• Using both membrane permeant (HBR-3,5DM) and non-permeant (HBRAA-3E) fluorogens that fluoresce upon binding to FAST, we demonstrated that fully functional FAST can be exposed at the cell surface and used to specifically tag the external side of the bacterial envelop in both diderm and monoderm bacteria. (pasteur.fr)
  • As the intrinsically disordered proteins bind with other proteins, they may change their shape, allowing them to then interact with different proteins, potentially creating a chronological sequence of interactions as proteins bind and then are cast off. (phys.org)
  • However, despite the interest to study the localisation of surface proteins such as adhesins, transporters or hydrolases, monitoring their dynamics in live imaging remains challenging, due to the limited availability of fluorescent probes remaining functional after secretion. (pasteur.fr)
  • Our work opens new avenues to study the organization and dynamics of the bacterial cell surface proteins. (pasteur.fr)
  • Pathogenic bacteria frequently express surface proteins with affinity for components of the mammalian extracellular matrix, i.e. collagens, laminin, fibronectin or proteoglycans. (nih.gov)
  • They are extracted from the envelope proteins of bacteria which are cultivated by the researchers in a lab. (ecnmag.com)
  • 3D structures of proteins with coordinated Mn 2+ ions from bacteria with low, average, and high genomic GC-content have been analyzed (149 PDB files were used). (hindawi.com)
  • In the group of proteins from GC-rich bacteria glutamic acid residues situated in alpha helices frequently coordinate Mn 2+ ions, probably, because of the decrease of Lys usage under the influence of mutational GC-pressure. (hindawi.com)
  • This domain is found in a variety of polyhedral organelle shell proteins (CcmK), including CsoS1A, CsoS1B and CsoS1C of Thiobacillus neapolitanus (Halothiobacillus neapolitanus) and their orthologs from other bacteria. (ebi.ac.uk)
  • Researchers at Inserm Unit 1073, "Nutrition, inflammation and dysfunction of the gut-brain axis" (Inserm/University of Rouen) have demonstrated the involvement of a protein produced by some intestinal bacteria that may be the source of these disorders. (eurekalert.org)
  • This protein (ClpB) is produced by certain bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, which are naturally present in the intestinal flora. (eurekalert.org)
  • Bacterial toxins are involved in the pathogenesis of many bacteria, some of which are responsible for severe diseases in human and animals, but can also be used as tools in cell biology to dissect cellular processes or used as therapeutic agents. (elsevier.com)
  • Expansins are wall-loosening proteins that are universal in the plant kingdom and are also found in a small set of phylogenetically diverse bacteria, fungi, and other organisms, most of which colonize plant surfaces. (springer.com)
  • GroEL and additional proteins from insect bacteria probably are delivered to plants through insect saliva and contribute to shaping plant-insect interactions. (redorbit.com)
  • Engineers have shown that a protein vital to the ability of certain bacteria to break down cellulose, one of the most widespread biochemical processes on earth, speeds up the process by corralling enzymes together and ushering them into action. (rochester.edu)
  • Pound for pound, certain bacteria are the real giants of the cellulose-degradation world: They can be 50 times as effective at breaking down cellulose per protein base, says Wu, associate professor of chemical engineering and microbiology and immunology at the University of Rochester. (rochester.edu)
  • Proteins are an important part of all living organisms, and bacteria are no exception. (wisegeek.com)
  • Thanks to the fact that many bacteria are easy to culture in the laboratory, a great deal of research on bacterial proteins has been performed with the goal of learning more about specific proteins and their functions. (wisegeek.com)
  • Understanding bacterial proteins is important both because bacteria play a very active role in human health, and because the information can be extrapolated to gather more data about the proteins associated with larger organisms, including humans. (wisegeek.com)
  • Over time, many bacteria have evolved to produce proteins which target particular locations on human and animal cells. (wisegeek.com)
  • Understanding which proteins are involved in the structure of particular bacteria can help researchers develop medications which identify and target a particular bacterial protein, allowing the researchers to create antibacterial drugs which target specific organisms. (wisegeek.com)
  • Some bacteria produce proteins which have a deleterious effect on the human body. (wisegeek.com)
