• Most bacteria have not been characterised, and only about 27 percent of the bacterial phyla have species that can be grown in the laboratory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the nature of the chemical signals, the signal relay mechanisms, and the target genes controlled by bacterial quorum sensing systems differ, in every case the ability to communicate with one another allows bacteria to coordinate the gene expression, and therefore the behavior, of the entire community. (nih.gov)
  • If your bacteria are a Gram negative strain, these agents will remove the stain from the bacterial cell walls. (wikihow.com)
  • Spreading Terran bacteria to other worlds is a no-no, for obvious reasons, so spacecraft are routinely sterilized to prevent any bacterial hitch-hikers. (universetoday.com)
  • Finally, he points to evidence that antibiotic use permanently changes the composition of the gut microbiome, altering the balance of bacterial species and maintaining resistant bacteria in the gut. (wired.com)
  • Motors made from bacterial flagella have been used as novel "nano-actuators" before (see Bacteria harnessed as miniature pumps ), but Metin Sitti and Bahareh Behkam of Carnegie Mellon University in Pennsylvania, US, have taken another approach. (newscientist.com)
  • Bacteria are robust machines that can easily be integrated with other microscopic components and do not need to be purified or reconstituted, as detached bacterial components must be. (newscientist.com)
  • However, gene sequences can be used to reconstruct the bacterial phylogeny, and these studies indicate that bacteria diverged first from the archaeal/eukaryotic lineage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers at UC Berkeley covered bacteria with small. (inhabitat.com)
  • Researchers have theorized that some purple bacteria are related to the mitochondria , symbiotic bacteria in plant and animal cells today that act as organelles. (wikipedia.org)
  • To test it against E. faecalis , the researchers first grew the bacteria into a biofilm, which they exposed to the plasma jet. (popularmechanics.com)
  • The researchers think they can now develop artificial signals to interfere with this signal process and that this could lead to new treatments for antibiotic-resistant bacteria. (zdnet.com)
  • David Spring , Martin Welch , their respective research groups and James T. Hodgkinson "explain that researchers long have known that bacteria communicate with each other. (zdnet.com)
  • First evidence that bacteria can acquire human genes has come to light in a new study by US researchers who found a fragment of human DNA in Neisseria gonorrhoeae , the bacterium that causes gonorrhea , one of the oldest recorded human diseases. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers discovered the gene transfer from human to bacteria when the Broad Institute in Cambridge, Massachusetts, sequenced the genomes of 14 gonorrhea clinical isolates and found three of them had a fragment of DNA that had an identical sequence to an L1 DNA element found in humans. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The researchers also examined a close genetic relative of gonorrhea, the bacterium Neisseria meningitidis that causes meningitis . (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • The computer programme developed by researchers at Stanford University is an exact replica of the Mycoplasma genitalium bacterium, including its DNA and all the other components of its single cell. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • The researchers attached nanoparticles to the outside of bacteria and linked DNA to the nanoparticles. (wired.com)
  • In an article in the Wall Street Journal today describing the technology, James L. Hedrick of International Business Machines Corp., one of the researchers, said the destruction of the bacteria renders it unable to develop resistance to the nanoparticles. (foreignpolicy.com)
  • Using an analytical framework, the researchers created the first catalog of human gut bacteria that have "neuroactive" potential. (medscape.com)
  • In a study that focused solely on wipes, researchers concluded that instead of preventing hospital-acquired infections like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( MRSA ) the wipes could actually be spreading bacteria when used improperly by hospital staffers. (webmd.com)
  • But in a study presented today in Boston at the annual meeting of the American Society for Microbiology, researchers from Cardiff University's Welsh School of Pharmacy reported that when used improperly the wipes may spread bacteria rather than remove or kill them. (webmd.com)
  • The researchers used the wipes in this way in laboratory tests designed to measure their ability to remove and kill the bacteria that cause staph infections , including MRSA. (webmd.com)
  • Even some wipes that claimed to kill bacteria were found to transfer live bacteria from one surface to another, the researchers report. (webmd.com)
