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  • genetic
  • Sickle cell disease (SCD) and its variants are genetic disorders resulting from the presence of a mutated form of hemoglobin, hemoglobin S (HbS) (see the. (edu-essay.com)
  • Sickle cell anemia is an autosomal recessive disorder and the most common genetic disease affecting African-Americans. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • This study is designed to determine the prevalence and prognosis of secondary pulmonary hypertension in adult patients with sickle cell anemia, and to determine whether genetic polymorphisms in candidate genes contribute to its development or response to treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • disorders
  • Hematologists are zeroing in on the escalating humanitarian crisis in southern Europe by assessing the burden of blood disorders among refugees and identifying strategies to facilitate more timely identification and treatment of refugees with sickle cell disease. (news-medical.net)
  • Researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center and the University of Massachusetts Medical School have developed a strategy to treat two of the most common inherited blood diseases -- sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia -- applying CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing to patients' own blood stem cells. (news-medical.net)
  • Create healthcare diagrams like this example called Red Blood Cell Disorders in minutes with SmartDraw. (smartdraw.com)
  • Certain disorders, however, cause a significant variation in cell size. (wikipedia.org)
  • sickle cell di
  • In a breakthrough study of sickle cell disease, biomedical engineers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have revealed that the building blocks of the disease are much less efficient at organizing than previously thought. (news-medical.net)
  • irregularly
  • However, there are some exceptions concerning shape in the artiodactyl order (even-toed ungulates including cattle, deer, and their relatives), which displays a wide variety of bizarre red blood cell morphologies: small and highly ovaloid cells in llamas and camels (family Camelidae), tiny spherical cells in mouse deer (family Tragulidae), and cells which assume fusiform, lanceolate, crescentic, and irregularly polygonal and other angular forms in red deer and wapiti (family Cervidae). (wikipedia.org)
  • erythrocytes
  • Pulmonary Circulation- is the flow of blood from your heart to your lungs and back to the heart Red blood cells or erythrocytes, primarily carry oxygen and collect carbon dioxide through the use of haemoglobin, and have a lifetime of about 120 days. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cytoplasm of erythrocytes is rich in hemoglobin, an iron-containing biomolecule that can bind oxygen and is responsible for the red color of the cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • A 5,300-year-old blood cell found in the tissue of Ötzi the Iceman. (yahoo.com)
  • If the tissue turns out to contain red blood cells, the breakthrough could open a new door on the physiology of dinosaurs. (wsj.com)
  • Together, these three kinds of blood cells add up to a total 45% of the blood tissue by volume, with the remaining 55% of the volume composed of plasma, the liquid component of blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial Cells, Blood Substitutes, and Biotechnology is an academic journal that publishes review articles on the development of artificial cells, tissue engineering, artificial organs, blood substittues, cell therapy, gene and drug delivery systems, bioencapsulation nanosensors, nanodevices and other areas of biotechnology. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessels
  • This distinctive biconcave shape optimises the flow properties of blood in the large vessels, such as maximization of laminar flow and minimization of platelet scatter, which suppresses their atherogenic activity in those large vessels. (wikipedia.org)
  • indices
  • Red blood cell indices are blood tests that provide information about the hemoglobin content and size of red blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • M C H C = H b H c t {\displaystyle MCHC={\frac {Hb}{Hct}}} Normal range: 32-36 g/dL MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia: RBC indices ‹ The template below (Myeloid blood tests) is being considered for merging. (wikipedia.org)
  • Retrieved on 5 April 2009 Encyclopedia of Surgery: A Guide for Patients and Caregivers Red blood cell indices Retrieved on 5 April 2009 7. (wikipedia.org)
  • hematocrit
  • The volume percentage of red blood cells in the blood (hematocrit) is measured by centrifuge or flow cytometry and is 45% of cells to total volume in males and 45% in females. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mean corpuscular volume (MCV) is the average volume of a red blood cell and is calculated by dividing the hematocrit (Hct) by the red blood cell count. (wikipedia.org)
  • M C H = H b R B C {\displaystyle MCH={\frac {Hb}{RBC}}} Normal range: 27-31 pg/cell Mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC) is the average concentration of hemoglobin per unit volume of red blood cells and is calculated by dividing the hemoglobin by the hematocrit. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Red blood cells carry a protein called hemoglobin which has a molecular structure adapted to transport oxygen to body tissues. (nisenet.org)
