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  • Skeletal
  • somatic n's the sensory and motor nerves supplying skeletal muscle and somatic tissues. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • The electromyographic (EMG) signal measures the electrical currents that are generated in skeletal muscle during its contraction and represents the neuromuscular activities [ 1 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • In this study, the EMG signal amplitude was recorded and analysed from the dominant biceps brachii (BB) muscle because this is one of the active skeletal muscles in the upper extremity and because EMG signals are repeatedly generated by this muscle during contraction due to the elbow flexion-relaxation phenomenon [ 6 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • As a result, the random raw and integrated EMG signals from the contracted BB muscle need to be recorded for further analysis, which may help researchers clarify the functional and clinical significance of the skeletal muscle architecture, develop robotic prosthesis, control exoskeleton robots, design an orthosis system for neuromotor rehabilitation and select the exact subject during experimentation [ 10 , 11 ]. (alliedacademies.org)
  • Downham DY, Wilson BC, Lexell J, Sjöström M (1987) Distribution of different fibre types in human skeletal muscle: a method for the detection of neurogenic muscle disorders. (springer.com)
  • Lexell J, Downham D, Sjöström M (1983) Distribution of different fibre types in human skeletal muscle. (springer.com)
  • A statistical and computational model for the study of fibre-type grouping and early diagnosis of skeletal muscle fibre denervation and reinnervation. (springer.com)
  • skeletal muscle Grant sponsors: Department of Odontology (Medical Faculty of Umeå University), Västerbotten County Council, Swedish Dental Society. (docme.ru)
  • The obese Zucker rat (OZR) is a model of metabolic syndrome, which has lower skeletal muscle size than the lean Zucker rat (LZR). (physiology.org)
  • Because satellite cells are essential for postnatal muscle growth, this study was designed to determine whether reduced satellite cell proliferation contributes to reduced skeletal mass in OZR vs. LZR. (physiology.org)
  • Skeletal muscles are considerably smaller in the OZR than in control lean Zucker rats (LZR) of similar ages. (physiology.org)
  • This is important because skeletal muscle is the primary site of glucose and fat oxidation, both of which are in excess with metabolic syndrome ( 6 , 27 ). (physiology.org)
  • Therefore, a reduction of skeletal muscle mass would further compromise clinical outcomes in metabolic syndrome. (physiology.org)
  • The lower skeletal muscle mass in the OZR appears to be partly accounted for by an altered balance between protein synthesis and degradation in this model of metabolic syndrome ( 4 , 16 ). (physiology.org)
  • Furthermore, postnatal muscle growth and hypertrophy of skeletal muscle critically depend on the proliferation and differentiation of muscle satellite cells ( 1 , 25 ). (physiology.org)
  • It is possible that a decrease in satellite cell proliferation could contribute to the decrease in nucleic acid content and skeletal muscle mass observed in the OZR. (physiology.org)
  • The effect of somatosensory stimulation on the blood flow in the skeletal muscle. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) produced skeletal muscle vasodilation by antidromic stimulation of dorsal root afferents in rats'Nauroscience letters. (nii.ac.jp)
  • ulnar nerve
  • Partial Ulnar nerve grafted to Long Triceps. (ubpn.org)
  • Claw hand is seen in ulnar nerve injury such as Klumpke's paralysis and manifests as a weakness/inability to flex the wrist (flexor carpi ulnaris), the metacarpophalagneal joints of the 4th and 5th digits in extension (interosseous muscles), and interphalagneal joints of the 4th and 5th digits in flexion (also interossei and lumbricals). (varsitytutors.com)
  • the ulnar nerve was most often injured, either singly or in combination. (scribd.com)
  • peripheral nerve injuries
  • Surface electromyographic (sEMG) biofeedback has been widely used in the rehabilitation of stroke, however, has not been described for the rehabilitation of peripheral nerve injuries. (frontiersin.org)
  • Guiding Regeneration Gel (GRG) was developed in response to the clinical need of improving treatment for peripheral nerve injuries and helping patients regenerate massive regional losses in peripheral nerves. (hindawi.com)
  • Many severe peripheral nerve injuries can only be treated through surgical reconstructive procedures. (hindawi.com)
  • Peripheral nerve injuries represent a major cause for morbidity and disability and pose substantial costs for society from a global perspective. (hindawi.com)
  • The patients with peripheral nerve injuries acquire lifelong disability and require posttrauma peripheral nerve rehabilitation treatments following a growing number of traffic and work accidents, natural disasters, and military activity that cause disability associated with loss of sensory and motor functions and, in some cases, intractable pain. (hindawi.com)
  • Therefore, the repair and regeneration of peripheral nerve injuries with massive loss defect is a major clinical issue for the relatively new fields of regenerative medicine, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. (hindawi.com)
  • Brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries lead to significant upper extremity dysfunction and disability. (frontiersin.org)
  • Due to improved functional outcomes, decreased morbidity, and surgical time, we are now experiencing a paradigm shift in the treatment of brachial plexus and peripheral nerve injuries from nerve grafting to nerve transfers ( 1 , 2 ). (frontiersin.org)
  • Indications are evolving and currently include patients with proximal nerve root avulsions, high level peripheral nerve injuries, large neuromas-in-continuity, and/or multi-level nerve injuries. (frontiersin.org)
  • extensor hallucis longu