  • A bacterial protein can be toxic, causing illness or death in an organism which has been infected by the bacteria, and bacterial proteins can also bind with specific proteins in the body to cause a variety of symptoms. (wisegeek.com)
  • AvrPtoB s function is remarkable not only because its amino acid sequence is so different from other ubiquitin ligases, but also because bacteria don t use ubiquitin to recycle their own proteins. (innovations-report.com)
  • Bacterial ice-nucleation proteins is a family of proteins that enable Gram-negative bacteria to promote nucleation of ice at relatively high temperatures (above -5C). (wikipedia.org)
  • Correct protein compartmentalization is a key step for molecular function and cell viability, and this is especially true for membrane and externalized proteins of bacteria. (nih.gov)
  • Most people don't realize that they actually are walking around with more bacterial cells in their bodies than their own cells, so we are really bags of bacteria," explains Dr. Pal. (genengnews.com)
  • We analyzed the amino acid sequences of DnaK from many bacteria and found that the DnaK proteins from bacteria associated with cancer grouped together were different DnaK sequences from bacteria that are not associated with cancer," said Dr. Tettelin . (biospace.com)
  • According to Dr. Gallo , "This hit-and-run, or hide, mechanism mediated by a protein common to many cancer-associated bacteria changes how we need to think about infection and at least some cancers. (biospace.com)
  • During listeria infection, this protein promotes the release of cytokines which help the body eliminate the bacteria. (pasteur.fr)
  • Cells that detect the bacteria respond by producing proteins called Interferons and other signaling proteins that activate the body's immune system to fight the infection. (pasteur.fr)
  • However, the research work carried out by Dr Lilliana Radoshevich, from the Bacteria-Cell Interactions Unit led by Prof. Pascale Cossart at the Institut Pasteur, indicates that the initial ISG15 production does not depend on Interferon proteins. (pasteur.fr)
  • Strikingly, ISG15 modifies proteins in the cell to promote the release of proteins called cytokines that help the body to eliminate the bacteria. (pasteur.fr)
  • Bacterial effectors are proteins secreted by pathogenic bacteria into the cells of their host, usually using a type 3 secretion system (TTSS/T3SS), a type 4 secretion system (TFSS/T4SS) or a Type VI secretion system (T6SS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Phagocytes recognize bacteria directly [e.g., through the so-called scavenger receptor A which recognizes bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) ] or indirectly through antibodies (IgG) and complement proteins (C3bi) which coat the bacteria and are recognized by the Fcγ receptors and integrinαmβ2 (complement receptor 3). (wikipedia.org)
  • In a recent paper in the journal PLoS One ,* researchers at NIST and Vilnius University (Vilnius, Lithuania) reported that they were able to reveal the presence of G. vaginalis by rapidly detecting and quantifying vaginolysin (VLY), a protein toxin produced exclusively by the bacteria, using the NIST model of cell membranes known as a tethered bilayer lipid membrane (tBLM). (medindia.net)
  • The Sln1 protein of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has sequence similarities to both the histidine kinase and the response regulator proteins of bacteria. (sciencemag.org)
  • Bacteria hunker down and survive antibiotic attack when a protein flips a chemical switch that throws them into a dormant state until treatment abates, researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report in the Jan.16 edition of Science. (rxpgnews.com)
  • HipA is a type of protein kinase that is uncommon in bacteria, said lead author Maria Schumacher, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry and molecular biology. (rxpgnews.com)
  • While other types of phosphorylation occur in bacteria, HipA phosphorylates proteins at their serine or threonine amino acids. (rxpgnews.com)
  • HipA is active in other types of gram-negative bacteria, which cause significant human bacterial infections. (rxpgnews.com)
  • Protein kinases often bind to more than one protein, so there are likely multiple targets for the protein in E. coli and other gram-negative bacteria, Schumacher and Brennan said. (rxpgnews.com)
  • A bacterial library is a large number of different DNA sequences (hundreds, millions or even billions), each of which is cloned into a vector and introduced into a bacterial cell , so there are a great many different DNA sequences represented within the individual bacteria in the library - one in each bacterium. (sciencelearn.org.nz)
