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  • Abrasion
  • The most common source of abrasion is traumatic toothbrushing, meaning that you are using a toothbrush that's too hard or applying too much force when you brush. (moffettdental.com)
  • Abrasion can also result from a diet loaded with abrasive foods like sun flower seeds and nuts or habits such as nail-biting and pen-chewing. (moffettdental.com)
  • JAWS
  • We conclude that crocodilian ISOs have diverse functions, including detection of water movements, indicating when to bite based on direct contact of pursued prey, and fine tactile discrimination of items held in the jaws. (biologists.org)
  • Shark jaws contain multiple rows of sharp, serrated, triangular teeth , and are continuously replaced as they shed. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • They were previously thought to have short, broad jaws and powerful bite forces, but recent reconstruction indicate that the dentary symphesis is elongated and connects at an approximately 15º angle, giving the jaw a long "V" shape. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, they lacked the gripping dentition needed to grab prey and the narrow jaw and anterior tooth placement do not match the short, massive skulls and jaws other species with the strong bite force required to break shells. (wikipedia.org)
  • morphology
  • Two studies were done to address the interaction between tooth root morphology, diet and bite force in small mammals. (washington.edu)
  • In general though, these studies combined show that microCT successfully allows the non-destructive quantification of previously difficult-to-access tooth morphology and shows the potential for tooth roots to provide valuable dietary, behavioral and ecological information in small mammals. (washington.edu)
  • Speculation as to dinosaur predation has ranged from inferences based on skeletal morphology, ichnofossils such as bite marks, coprolites, stomach contents, and trackways and, by more rarely, direct predator-prey skeletal associations ( 3 , 4 , 18 ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ ⇓ - 23 ). (pnas.org)
  • 100,000
  • The number of human bites occurring annually is estimated at greater than 60 bites per 100,000 persons (1). (amazonaws.com)
  • We choose to collaborate with BrilliantSmile because it's a company with almost 10 years in the industry with a customer register of over 100,000 people who bleached their teeth with just their market-leading products and methods. (bostonbritesmile.com)
  • Stress
  • If you have a clenching or grinding habit, we can make a mouthguard for you that will protect your teeth during sleep or periods of high stress. (moffettdental.com)
  • Abfraction lesions will generally occur in the region on the tooth where the greatest tensile stress is located. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to note that studies supporting this configuration of abfraction lesions also state that when there is more than one abnormally large tensile stress on a tooth two or more abfraction lesions can result on the one surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • If teeth come together in a non-ideal bite the researchers state that this would create further stress in areas on the teeth. (wikipedia.org)
  • This method is further limited in that it cannot shed light on stress-strain distributions, and is therefore ill suited to evaluating the ability of anatomical structures to sustain predicted forces. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • dentition
  • Tyrannosaurid dentition is markedly heterodont, perhaps indicating a partition of different sectors of the jaw for different function: scraping for the incisiform premaxillary teeth versus tearing and crushing for the lateral teeth, for example. (tolweb.org)
  • canine
  • Several days after an atraumatic laryngoscopy, a 65-yr-old male (ASA physical status IV) discovered that his maxillary right canine tooth (#6) was broken in the root, just below the gingival margin. (lww.com)
  • roots
  • The relationship between tooth roots and diet is relatively unexplored, although a logical relationship between harder diets and increased root surface area is suggested. (washington.edu)
  • If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant supported Denture can replace the missing teeth and some of the tooth roots. (slideshare.net)
  • researchers
  • Marks from the serrated teeth may help identify the culprit, the researchers said. (csmonitor.com)
  • Even more impressive, the dinosaur's tooth pressure - a new metric devised by the researchers - was even greater: an astounding 30 tonnes per square centimetre (431,000 pounds per square inch) of dental surface. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • crush
  • W olves and hyenas, for example, are also able to crush bones with their teeth, accessing nutritious marrow. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • Do it correctly and it will almost always break his jaw, crush his larynx, shatter his teeth, force him to bite off his tongue, etc. (listverse.com)
  • periodontal
  • The temporary material is shaped by the dentist to form a tooth shape that protects the prepared tooth, prevents damage to the periodontal tissues (gums) and disguises the prepared tooth to a degree until the final, definitive restoration can be made by a dental technician. (whatclinic.com)
