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  • Pathogens
  • Specific bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens were identified as the causative agents of many serious diseases, and a race immediately began to find effective means to attack these implicated microbes. (umn.edu)
  • Regulation of transcription by eukaryotic-like serine-threonine kinases and phosphatases in gram-positive bacterial pathogens. (springer.com)
  • 1928
  • In 1928, the British physician-scientist Sir Alexander Fleming serendipitously discovered that the antibiotic substance he termed "penicillin" was produced by a Penicillium mold growing on agar plates impregnated with staphylococci. (umn.edu)
  • confer
  • Of particular interest is the ability of bacterial signaling systems to confer reversible resistance phenotypes, an act that saves precious cellular energy because they respond to host assaults only when the threat is present. (springer.com)
  • humans
  • So far," he proclaimed, "there's nothing that links use in animals to a buildup of resistance in humans. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Employing a technology called phage-typing, researchers affiliated with Britain's Public Health Laboratory Service (PHLS) warned that resistance selection on farms could also harm humans. (jhu.edu)
  • horizontal gene tra
  • When new research on horizontal gene transfer emerged during the mid-1960s, corporatist power struggles prevented a modification of regulations to account for so-called infectious resistance (resistance proliferation via horizontal gene transfer). (jhu.edu)