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  • microenvironment
  • Research continues in order to identify more effective strategies to mobilize cells out of the microenvironment of the marrow and into the circulation. (nih.gov)
  • precursors
  • However, counting CD34+ mononuclear cells may overestimate myeloid blasts in bone marrow smears due to hematogones (B lymphocyte precursors) and CD34+ megakaryocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is a great potential for stem cell therapy, using a variety of cell precursors (particularly hematopoietic,)to contribute to new blood vessel formation (and possibly limited heart muscle formation) and muscle preservation in the myocardial infarct zone. (bioportfolio.com)
  • Parvovirus B19 inhibits erythropoiesis by lytically infecting RBC precursors in the bone marrow and is associated with a number of different diseases ranging from benign to severe. (wikipedia.org)
  • high-dose
  • On March 15, 2016 it was approved by the U.S. FDA under the trade name Evomela for: use as a high-dose conditioning treatment prior to hematopoietic progenitor (stem) cell transplantation in multiple myeloma (MM) patients the palliative treatment of MM patients for whom oral therapy is not appropriate Melphalan is currently being used to treat ocular retinoblastoma, a pediatric solid tumor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regenerative Medicine
  • In 2006 Eaves retired as required by provincial law at that time, becoming Professor Emeritus of Hematology and spending more time on several companies he founded to further the fields of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine - STEMCELL Technologies, STEMSOFT Software Inc. and Malachite Management Inc. These companies continue to grow under his leadership and by 2016, STEMCELL had over 900 employees making Canada's largest biotechnology company. (wikipedia.org)
  • platelets
  • administering the collected bone marrow cells or peripheral blood stem cells to a recipient patient, whereby platelets or erythrocytes in the recipient patient are increased. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • The cell ceases its growth at 4N, 8N or 16N, becomes granular, and begins to produce platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • After budding off platelets, what remains is mainly the cell nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Megakaryocytes are directly responsible for producing platelets, which are needed for the formation of a thrombus, or blood clot. (wikipedia.org)
  • This condition can rapidly lead to life-threatening infection, as the body cannot produce leukocytes in response to invading bacteria and viruses, as well as leading to anaemia due to a lack of red blood cells and spontaneous severe bleeding due to deficiency of platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Because of the failure of hematologic components to develop-white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets-the body's capabilities to fight infection, deliver oxygen, and form clots are all diminished. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CFU-GEMM cell is capable of differentiating into white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets, all of which are normally found in circulating blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leukemia
  • Allen C. Eaves (born 1941) was the founding Director of the Terry Fox Laboratory for Hematology/Oncology Research, which over a 25 year period (1981-2006) he grew into an internationally recognized[citation needed] centre for the study of leukemia and stem cell research. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among those affected, the majority develops cancer, most often acute myelogenous leukemia, and 90% develop bone marrow failure (the inability to produce blood cells) by age 40. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] As FA is now known to affect DNA repair, specifically nonhomologous end joining, and given the current knowledge about dynamic cell division in the bone marrow, finding patients are more likely to develop bone marrow failure, myelodysplastic syndromes, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is not surprising. (wikipedia.org)
  • bloodstream
  • Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF or GCSF), also known as colony-stimulating factor 3 (CSF 3), is a glycoprotein that stimulates the bone marrow to produce granulocytes and stem cells and release them into the bloodstream. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1997
  • In recognition of his research accomplishments and leadership in moving basic science discoveries in stem cell biology into the clinic, he was elected President of the International Society of Cellular Therapy (1995-1997), Treasurer of the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (1995-2002) and President of the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation (1999-2000). (wikipedia.org)
  • somatic
  • Hela cells and human fibroblast-derived iPS cells showed high telomerase activity while Muse was at nearly the same level as that in somatic cells such as fibroblasts (these data are shown without running control for the telomerase activity, the comparison is not scientific thought). (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, genes related to cell cycle progression and tumorigenicity in Muse cells were at the same level as those in somatic cells, while the same genes were very high in ES and iPS cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapy
  • Bone marrow transplantation is the only curative therapy for PNH, but is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • The results of this study indicate that early administration of eculizumab may be a safe and effective therapy for hemolytic episodes associated with allogeneic peripheral stem cell transplantation in patients with PNH. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • Their atomic investigation of mutant KIT receptor which emphasized on the EAL region provided a better insight into the understanding of the sunitinib resistance mechanism of the KIT receptor and could help to discover new therapeutics for KIT-based resistant tumor cells in GIST therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy originated in the nineteenth century when scientists experimented by injecting animal material in an attempt to prevent and treat illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Today two distinct categories of cell therapy are recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first category is cell therapy in mainstream medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell therapy can be defined as therapy in which cellular material is injected into a patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • The origins of cell therapy can perhaps be traced to the nineteenth century, when Charles-Édouard Brown-Séquard (1817-1894) injected animal testicle extracts in an attempt to stop the effects of aging. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1931 Paul Niehans (1882-1971) - who has been called the inventor of cell therapy - attempted to cure a patient by injecting material from calf embryos. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent times, cell therapy using human material has been recognized as an important field in the treatment of human disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The experimental field of Stem cell therapy has shown promise for new types of treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In mainstream medicine, cell therapy is supported by a distinct healthcare industry which sees strong prospects for future growth. (wikipedia.org)