e.g. plasmacytoma tumors). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the majority of cases the damage results from physical trauma such as car accidents, gunshots, falls, or sports injuries, but it can also result from nontraumatic causes such as infection, insufficient blood flow, and tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • malignant
  • The overproduced Ig's, termed myeloma proteins, commonly circulate in blood, may accumulate in urine, and are the hallmarks of plasma cell dyscrasias including their most malignant forms viz. (wikipedia.org)
  • Malignant infantile osteopetrosis, also known as infantile autosomal recessive osteopetrosis or simply infantile osteopetrosis is a rare osteosclerosing type of skeletal dysplasia that typically presents in infancy and is characterized by a unique radiographic appearance of generalized hyperostosis - excessive growth of bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Failure of remodeling of the distal femoral and proximal humeral metaphyses giving the affected bones a funnel shaped appearance known as (Erlenmeyer flask deformity) Alternating radiolucent femoral metaphyseal bands Pathologic fractures The differential diagnosis of malignant infantile osteopetrosis includes other genetic skeletal dysplasias that cause osteosclerosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neuropathic infantile osteopetrosis Infantile osteopetrosis with renal tubular acidosis Infantile osteopetrosis with immunodeficiency IO with leukocyte adhesion deficiency syndrome (LAD-III) Intermediate osteopetrosis Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (Albers-Schonberg) Pyknodysostosis (osteopetrosis acro-osteolytica) Osteopoikilosis (Buschke-Ollendorff syndrome) Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis Mixed sclerosing bone dysplasia Progressive diaphyseal dysplasia (Camurati-Engelmann disease) SOST-related sclerosing bone dysplasias The only effective line of treatment for malignant infantile osteopetrosis is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Radiographs of at least one case with malignant infantile osteopetrosis have demonstrated bone remodeling and recanalization of medullar canals following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • hematopoiesis
  • The purpose of the present study is to produce model mice in which the hematopoiesis supporting cells are easily distinguished from other stromal cell component. (nii.ac.jp)
  • We have cloned genomic KL gene and 10kb upstream from the transcription initiation site was analyzed by CAT assay using hematopoiesis supporting stromal cell line ST2. (nii.ac.jp)
  • donor
  • Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cells of the donor strain are injected through a fine glass needle, either into the blastocoele cavity or into the center of the inner cell mass (the group of cells from which the fetus is derived). (thefreedictionary.com)
  • malignancies
  • FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion genes have been detected in the eosinophils, neutrophils, mast cells, monocytes, T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes involved in hemtalogical malignancies. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult T-cell l
  • There is some evidence of a relationship with human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) with the adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma subtype. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • When these findings are taken together, combination therapy with MNC transplantation and AM infusion may have additional or synergetic effects on therapeutic angiogenesis for the treatment of severe peripheral vascular disease. (ahajournals.org)
  • In particular, SCID mice and medically immunosuppressed rodents, the common immunologic deficit predisposing these animals to PCP is severe depletion in T-cell function. (binaryinternationalreviews.com)
  • Since more than one type of immune cell is affected, this disease is classified as a severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID). (wikipedia.org)
  • Blood transfusions can also be used to treat severe anemia in DBA. (wikipedia.org)
  • lymphocytes
  • Plasma cells develop from B lymphocytes which are stimulated to undergo this maturational development by T lymphocytes during the latter cells' processing of these antigens. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells include T lymphocytes (T cells), that primarily mediate the immune system, B lymphocytes (B cells) and Natural Killer cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis is typically based on blood tests finding high numbers of mature lymphocytes and smudge cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Normal B lymphocytes consist of a stew of different antibody-producing cells, resulting in a mixture of both kappa- and lambda-expressing cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • These B cells resemble normal lymphocytes under the microscope, although slightly smaller, and are fragile when smeared onto a glass slide, giving rise to many broken cells, which are called "smudge" or "smear" cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic
  • Genetic combinatorial marking using lentiviral vectors encoding fluorescent proteins (FPs) enabled cell fate mapping through advanced microscopy imaging. (jove.com)
  • Blood tests include HLA typing (a test of genetic markers on white blood cells that permit specialized immunology studies). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • undergo
  • In addition, post-meiotic germ cells undergo a dramatic morphological reshaping process as well as a global epigenetic reconfiguration of the germ line chromatin-the histone-to-protamine switch. (jove.com)
  • mice
  • As expected, some transgenic mice bearing 2kb or 6kb constructs showed tissue specific expression of LacZ gene in hair follicles, gut pacemaker cells and neurons where KL is expressed. (nii.ac.jp)
  • 6,7 A recent study has demonstrated that blood flow recovery in ischemic limb and tumor angiogenesis are substantially impaired in heterozygous AM knockout mice. (ahajournals.org)
