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  • pneumonia
  • Pneumonia Fever Rigors Cough Runny nose (either direct bacterial pneumonia or accompanied by primary viral pneumonia) Dyspnea - shortness of breath Chest pain Shaking chills Pneumococcal pneumonia can cause coughing up of blood, or hemoptysis, characteristically associated with "rusty" sputum Streptococcus pneumoniae (J13) is the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia in all age groups except newborn infants. (wikipedia.org)
  • This results in the fever, chills, and fatigue common in bacterial and fungal pneumonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotics are the treatment of choice for bacterial pneumonia, with ventilation (oxygen supplement) as supportive therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention of bacterial pneumonia is by vaccination against Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine for adults and pneumococcal conjugate vaccine for children), Haemophilus influenzae type B, meningococcus, Bordetella pertussis, Bacillus anthracis, and Yersinia pestis. (wikipedia.org)
  • colonies
  • These researches on bacterial foraging optimization suggested that predicting and controlling the dynamical behavior of microbial colonies might have profound implications in reality. (hindawi.com)
  • The formation of patterns in the growth of bacterial colonies has extensively been studied experimentally. (wikipedia.org)
  • A large number of studies on pattern formation in bacterial colonies have been performed in Bacillus subtilis and in Proteus mirabilis. (wikipedia.org)
  • protein
  • This protein influences bacterial lifestyle decisions by binding to the 5' untranslated and/or early coding regions of mRNA targets, causing changes in translation initiation, RNA stability, and/or transcription elongation. (nih.gov)
  • Ubiquitin Bacterial (UBact) is a ubiquitin-like protein that is homologus to Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup). (wikipedia.org)
  • The terms 'Ubiquitin Bacterial' and 'Prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein' suggest a molecular similarity between ubiquitin and UBact/Pup which is largely absent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bacterial adhesion consists primarily of an intramembranous structural protein which provides a scaffold upon which several extracellular adhesins may be attached. (wikipedia.org)
  • mutations
  • In the presence of single-stranded DNA regions, due to the action of different external cues (that induce mutations), the major bacterial recombinase (RecA) binds to this DNA regions and is activated by the presence of free nucleotide triphosphates. (wikipedia.org)
  • This basic structure is conserved across type 1 fimbrial adhesins though recent studies have shown that in vitro induced mutations can lead to the addition of C-terminal domain specificity resulting in a bacterial adhesion with dual bending sites and related binding phenotypes. (wikipedia.org)
  • coli
  • This paper investigates the behaviors at different developmental stages in Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) lifecycle and developing a new biologically inspired optimization algorithm named bacterial colony optimization (BCO). (hindawi.com)
  • Inspired by the foraging behavior of Escherichia coli ( E. coli ) in human intestines, Passion proposed an optimization algorithm known as bacterial foraging optimization (BFO) recently [ 11 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • It usually consists of polysaccharides, but can be composed of other materials such as polypeptide D-glutamic acid in B. anthracis, and peptidoglycan and muramic acid found in E.coli bacterial capsule. (wikipedia.org)
  • extensively
  • Bacterial lawns (often of Serratia marcescens) are also used extensively when as an assay method when using bacteriophage as tracers in studies of groundwater flow. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • In autecological studies, bacterial growth in batch culture can be modeled with four different phases: lag phase (A), exponential or log phase (B), stationary phase (C), and death phase (D). (princeton.edu)
  • Today many different types and subclasses of bacterial adhesins may be observed in the literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • the basic means requires bacterial enumeration (cell counting) by direct and individual (microscopic, flow cytometry [ 1 ] ), direct and bulk (biomass), indirect and individual (colony counting), or indirect and bulk (most probable number, turbidity, nutrient uptake) methods. (princeton.edu)
  • It is a polysaccharide layer that lies outside the cell envelope, and is thus deemed part of the outer envelope of a bacterial cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • When viewed, bacterial cells as well as the surface they are on, are stained dark, while the capsule remains pale or colorless and appears as a ring, or halo, around the cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • strain
  • Type strain of Erwinia tracheiphila at BacDive - the Bacterial Diversity Metadatabase Brave new world: recent evolution of an insect-transmitted pathogen, a seminar given by Dr. Roberto Kolter on May 17, 2017 at the US NIH. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome are discussed in detail elsewhere. (uptodate.com)
  • See 'Chronic bacterial prostatitis' and 'Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome' . (uptodate.com)
  • exception
  • [Note When bacterial nomenclature was controlled under the Botanical Code , the term division was used, but now that bacterial nomenclature (with the exception of cyanobacteria ) is controlled under the Bacteriological Code , the term phylum is preferred. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • A longitudinal study published in February 2006, in the American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, showed a link between psychosocial stress and bacterial vaginosis persisted even when other risk factors were taken into account. (wikipedia.org)
  • Growth
  • However, if the number surviving exceeds unity on average, the bacterial population undergoes exponential growth . (princeton.edu)
  • This basic batch culture growth model draws out and emphasizes aspects of bacterial growth which may differ from the growth of macrofauna. (princeton.edu)
  • Batch culture is the most common laboratory growth method in which bacterial growth is studied, but it is only one of many. (princeton.edu)
  • It is ideally spatially unstructured and temporally unstructured, in a steady state defined by the rates of nutrient supply and bacterial growth. (princeton.edu)
  • Liquid is not the only laboratory environment for bacterial growth. (princeton.edu)
  • Science aid: Bacterial Growth High school (GCSE, Alevel) resource. (princeton.edu)