  • To use the library, scientists test the bacteria within it to see which of the many protein variants function best. (sciencelearn.org.nz)
  • Scientists have uncovered the structure of the protein complex that assembles the tiny hair-like strands that cover the outside of bacteria. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Published in Nature, scientists at the Institute of Structural and Molecular Biology (a joint institute between University College London (UCL) and Birkbeck) have revealed the structure of a complex protein called FimD that acts as an assembly platform for the pili of cystitis bacteria. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Pili protein subunits are made inside bacteria and initially transported through the inner cell wall. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • This research, funded by the Medical Research Council, has isolated and crystallised the usher protein in cystitis bacteria, FimD, while it's bound to the chaperone/subunit combination. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • Mass spectrometry approaches generally rely upon introduction of the bacteria into a matrix-assisted laser-desorption time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometer with mass spectrometric recognition of proteins specific to that organism that form a reliable fingerprint. (mdpi.com)
  • With some bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Clostridium botulinum , the health threat posed by these organisms is not the organism itself, but rather the protein toxins produced by the organisms. (mdpi.com)
  • Spatial organization within bacteria is fundamental to many cellular processes, although the basic mechanisms underlying localization of proteins to specific sites within bacteria are poorly understood. (harvard.edu)
  • To do this, Lamont and his colleagues compared the proteins secreted by P. gingivalis when grown in a medium containing human gum cell proteins with the proteins produced by the bacteria when grown in a neutral medium. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Computer-generated image of anaerobic, spore-forming, Clostridium bacteria CDC, JAMES ARCHER Researchers at Harvard Medical School used software to run through roughly 60,000 bacterial genomes in search of proteins that, in yeast, would be predicted to behave as prions -that is, become misfolded in a way that passes on the errant structure to like proteins. (the-scientist.com)
  • The study, published last week (January 13) in Science , is the first to identify a prion-like protein in bacteria, " suggesting that the emergence of prions predates the evolutionary split between eukaryotes and bacteria," the authors, from Harvard Medical School, wrote. (the-scientist.com)
  • Because prions pass on their misfolded shape to like proteins, they may allow bacteria evolve without genomic changes. (the-scientist.com)
  • Bacteria might need quick responses to their environment, such as dealing with antibiotics," Peter Chien, a bacterial biochemist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who was not involved in the research, told Nature . (the-scientist.com)
  • Nevertheless, the discovery of a prion-like protein in bacteria suggests that this molecular behavior is more common than researchers realized, coauthor Ann Hochschild, a bacterial geneticist at Harvard Medical School, told Nature . (the-scientist.com)
  • We believe other prion-forming proteins will be uncovered in bacteria. (the-scientist.com)
  • Bacteria use a variety of secretion systems to transport proteins beyond their cell membrane to interact with their environment. (mcponline.org)
  • A group of proteins that act as the bodys built-in line of defense against invading bacteria use a molecular trick to induce bacteria to destroy themselves, researchers at the Indiana University School of Medicine have determined. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • The proteins, called Peptidoglycan Recognition Proteins (PGRPs), are able to detect and target bacteria because bacteria are unique in having peptidoglycan polymers in their cellular walls. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • These systems, which normally enable the bacteria to detect and eject malformed proteins, interpret the PGRPs as just such malformed proteins. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Surface proteins on bacteria play a key role in immune system defences and are studied as part of research into vaccines. (sciencephoto.com)
  • IMPORTANCE The bacterial cell wall component LPS is a strong inducer of inflammation and is responsible for much of the toxicity of Gram-negative bacteria. (asm.org)