  • For example, when the researchers shone two separate lights at the cells, they saw two focused bright spots and the bacteria appeared to integrate the information, heading off in an intermediate direction. (bbc.co.uk)
  • The material's unique properties allowed the researchers to construct a small, flexible device able to detect bacteria at a much higher sensitivity level than traditional methods. (princeton.edu)
  • In tests, the researchers detected samples of bacteria that can cause surgical infections and others that can lead to stomach ulcers. (princeton.edu)
  • Researchers have been experimenting with bacteria that can produce fuels such as hydrogen and methane, as well as those that can remove carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas, from the air. (technologyreview.com)
  • But now, U.S. researchers have found a way to use bacteria to steady buildings against earthquakes by turning these sandy soils into rocks. (zdnet.com)
  • Interestingly enough, a team of researchers from Northwestern University recently conducted a study with bacteria that was kept aboard the ISS. (universetoday.com)
  • Bacteria from the soil were found across the home, but were most common on the exterior door trim, the researchers found. (yahoo.com)
  • In their efforts to find new approaches to fighting harmful bacteria without harming the microbiome, researchers are actively studying how our microbial populations protect us and how microbial imbalances cause disease. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Now, researchers in the US may have found a solution to this problem, by exploiting the natural movement of bacteria to propel micro-objects through water. (newscientist.com)
  • A 2007 article in the journal Neuroscience reported that researchers at the University of Bristol in the United Kingdom found that mice who were fed rewards containing the bacteria produced more serotonin, the mood-regulating neurotransmitter targeted by common antidepressants such as Prozac. (newsday.com)
  • Through this they made a near-perfect mimic of the children's gut bacteria, allowing the researchers to see how those bacteria react to changes in diet, and to do other experiments, such as faecal transplants, that would be difficult or impossible with the children themselves. (scientificamerican.com)
  • In a 2018 Frontiers in Energy Research [ de ] article, it has been suggested that purple bacteria can be used as a biorefinery . (wikipedia.org)
  • Acinetobacter bacteria are fairly common microbes that can be found in many parts of the environment. (brighthub.com)
  • NASA keeps a close eye on the bacteria inhabiting the International Space Station with a program called the Microbial Observatory (M.O.) The ISS is home to a variety of microbes, some of which pose a threat to the health of astronauts. (universetoday.com)
  • These advantageous microbes provide a protective front against harmful germs by creating a layer of bacteria called a "biofilm. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Research shows that reduced exposure to microbes early in life impairs the immune system's ability to identify detrimental bacteria from harmless substances like pollen and peanuts. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Cite this: Gut Bacteria Tied to Depression - Medscape - Feb 11, 2019. (medscape.com)
  • The bacteria thrive in warm saltwater. (medicinenet.com)
  • The bacteria thrive in warm water, so concentrations of the bacteria are higher during the summer months," says Carina Blackmore, PhD, Florida's acting state epidemiologist. (medicinenet.com)
  • As icky as they may seem, bacteria play a crucial role in helping humanity thrive. (howstuffworks.com)
  • The reason for this, according to the research team, is that the formation of these types of rocks is controlled by a form of ancient and hardy bacteria here on Earth that are able to thrive in conditions similar to what Mars experiences today. (universetoday.com)
  • It was suggested that bacteria thrive in the Mariana Trench, which with a depth of up to 11 kilometres is the deepest known part of the oceans. (wikipedia.org)
  • The figure above shows "the quorum sensing systems of several bacteria, V. fischeri , A. tumefaciens , and P. aeruginosa , including the structures of the small AHL molecules (also known as N-acylated homoserine lactones) which are used by these bacteria. (zdnet.com)
  • 70 known LuxIR quorum-sensing systems in Gram-negative bacteria ( 1 , 12 - 14 ). (pnas.org)
  • The evolution of quorum sensing systems in bacteria could, therefore, have been one of the early steps in the development of multicellularity. (nih.gov)
  • Tape your petri plate closed after collection and do DO NOT REOPEN IT - you could have collected harmful bacteria. (google.com)
  • Total coliforms are not necessarily harmful, but they can indicate contamination by fecal bacteria and are not desirable in drinking water. (google.com)