  • Haemoglobin (the main component of red blood cells) is an iron-containing protein that facilitates transportation of oxygen from the lungs to tissues and carbon dioxide from tissues to the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having oxygen-carrying proteins inside specialized cells (as opposed to oxygen carriers being dissolved in body fluid) was an important step in the evolution of vertebrates as it allows for less viscous blood, higher concentrations of oxygen, and better diffusion of oxygen from the blood to the tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • red blood cell width is on average about 25% larger than capillary diameter, and it has been hypothesized that this improves the oxygen transfer from red blood cells to tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • The cells develop in the bone marrow and circulate for about 100-120 days in the body before their components are recycled by macrophages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anemia of chronic disease, hereditary spherocytosis, acute blood loss, aplastic anemia (anemia resulting from an inability of the bone marrow to produce red blood cells), and certain hereditary hemoglobinopathies (including some cases of thalassemia minor) may all present with a normal RDW. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myeloid
  • http://rdwbloodtest.com Red Blood Cell Distribution Width ‹ The template below (Myeloid blood tests) is being considered for merging. (wikipedia.org)
  • title= (help) ‹ The template below (Myeloid blood tests) is being considered for merging. (wikipedia.org)
  • diseases
  • An EU-funded project has developed a blood-cell analysis device that helps doctors and scientists better understand the causes and mechanics of rare forms of anemia - potentially speeding up the development of new treatments adjusted to the needs of patients with these diseases. (news-medical.net)
  • hemoglobin
  • The color of red blood cells is due to the heme group of hemoglobin. (wikipedia.org)
  • M C V = H c t R B C {\displaystyle MCV={\frac {Hct}{RBC}}} Normal range: 80-100 fL Mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH) is the average amount of hemoglobin (Hb) per red blood cell and is calculated by dividing the hemoglobin by the red blood cell count. (wikipedia.org)
  • leukocytes
  • The number of leukocytes in the blood is often an indicator of disease, and thus the WBC count is an important subset of the complete blood count. (wikipedia.org)
  • Paramecium) as well as in vertebrates (see interactions of leukocytes with corpse of dead cells). (wikipedia.org)
  • antigens
  • The blood groups represent antigens on the surface of the red blood cells which might react with antibodies in the recipient. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two important antigens in the system: A and B. Red cells without A or B are called type O, and red cells with both are called AB. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Rh blood group system consists of nearly around 50 different antigens, but the one of the greatest clinical interest is the "D" antigen, though it has other names and is commonly just called "negative" or "positive. (wikipedia.org)
  • These are not truly universal, as other red cell antigens can further complicate transfusions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Subsequently, PBMCs are challenged with tumor antigens such as tumor stem cell antigen. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon dioxide
  • most waste carbon dioxide, however, is transported back to the pulmonary capillaries of the lungs as bicarbonate (HCO3−) dissolved in the blood plasma. (wikipedia.org)
  • anemia
  • This kind of anemia leads to macrocytes (abnormally large red cells) and the condition called macrocytosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Deficiencies of Vitamin B12 or folate produce a macrocytic anemia (large cell anemia) in which the RDW is elevated in roughly two-thirds of all cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, a varied size distribution of red blood cells is a hallmark of iron deficiency anemia, and as such shows an increased RDW in virtually all cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron Deficiency Anemia: usually presents with high RDW with low MCV Folate and vitamin B12 deficiency anemia: usually presents with high RDW and high MCV Mixed Deficiency (Iron + B12 or folate) anemia: usually presents with high RDW and variable MCV Recent Hemorrhage: typical presentation is high RDW with normal MCV A false high RDW reading can occur if EDTA anticoagulated blood is used instead of citrated blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • The cause of this cellular gigantism is an impairment in DNA replication that delays nuclear maturation and cell division. (wikipedia.org)
  • synthesis
  • Because RNA and cytoplasmic elements are synthesized at a constant rate despite the cells' impaired DNA synthesis, the cells show nuclear-cytoplasmic asynchrony. (wikipedia.org)
  • normally
  • In the case of both iron and B12 deficiencies, there will normally be a mix of both large cells and small cells, causing the RDW to be elevated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Type
  • a 'differential cell count' estimates the numbers of each type. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Except in unusual cases like infants or seriously immunocompromised individuals, all people will have antibodies to any ABO blood type that isn't present on their own red blood cells, and will have an immediate hemolytic reaction to a unit that is not compatible with their ABO type. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulmonary
  • A KAIST research team succeeded in visualizing pulmonary microcirculation and circulating cells in vivo with a custom-built 3D intravital lung microscopic imaging system. (news-medical.net)