  • How to get electrons from the inside of bacteria to the outside is important for many different things, such as bacterial fuel cells, how carbon cycles through the environment and how to make new nanomaterials for applications like biocomputers," said Reardon. (bio-medicine.org)
  • A group of related bacteria makes these bendy, stretchy structures out of a protein called pilin, and an even smaller group uses these structures like electrical wires. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Bacteria produce electrons while respiring and use the wires to run electrons out of their little bacterial bodies. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Co-Lead researcher Dr. Hugh Reid, from Monash University, said the team showed, at the molecular level, how receptors isolated from immune T cells from celiac disease patients can recognize protein fragments from certain bacteria that mimic those fragments from gluten. (scitechdaily.com)
  • In celiac disease you get aberrant reactivity to gluten and we have provided a proof-of-principle that there's a link between gluten proteins and proteins that are found in some bacteria," he said. (scitechdaily.com)
  • Two of these, transcription and translation, allow the genetic information stored in DNA to be deciphered into the proteins that form all living things, from bacteria to humans to plants. (wisc.edu)
  • In bacteria, the machine that reads DNA to turn it into a message and the machine that translates the message into protein are combined into single complex or "supermachine. (wisc.edu)
  • Following that process, another molecular machine called a ribosome translates the RNA, more specifically called messenger RNA, into proteins the bacteria can use to function. (wisc.edu)
  • We use this to measure the geometric localization of proteins responsible for the characteristic shape of Gram-negative bacteria (straight rod Escherichia coli , curved rod Vibrio cholerae , and helical rod Helicobacter pylori) . (aps.org)
  • 2,5,6 However, the efficiency of these methods is low when compared to the recently, developed approaches using bacterial N -linked and O -linked glycosylation machinery to produce glycoproteins directly in bacteria. (rsc.org)
  • However, the requirement to generate lipid-linked glycosyl donors and the localization of protein glycosylation in the periplasm makes it challenging to integrate these approaches with the impressive array of oligosaccharides that have been produced in the cytosol of engineered bacteria. (rsc.org)
  • Moreover, although the abundance of most protein groups reflected that of related bacterial populations, we found a specific independent regulation of bacteria-derived cell envelope proteins. (bmj.com)
  • Recent proteomic reports of Bacillus subtilis have shown that many proteins with Sec-like signal peptides and absence of a transmembrane helix domain are still observed in membrane-enriched fractions, but further evidence about signal peptide cleavage or soluble protein contamination is still needed. (nih.gov)
  • Label-free quantitation of all proteins identified in each fraction showed that the majority of these proteins with uncleaved signal peptides are, indeed, enriched in the Triton X-114 lipid phase. (nih.gov)
  • The protein influences host IFN [interferon] responses as well as suppresses multiple host microbicidal activities involving serum complement, neutrophils, and antimicrobial peptides," write the investigators. (genengnews.com)
  • thorough investigation revealed heparin-binding protein (HBP) and human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) as the mediators of the macrophage response to PMN secretion. (jci.org)
  • Dissecting the underlying molecular mechanisms for localization is facilitated by the availability of suitable proteins that can be used as molecular probes. (pnas.org)
  • Abramovitch and Martin compared AvrPtoB s amino acid sequence to known proteins in other microbes and in higher organisms, but found no matches that might hint at how the protein works at the molecular level. (innovations-report.com)
  • To confirm that AvrPtoB was a molecular mimic, Martin and Abramovitch altered parts of the protein that correspond to crucial sites on ubiquitin ligase. (innovations-report.com)
  • In a paper published in Molecular Cell in December, Walker and others reported that UmuD had an unexpected role involving yet another protein in the SOS system. (phys.org)
  • Enhancement of the nonresonant second order molecular hyperpolarizabilities {gamma} were observed in stacked macrocyclic molecular systems, previously in a {micro}-oxo silicon phthalocyanine (SiPcO) monomer, dimer and trimer series, and now in bacteriochlorophyll a (BChla) arrays of light harvesting (LH) proteins. (unt.edu)