  • Some bacteria are harmful, but most serve a useful purpose. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • For example, a number of studies have found obese individuals tend to have a less diverse gut microbiome, 5 in addition to having greater numbers of certain harmful bacteria and fewer beneficial ones. (organicconsumers.org)
  • On the contrary, this use of common bacteria to 'cement' sands has no harmful effects on the environment. (zdnet.com)
  • Friendly bacteria may seem like an oxymoron-we have been conditioned to believe that bacteria are harmful and make people sick. (prweb.com)
  • Without differentiating which bacteria are present in the samples, there's no way to know for sure if a sample is harmful. (tucsonweekly.com)
  • Without the ability to control the growing environment, outdoor growers are prone to bacteria on their flower, even if none of it is harmful. (tucsonweekly.com)
  • Some bacteria are beneficial to humans (for example, those that live in the stomach and aid digestion ), and some are harmful (for example, those that cause disease). (dictionary.com)
  • In an ominous first, last month the CDC said antibiotic-resistant bacteria had been found in food for the first time . (newser.com)
  • It was found that the bacteria moved quickly away from even the slightest trace of oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Your lab team will form a question and hypothesis about bacteria found at school and then create an experiment to answer your question. (google.com)
  • Bacteria are found everywhere. (google.com)
  • Fecal coliform is a group of bacteria found in the intestinal tracts of warm-blooded animals, including humans and livestock. (google.com)
  • Some of these bacteria were found living near vents and active volcanoes on the lightless ocean floor. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 1993, scientists found many new species of chemoautotrophic bacteria living in fissured rock far below the ocean floor. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Koo found that cranberry juice makes it difficult for the bacteria Streptococcus mutans to cling to tooth surfaces. (nature.com)
  • Koo's team found that cranberry juice prevents bacteria from forming plaque by inhibiting the enzyme. (nature.com)
  • In analyzing data from 1054 individuals enrolled in the Flemish Gut Flora Project (FGFP), investigators found two groups of bacteria - Coprococcus and Dialister - were consistently depleted in people diagnosed with depression, regardless of antidepressant treatment. (medscape.com)
  • They also found that Faecalibacterium and Coprococcus bacteria were consistently associated with higher quality of life indicators. (medscape.com)
  • Some bacteria were found to have a broad range of these functions. (medscape.com)
  • But as research has progressed, experts now believe the two cooperate in various regards, with gut bacteria now found to be deeply involved in the maintenance of the entire body-something once regarded as the purview of the immune system. (newsweek.com)
  • In Los Angeles, similar bacteria counts failed to materialize, though a few beaches near stream and river mouths where contaminants are found were posted for elevated bacteria counts. (latimes.com)
  • Capsule: A layer found on the outside of the cell wall in some bacteria. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Previous research has demonstrated that probiotics - beneficial bacteria found in fermented and cultured foods such as yogurt - have a measurable effect on your metabolism. (organicconsumers.org)
  • In the United States, the bacteria have been found primarily in healthcare facilities and hospitals and are known to prey on the weak. (freerepublic.com)
  • Bacteria related to human skin were found most frequently on pillowcases and toilet seats - as were bacteria commonly found in human feces . (yahoo.com)
  • Bacteria from leaves and produce were found most often on door trims and also on kitchen surfaces. (yahoo.com)
  • Mycobacterium vaccae, a naturally occurring friendly bacteria found in soil, has been the focus of research in the United States, England and elsewhere for more than a decade, and the findings are impressive. (newsday.com)
  • The bacteria do not match any species found on Earth. (cnn.com)
  • The word bacteria is the plural of the New Latin bacterium , which is the latinisation of the Greek βακτήριον ( bakterion ), the diminutive of βακτηρία ( bakteria ), meaning "staff, cane", because the first ones to be discovered were rod-shaped . (wikipedia.org)
  • Eubacterium , plural eubacteria , also called bacteria , term formerly used to describe and differentiate any of a group of prokaryotic true bacteria from the archaebacteria. (britannica.com)
  • 1847, plural of Modern Latin bacterium , from Greek bakterion "small staff," diminutive of baktron "stick, rod," from PIE *bak- "staff used for support. (dictionary.com)
  • Plural of bacterium . (dictionary.com)
  • It is important to remember that bacteria is the plural of bacterium, and that saying a bacteria is incorrect. (dictionary.com)