  • root
  • In contrast, no strong relationship was found between estimated bite force and tooth root surface area in rodents. (washington.edu)
  • Omphalosaurus (from the Greek root "Button Lizard", for their button-like teeth) is an extinct genus of marine reptile from the Middle Triassic , thought to be in the order of Ichthyosauria . (wikipedia.org)
  • There are 2 parts to a dental implant which stimulate the strong holding ability of the real tooth root. (slideshare.net)
  • cracks
  • The picture emerges of teeth as damage-tolerant structures, full of internal weaknesses and defects and yet able to contain the expansion of seemingly precarious cracks and fissures within the enamel shell. (nih.gov)
  • bones
  • Sixty-six million years ago, a tyrannosaur may have sunk its sharp and serrated teeth into the bones of another tyrannosaur, new research suggests. (csmonitor.com)
  • The difference is that T. Rex - even if it lacked occluding teeth - still have the necessary equipment to make short work of bones. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • terrestrial
  • Although other theropods rivaled or exceeded Tyrannosaurus rex in size , it is still among the largest known land predators and is estimated to have exerted the largest bite force among all terrestrial animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • dentures
  • Some dental appliances such as partial dentures or retainers that are frequently taken in and out of the mouth can also abrade teeth. (moffettdental.com)
  • Many Patients choose implants to replace a single tooth,several teethortosupporta full setof dentures. (slideshare.net)
  • As leading dental implants providers, they have helped numerous patients missing one, several or even all of their teeth achieve a beautiful smile without traditional dentures or bridges. (dentalimplantsusa.com)
  • partially
  • The two traumatically fused hadrosaur vertebrae partially enclosing a T. rex tooth were discovered in the Hell Creek Formation of South Dakota. (pnas.org)
  • weak
  • Here, to our knowledge, in the most comprehensive three-dimensional finite element analysis performed to date for any taxon, we ask whether the traditional view that the bite of H. sapiens is weak and the skull too gracile to sustain high bite forces is supported. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The argument that the bite of H. sapiens is relatively weak is based primarily on two-dimensional lever mechanics, wherein muscle forces are reduced to single vectors for each major muscle group. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Here, using three-dimensional finite element analysis (FEA), we test the hypothesis that the human bite is weak and the skull unable to sustain high bite forces compared with that of other hominoids. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • shift
  • Without occlusion, it is typical for food items to rotate and shift as teeth are being engaged,' making it difficult to get a firm grasp, said Gignac. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • As the bite changes to compensate for the lost tooth, there is a risk of extra pressure and discomfort on the jaw joints, which may lead to Tempromandular Disorder also knownas (TMD)  If a missing tooth is not replaced the surrounding teeth can shift in their positions. (slideshare.net)
  • Abfraction
  • Teeth that come together too soon or come under more load than they are designed for could lead to abfraction lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • surface
  • The teeth are button-like, with a dome shape when viewed laterally and almost circular crowns that have an irregular enamel surface akin to the texture of an orange peel . (wikipedia.org)
  • The upper tooth plates form a convex surface, while the lower plate is concave. (wikipedia.org)
  • brush
  • It is also important that you are careful with your oral hygiene and brush your teeth morning and night, use white toothpaste and rinse with fluorine solution like Dentan. (bostonbritesmile.com)
  • predators
  • Gignac and Gregory Erickson from Florida State University built on earlier attempts to measure T. Rex's bite force by adding comparisons with predators roaming the wild today. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • procedure
  • Watch Dr. Nejat on Channel 9 News as he demonstrates and explains the advantages of Teeth-in-an-Hour™ - an innovative procedure that replaces your missing teeth in just one visit. (dentalimplantsusa.com)
  • human
  • Diminished bite force has been considered a defining feature of modern Homo sapiens , an interpretation inferred from the application of two-dimensional lever mechanics and the relative gracility of the human masticatory musculature and skull. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • injuries
  • The last two types of attacks, though less common than the hit-and-run attack, are the source of most severe shark bite injuries and shark bite deaths. (emedicinehealth.com)
  • Therefore
  • Therefore, simplified single-rooted tooth geometry was used to make predictions about PDL fiber bundle organization under two types of habitual loading. (washington.edu)