  • for each macrocycle was enhanced in naturally occurring stacked macrocyclic molecular systems in the bacterial photosynthetic LH proteins where BChla`s are arranged in tilted face-to-face arrays. (unt.edu)
  • In this study, they used cutting-edge molecular research techniques to map all the proteins ?known as the proteome ?produced by P. gingivalis. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The approach used in this study is very exciting,?said Hansel Fletcher, Ph.D., an associate professor of microbiology and molecular genetics at Loma Linda University in Loma Linda, Calif. "For the first time, we are able to see that the more than 200 so-called 'hypothetical?proteins in P. gingivalis are expressed and have specific functions. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The bacterial SRP, which contains the minimal ribonucleoprotein core of this universally conserved targeting machine, has served as a paradigm for understanding the molecular basis of protein localization in all cells. (caltech.edu)
  • In this review, we highlight recent biochemical and structural insights into the molecular mechanisms by which fundamental challenges faced by protein targeting machineries are met in the SRP pathway. (caltech.edu)
  • Ishu Saraogi, Shu-ou Shan, Co-translational protein targeting to the bacterial membrane, Biochimica et Biophysica Acta (BBA) - Molecular Cell Research, Volume 1843, Issue 8, August 2014, Pages 1433-1441, ISSN 0167-4889, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2013.10.013. (caltech.edu)
  • Conclusions This study provides the first evidence that quantifiable bacterial protein signals are associated with CD, which can have a profound impact on future molecular diagnosis. (bmj.com)
  • However, exoenzyme C3 is not a toxin, and chimeric proteins fusing C3 with the B moiety of either diphtheria toxin or Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A have been produced to intoxicate cells with low concentration of C3. (nih.gov)
  • Karla Satchell, a professor in microbiology-immunology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, and her team demonstrated in a paper in Nature Communications , that a multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) protein from Vibrio vulnificus can inhibit tumor cell growth by cutting the protein Ras. (eurekalert.org)
  • The scientists plan to continue to study the mechanisms and biochemistry of the MARTX toxin specificity to the Ras protein. (eurekalert.org)
  • 11 We have devised an alternative strategy for glycoprotein production that uses the toxin B glucosyltransferase from Clostridium difficile to produce site-specific homogeneous glucosylated proteins. (rsc.org)
  • In vitro analysis shows similar protein glucosylation activity in the isolated domain as in the full length toxin. (rsc.org)
  • 14 Here, we report the discovery and characterization of a nine amino acid peptide substrate for the toxin B glucosyltransferase domain (GTD) and its applications as a protein tag for site-specific and homogenous glycoprotein engineering ( Fig. 1 ). (rsc.org)
  • Fig. 1 Glucosylation of peptide consensus on a protein of interest (POI) with C. difficile toxin B. (rsc.org)
  • Scientists believe that antibiotics could be developed that disrupt the FimD protein, and therefore the production line of pili proteins. (ucl.ac.uk)
  • The iron-sequestering polymer is capable of delaying bacterial growth and increasing the sensitivity of wild type (wt) P. aeruginosa to the antibiotics ciprofloxacin and gentamicin. (ku.edu)
  • This will help physicians to prescribe antibiotics to only those with bacterial pneumonia and avoid antibiotic use in those with pure viral pneumonia, thus help to limit health-care cost and to decrease emergence of antibiotic resistance. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • 7-10 The enzymes involved transfer lipid-linked glycans, generated en masse in the cytoplasm, to protein targets in the periplasm. (rsc.org)
  • This approach will enable glycoproteins to be produced in the bacterial cytoplasm with endogenous nucleotide sugar donors. (rsc.org)
  • This system comprises a hollow needle-like structure localized on the surface of bacterial cells that injects specific bacterial proteins, the so-called effectors, directly into the cytoplasm of a host cell. (rostlab.org)
  • This review summarizes our current knowledge on the mechanisms of bacterial adherence to extracellular matrices and on the biological significance of these interactions. (nih.gov)
  • Protein localization mechanisms dictate the functional and structural specialization of cells. (pnas.org)