  • Aggregation chimeras are produced by a technique that involves removing the zonae pellucidae from around 8-16 cell embryos of different strains of mice and pushing the morulae together so that the cells can aggregate. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • It is important to mention that Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells (LT-HSCs) in mice and humans are the hematopoietic cells with the greatest self-renewal capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Racemic valine can be synthesized by bromination of isovaleric acid followed by amination of the α-bromo derivative HO2CCH2CH(CH3)2 + Br2 → HO2CCHBrCH(CH3)2 + HBr HO2CCHBrCH(CH3)2 + 2 NH3 → HO2CCH(NH2)CH(CH3)2 + NH4Br Valine, like other branched-chain amino acids, is associated with insulin resistance: higher levels of valine are observed in the blood of diabetic mice, rats, and humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mice fed a valine deprivation diet for one day have improved insulin sensitivity, and feeding of a valine deprivation diet for one week significantly decreases blood glucose levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dietary valine is essential for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) self-renewal, as demonstrated by experiments in mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skilful experiments led Loutit to form the opinion that, contrary to the prevailing view, the survival of irradiated mice after the implantation of haematropoietic tissue was due to colonization by living cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loutit was the first to recognize 'secondary disease' in irradiated mice restored by the transplantation of foreign cells, and his interpretation of the disease as the consequence of a reaction of the grafted cells against their recipient is now accepted. (wikipedia.org)
  • lymphocyte
  • The basic tests performed when an immunodeficiency is suspected should include a full blood count (including accurate lymphocyte and granulocyte counts) and immunoglobulin levels (the three most important types of antibodies: IgG, IgA and IgM). (wikipedia.org)
  • Most often the lymphocyte count is greater than 5000 cells per microliter (µl) of blood, but can be much higher. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Tests for T cell function: skin tests for delayed-type hypersensitivity, cell responses to mitogens and allogeneic cells, cytokine production by cells Tests for B cell function: antibodies to routine immunisations and commonly acquired infections, quantification of IgG subclasses Tests for phagocyte function: reduction of nitro blue tetrazolium chloride, assays of chemotaxis, bactericidal activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • dendritic cell
  • Artykuł zawiera opis dwóch przypadków chorych z rozpoznaniem bardzo rzadko występujących nowotworów z blastycznych plazmacytoidalnych komórek dendrytycznych ( blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms - BPDCN). (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • In this paper we report two cases of very rare blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms (BPDCN). (czytelniamedyczna.pl)
  • Conversely, under other circumstances CD34 has been shown to act as molecular "Teflon" and block mast cell, eosinophil and dendritic cell precursor adhesion, and to facilitate opening of vascular lumina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Procedure
  • In addition, a safety study showed safety better than surgical alternatives for this cultured cell injection procedure at a 3-year follow-up. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • Development of the new methods of treatment of children with acquired and inherited bone marrow failures. (fnkc.ru)
  • We have one of three federally funded comprehensive hemophilia treatment centers in Florida, as well as a pediatric sickle cell center. (wolfsonchildrens.com)
  • Whilst you are taking VAPRIN Tablets your doctor will want you to have a complete blood test performed, at least once a week, during the first 8 weeks of treatment. (netmeds.com)
  • Elorac, Inc. Announces Orphan Drug Designation for Novel Topical Treatment for Pruritus in Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma (CTCL) website Turgeon, Mary Louise (2005). (wikipedia.org)
  • Autologous matrix-induced chondrogenesis, which is also known as AMIC, is a biological treatment option for articular cartilage damage bone marrow stimulating technique in combination with a collagen membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • germ cells
  • During spermatogenesis in mammals and in Drosophila melanogaster, male germ cells develop in a series of essential developmental processes. (jove.com)
  • They develop spontaneously from germ cells in the gonads of certain mouse strains, or from cells in early embryos transplanted to ectopic sites. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Lymphoma
  • A point-based algorithm for the diagnosis for early forms of cutaneous T cell lymphoma was proposed by The International Society for Cutaneous Lymphomas in 2005. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cutaneous T-cell lymphoma may be divided into the several subtypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 or human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), also called the adult T-cell lymphoma virus type 1, is a retrovirus of the human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV) family that has been implicated in several kinds of diseases including very aggressive adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL), HTLV-I-associated myelopathy, uveitis, Strongyloides stercoralis hyper-infection and some other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult T-cell lymphoma (ATL) was discovered in 1977 in Japan. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • We found that 35bp upstream of TATA-box is sufficient for assigning CAT-gene expression in this cell line. (nii.ac.jp)
  • These phenotypes were unexpectedly linked to mutations in the gene encoding a subunit of the Go-Ichi-Ni-San (GINS) complex, which is essential for DNA replication prior to cell division. (jci.org)
  • Hematopoietic progenitor cell antigen CD34 also known as CD34 antigen is a protein that in humans is encoded by the CD34 gene. (wikipedia.org)
  • As they are stimulated to become plasma cells, B cells refashion parts of their genome in efforts to create a new gene that encodes a functional antibody. (wikipedia.org)
  • If these gene alterations are successful in coding for a functional antibody (termed Ig for immunoglobulin), the maturing B cells and to a greater extent their plasma cell descendants make and secrete an intact antibody, initially IgM but after class switch recombinations, either IgG, IgA, IgE, or IgD. (wikipedia.org)
  • FIP1L1 gene fusions between it and either the platelet-derived growth factor receptor, alpha (PGDFRA) or Retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARA) genes are causes of certain human diseases associated with pathologically increased levels of blood eosinophils and/or Leukemias. (wikipedia.org)
  • function
  • Week 48 or early termination (end of study) - Blood tests (including tests for hepatitis C and D), abdominal ultrasound and a 24-hour urine collection to evaluate kidney function will be done. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Together, the results of this study lay the groundwork for future studies to explore the role of DNA replication in immune cell generation and function. (jci.org)
  • These cells do not function well and crowd out healthy blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • adenosine deaminase
  • Features that support a diagnosis of DBA include the presence of congenital abnormalities, macrocytosis, elevated fetal hemoglobin, and elevated adenosine deaminase levels in red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)