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  • 2500 ppm
  • EVALUATION FOR ACCEPTABLE DAILY INTAKE BIOCHEMICAL ASPECTS Absorption, distribution and excretion A male rat was fed a basal diet supplemented with 2500 ppm benomyl for 12 days and then given a single dose of 2C 14 benomyl by gastric intubation. (inchem.org)
  • Very little of the parent compound or methyl 2 benzimidazolecarbamate (MBC) was present in the urine (<5%) (Gardiner et al,, 1974), A male dog was fed a diet containing 2500 ppm benomyl. (inchem.org)
  • crops
  • Evaluates the risks to human health and the environment posed by benomyl, a fungicide registered for use in 50 countries on over 70 crops, including cereals, cotton, soybeans, tobacco, mushrooms, grapes, bananas and other fruits. (who.int)
  • In the agriculture industry, Benomyl killed nearly all of the fungi on crops such as strawberries and wheat, but the few surviving fungi happened to be highly toxic molds - which are now flourishing in our environment. (mercola.com)
  • soil
  • Benomyl can linger in the environment: it binds to soil, doesn't dissolve in water. (naturalpedia.com)
  • Concerning hazards to environmental organisms, the report cites data from laboratory and field studies indicating that benomyl, applied at recommended rates, has little effect on soil microbial activity, but some adverse effects on groups of fungi. (who.int)
  • tissue
  • The metabolism of benomyl was also studied in vitro using various tissue homogenates as well as blood and sheep rumen fluid as enzyme sources. (inchem.org)
  • environmental
  • The compound was reviewed at the present Meeting as a result of the CCPR periodic review programme, with particular attention to the recent WHO Environmental Health Criteria monograph on benomyl (EHC 148). (inchem.org)
  • As per the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), benomyl is registered for post-harvest use on apricots , citrus fruits , cherries , prunes , peaches , and plums. (naturalpedia.com)
  • less
  • No residues in milk (less than 0.01 ppm) were detected 48 hours after benomyl was removed from the diet. (inchem.org)
  • The radioactivity in the blood consisted of 68% 2-C 14 MBC and less than 15% intact benomyl (Sherman et al. (inchem.org)
  • The half-life of benomyl was about 45 min in maternal blood and less in the embryos. (inchem.org)
  • body
  • 1974). Groups of male mice, rabbits and sheep were dosed orally with 0.1 g benomyl/kg body weight. (inchem.org)
  • diet
  • The highest mean value of 5-HBC, after administration of 5000 ppm benomyl in the diet, was 0.44 mg/kg bw in the blood and 0.33 mg/kg bw in the embryos. (inchem.org)
  • mean
  • The level of benomyl 1 h after treatment was 0.98-8.4 mg/kg bw, with a mean of 5.0 mg/kg bw on the first day of treatment. (inchem.org)
  • blood
  • After one hour blood was taken and analysed for benomyl and MBC by thin-layer chromatography and C 14 radioscanning. (inchem.org)
  • area
  • The area where benomyl exposure occurs should have emergency showers and eyewash fountains in case direct contact happens. (naturalpedia.com)
  • data
  • This monograph summarizes new data on benomyl, data that were not reviewed previously, and relevant data from the previous monographs on this pesticide. (inchem.org)
  • case
  • The major route of excretion, in this case, was by way of the faeces where benomyl and/or MBC and 5-HBC were detected (Gardiner et al. (inchem.org)
  • male
  • 1974). 2-C 14 benomyl was administered by gastric intubation to a male rat at a dosage level of 900 mg/kg. (inchem.org)
  • human
  • According to a report by BBC from 2003 , scientists connected benomyl exposure with the disrupted formation of eyes in human fetuses, leading to several babies having microphthalmia (wherein the eyes are smaller than normal) or anophthalmia (wherein the the baby was born with the eyes absent and the eyelids sealed shut). (naturalpedia.com)
  • growth
  • In the 1970s, Benomyl was also added to paints to stop the growth of mold on damp walls, especially in public buildings such as offices and schools. (mercola.com)
  • Similar
  • Since the 1970s, the molds in our environment have become much more aggressive due to the widespread use of a fungicide called Benomyl, 1 , 2 through a process similar to the creation of superbugs by overuse of antibiotics. (mercola.com)