  • Mechanisms exist in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to direct specialized proteins to distinct subcellular sites where they execute topologically constrained functions, for example, morphogenesis ( 1 ). (pnas.org)
  • This review will summarize recent developments in understanding the biochemical and structural mechanisms utilized by bacterial pathogens to interact with the host ubiquitination pathways. (frontiersin.org)
  • Utpal Pal, Ph.D., professor in veterinary medicine, isolated a protein produced by Borrelia burgdorferi that disables one of the body's first immune responses, giving insight into mechanisms that are largely not understood. (genengnews.com)
  • This review summarises the different families of bacterial metal-sensing transcriptional regulators and discusses current knowledge regarding the mechanisms of metal-regulated gene expression and the structural features of sensory metal- binding sites focusing on the ArsR-SmtB family. (rsc.org)
  • This approach is different than those employed by other anti-bacterial mechanisms, such as the immune systems white blood cells, Dziarski says. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Streptococcal incubation with putative inhibitors indicates multiple binding mechanisms of a lectin-like and protein nature, possibly involving protein receptors. (ovid.com)
  • Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitidis have very similar mechanisms of resistance to penicillin G, which are mediated by the decreased affinity of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) ( 1 - 3 ). (cdc.gov)
  • Such fluctuations are known to differ in both timescale and magnitude, from rotation of methyl groups (nanoseconds) to the flipping of buried tyrosine rings (seconds)(2,3), Because many mechanisms for protein function require conformational change, it has been proposed that some of these ground-state fluctuations are related to protein function(4). (rti.org)
  • This project aims to repurpose these mechanisms to facilitate the delivery of therapeutic proteins to neurones. (bl.uk)
  • SecA is a central component of the general secretion system that is essential for bacterial growth and thus an ideal target for antimicrobial agents. (wiley.com)
  • We focused on a protein called DnaK, which is part of a family of proteins that function as a 'chaperone' for other proteins protecting them from damage or helping them to fold," said Dr. Zella . (biospace.com)
  • NLRP6 belongs to a family of proteins that are part of the innate immune response that serves as the first line of defense. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • Cheng, X., Xiao, X. and Chou, K.C. (2018) pLoc-mGneg Predict Subcellular Localization of Gram-Negative Bacterial Proteins by Deep Gene Ontology Learning via General PseAAC. (scirp.org)
  • A dual-purpose expression vector was designed, allowing efficient display of Affibody molecules, as well as small-scale protein production and purification of selected candidates without the need for sub-cloning. (diva-portal.org)
  • Norgen Biotek Corp., an innovative privately held Canadian biotechnology company focusing primarily on nucleic acid and protein stabilization and purification, as well as providing high quality services to the scientific community, today announced that it has become Propel-Certified through Illumina as a Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) service provider. (the-scientist.com)
  • The SoluLyse Reagent is tested to be compatible with all popular purification methods, such as Ni and glutathione resins for purifying poly-His and GST-tagged proteins. (amsbio.com)
  • This could be a target to develop new anti-bacterial applications," Dziarski adds. (infectioncontroltoday.com)
  • When this approach is combined with the intermediates of bacterial O -antigen biosynthesis the resulting conjugates are valuable as potential anti-bacterial vaccine components. (rsc.org)
  • The best studied is the carboxysome of Halothiobacillus neapolitanus, which is composed of at least 9 proteins: six shell proteins, CsoS1A, CsoS1B, CsoS1C, Cso2A, Cso2B and CsoS3 (carbonic anhydrase) [ PMID: 14729686 ], one protein of unknown function and the large and small subunits of RuBisCo (CbbL and Cbbs). (ebi.ac.uk)
  • Here we explore the feasibility of extracting bacterial protein signals relevant to CD, by interrogating myriads of intestinal bacterial proteomes from a small number of patients and healthy controls. (bmj.com)
  • Once proteins bind, they can trigger a reaction which may vary from an immune system response to an infection to the onset of a disease. (wisegeek.com)
  • Our work provides an explanation for how a bacterial infection can trigger a series of events that lead to cancer. (biospace.com)