  • The tibialis anterior or extensor hallucis longus muscles (ie, innervated by the deep peroneal) and the peroneus longus or brevis muscles (ie, innervated by the superficial peroneal) are useful to study for this purpose. (medscape.com)
  • The deep peroneal nerve runs downward below the layers of the peroneus longus, extensor digitorum longus, and extensor hallucis longus muscles to the front of the leg (Figure 2). (nysora.com)
  • Insertion
  • Scan proximally towards the apex of the popliteal triangle and follow the course of the nerve before needle insertion. (usra.ca)
  • Figure 1: Needle insertion for saphenous nerve block of the ankle. (nysora.com)
  • branches
  • Natural color photograph of dissection of the right cubital region, anterior view, showing the major nerves, their branches and associated musculature. (nih.gov)
  • Scan the region proximally and distally to assess nerve anatomy and the point at which the sciatic nerve branches into its tibial and peroneal components. (usra.ca)
  • Mark the point at which the sciatic nerve branches into its tibial and peroneal components. (usra.ca)
  • It can be helpful in determining which nerve is involved primarily-the common peroneal nerve at the knee or one of its two branches, the superficial or deep peroneal nerve. (medscape.com)
  • The genitofemoral nerve or its branches (genital or femoral) can be entrapped throughout its course. (medscape.com)
  • Just below the head of the fibula, the common peroneal nerve divides into its terminal branches: the deep peroneal and superficial peroneal nerves. (nysora.com)
  • It also branches to the skin, subcutaneous tissue, muscles, and bones of the sole. (nysora.com)
  • Since the nerve is so long, it contains many significant branches. (healthline.com)
  • vastus lateralis
  • In this study, cross-sections were prepared of whole autopsied vastus lateralis muscle from 24 previously physically healthy men, aged 15 to 83 years. (springer.com)
  • Total number, size and proportion of different fiber types studied in whole vastus lateralis muscle from 15-to 83-year-old men. (springer.com)
  • Atrophy of the quadriceps muscles (biceps femoris, vastus lateralis) may be seen within 1 to 2 weeks of the injury. (vetstream.com)
  • anatomy
  • Scan the region proximally and distally to assess nerve anatomy. (usra.ca)
  • Over the past 20 years our understanding of nerve anatomy, topography, and regeneration has improved and the surgical technique of nerve transfers has been developed. (frontiersin.org)
  • sensory
  • Sensory nerves, sometimes called afferent nerves, carry information from the outside world, such as sensations of heat, cold, and pain, to the brain and spinal cord. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • afferent nerve any nerve that transmits impulses from the periphery toward the central nervous system, such as a sensory nerve. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • sensory nerve a peripheral nerve that conducts impulses from a sense organ to the spinal cord or brain. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • As motor and sensory control systems of muscles are interlinked, also the intrafusal fiber population, that is, muscle spindles, should undergo age-related changes in fiber type appearance. (docme.ru)
  • Muscle spindles play multifunctional roles contributing in proprioception, postural and movement control, motor learning and in plasticity of motor behaviors (Windhorst, 2007, 2008), in predicting future kinematic states by acting as forward sensory model (Dimitriou and Edin, 2010), and as suggested, in the genesis and spread of chronic muscle pain (Johansson et al. (docme.ru)
  • The results advance our knowledge on the role of sensory input in the generation of the neural drive to muscles and provide the basis for designing physiologically inspired methods for prosthesis control. (jneurosci.org)
  • upper extremity
  • The aim of this paper was to present structured rehabilitation protocols in two different patient groups with upper extremity nerve injuries using sEMG biofeedback. (frontiersin.org)
  • sympathetic nerves
  • accelerator n's the cardiac sympathetic nerves, which, when stimulated, accelerate the action of the heart. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Following the severance of splanchnic nerves, the increased response of MBF reversed to the decreased response, which was abolished by further severance of lumbar sympathetic nerves. (nii.ac.jp)
  • common peron
  • Patient outcome after common peroneal nerve decompression. (medscape.com)
  • Kollrack YM, Möllenhoff G. [Exertional compartment syndrome of the lower leg and common peroneal nerve palsy as combined injury after weight lifting]. (medscape.com)
  • local anesthetic
  • Nerve visualization is significantly improved once local anesthetic is injected due to enhanced contrast between the hyperechoic nerve and the hypoechoic fluid collection. (usra.ca)
  • This concept is important for success of the block because the two deep nerves are anesthetized by injecting local anesthetic under the fascia, whereas the three superficial nerves are anesthetized by a simple subcutaneous injection of local anesthetic. (nysora.com)
  • popliteal
  • Figure A shows the sciatic nerve (arrowheads) in the popliteal fossa before it divides. (usra.ca)
  • Figure B shows the sciatic nerve has divided into the tibial (TN) and peroneal (PN) components more caudad in the popliteal fossa. (usra.ca)
  • femoral nerve
  • Damage to the femoral nerve can occur from an external blow to the limb or postanesthetic recumbency. (vetstream.com)
  • Bilateral femoral nerve injury has been reported in horses after general anesthesia and from sacroiliac luxation after dystocia in mares. (vetstream.com)
  • peroneal
  • Common peroneal part nerve (L5, S1, S2). (getbodysmart.com)
  • Nerve conductions should show isolated peroneal nerve abnormalities. (medscape.com)
  • Peroneal neuropathy from intraneural ganglia of the peroneal nerve may have various patterns: outer (epifascicular) epineurial, inner (interfascicular) epineurial, and combined outer and inner epineurial. (medscape.com)