  • Ultimately, ISG15 is important for viral and bacterial infection and its levels are increased in human cancers, therefore in the future being able to modulate its activity could be a promising therapeutic strategy for a number of important human diseases. (pasteur.fr)
  • Host guanylate binding proteins (GBPs) promote infection-induced caspase-11 activation in tissue culture models, and yet their in vivo role in LPS-mediated sepsis has remained unexplored. (asm.org)
  • 3 years of age are at increased risk of clinically undetectable serious bacterial infection (SBI). (aappublications.org)
  • 6 Other causes of SBI include occult bacterial pneumonia (3%), 7 meningitis, or less commonly bone and joint infection, deep soft tissue abscess, or bacterial enteritis. (aappublications.org)
  • Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more 76 amino acid polypeptide ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to the lysine residues of target proteins. (frontiersin.org)
  • This common binding site for delta, Pol IV and alpha subunit is shown to be formed by residues that are highly conserved among many bacterial beta homologs, thus defining an evolutionarily conserved hydrophobic crevice for sliding clamp ligands and a new target for antibiotic drug design. (rcsb.org)
  • Different representatives of each of the sensor families can regulate gene expression in response to different metals, and the residues that form the sensory metal- binding sites have been defined in a number of these proteins . (rsc.org)
  • If a homolog is not available, pEffect triggers an SVM that predicts effector proteins through searches of k -consecutive residues that are known from annotated proteins. (rostlab.org)
  • These studies also allowed the lab to determine the key residues in both proteins that stabilize the BfrB:Bfd complex. (ku.edu)
  • We show that by mutating residues in the B-pores of the protein, we affect the function of the relatively distant ferroxidase center, which in turn inhibits iron oxidation and uptake. (ku.edu)
  • Effector proteins may have many different activities, but usually help the pathogen to invade host tissue, suppress its immune system, or otherwise help the pathogen to survive. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yersinia inhibits phagocytosis through the concerted actions of several effector proteins, including YopE which acts as a RhoGAP and inhibits Rac-dependent actin polymerization. (wikipedia.org)
  • For a query protein it first runs PSI-BLAST to identify a homolog in the set of known and annotated effector proteins. (rostlab.org)
  • If such a homolog is available, then its annotation ( i.e. type III effector) is being transferred to a query protein. (rostlab.org)
  • The graphs were obtained using the homology-reduced sets of 115 type III effector and 3,460 non-effector proteins in five-fold cross-validation. (rostlab.org)
  • Very importantly, the potency of these fluorescein analogues in inhibiting the truncated SecA ATPase correlates with their ability to inhibit the biologically relevant protein translocation activity of SecA. (wiley.com)
  • The present study examines the translocation HCO_3-, CO_2 and O_2 through the central pores of different isoforms of shell protein complexes from alpha and beta cyanobacteria. (caltech.edu)
  • Optimization of Mutation Pressure in Relation to Properties of Protein-Coding Sequences in Bacterial Genomes. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • In order to study the optimization of the pressure, we compared mutational transition probability matrices from bacterial genomes with artificial matrices fulfilling the same general features as the real ones, e.g., the stationary distribution and the speed of convergence to the stationarity. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • We observed no substantial differences between the effects of mutational matrices on protein-coding sequences in genomes under study in respect of differently replicated DNA strands, mutational cost types and properties of the referenced artificial matrices. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • The likely involvement of this bacterial protein in disordered eating behaviour in humans was established by analysing data from 60 patients. (eurekalert.org)
  • Bacterial proteins are of interest to humans for a number of reasons. (wisegeek.com)
  • The discovery of the noncanonical inflammasome protein caspase-11 in mice and CASP-4/-5 in humans as cytosolic sensors for LPS is more recent ( 6 ), and accordingly, little is known about the existence of additional host factors controlling its activity. (asm.org)
  • Protein kinases PknA and PknB independently and coordinately regulate essential Mycobacterium tuberculosis physiologies and antimicrobial susceptibility. (harvard.edu)