  • The vast majority of the bacteria in the body are rendered harmless by the protective effects of the immune system , though many are beneficial , particularly in the gut flora. (wikipedia.org)
  • The finding that intestinal viruses can substitute for intestinal bacteria to promote the health of their mammalian hosts raises the possibility that viruses in the gut may be beneficial in some circumstances. (nature.com)
  • Germ-free mice are microbiologically sterile, and because of the absence of beneficial bacteria in their intestines they have abnormal intestinal morphology and defective development of immune cells called lymphocytes 7 . (nature.com)
  • Bacteria in Agrobiology: Crop Productivity focus on the role of beneficial bacteria in crop growth, increased nutrient uptake and mobilization, and defense against phytopathogens. (springer.com)
  • The propionic bacteria used in cheese manufacturing may have beneficial effects on health and notably local effects in the colon, where they are metabolically active. (inra.fr)
  • That recognition supports our understanding of Clostridium difficile disease - killing the beneficial bacteria allows C. diff room to surge and produce an overload of toxins - as well as the intense interest in establishing a research program that could demonstrate experimentally whether the vast industry producing probiotic products is doing what it purports to do. (wired.com)
  • These long-term changes to the beneficial bacteria within people's bodies may even increase our susceptibility to infections and disease. (wired.com)
  • Some dispensaries use beneficial bacteria in the soil and throughout the growing process. (tucsonweekly.com)
  • In this lesson students will observe the growth of bacteria over a week's period. (teach-nology.com)
  • observe and record the growth of bacteria growing in Petri dishes for one week. (teach-nology.com)
  • Explain that the students are going to swab their Petri dishes with material from different places in the classroom and illustrate the growth of bacteria over the next week. (teach-nology.com)
  • Salt usually slows or stops the growth of bacteria and sometimes kills existing bacteria. (reference.com)
  • Nearly all animal life is dependent on bacteria for survival as only bacteria and some archaea possess the genes and enzymes necessary to synthesize vitamin B 12 , also known as cobalamin , and provide it through the food chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • These evolutionary domains are called Bacteria and Archaea . (wikipedia.org)
  • A recently proposed system classifies the Archaebacteria, or Archaea, and the Eubacteria, or Bacteria, as major groupings (sometimes called domains) above the kingdom level. (infoplease.com)
  • Bacteria and Archaea differ in important characteristics, such as the number of ribosomal proteins and the size and shape of the ribosomal S unit. (britannica.com)
  • It's something you might expect Chicken Little to say: bacteria and viruses are falling from the atmosphere. (inhabitat.com)
  • Viruses and bacteria often act as parasites, infecting a host, reproducing at its expense and causing disease and death. (scienceblogs.com)
  • While it would be impossible to scientifically verify it as of now, it is highly likely that much your DNA actually codes for the creation of bacteria and viruses that are essential for your very survival. (everything2.com)
  • Bartonella are bacteria that live inside cells that can infect humans and a wide range of other animals. (canlyme.com)
  • For their test case, they chose Enterococcus faecalis , bacteria that commonly infect root canals, living communally in layers called a biofilm. (popularmechanics.com)
  • Did you know that bacteria 'talked' with each other by using small molecules to coordinate their behavior and decide when it's a good time to infect you? (zdnet.com)
  • Disease-causing bacteria use this language to decide when to infect a person or other host. (zdnet.com)
  • The bacteria can also infect the blood, especially if someone has chronic liver disease or other medical problems that compromise their immune system. (medicinenet.com)
  • However in surface water it is normal to see total coliform bacteria, which simply indicate the presence of soil, sediment, or other sources of coliform. (google.com)
  • Bacteria recycle nutrients in the soil and aid the human digestive system. (factmonster.com)
  • Bacteria in the soil release nitrates, a usable form of the element nitrogen. (factmonster.com)
  • A growing interest in the function of the gut microbiome is shedding new light on the roles bacteria play in human health. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • Genetically engineered bacteria ward off obesity in mice, showing how the microbiome could be used treat chronic diseases in people. (technologyreview.com)
  • A host of new research shows antibiotic use can negatively impact a patient's microbiome, the collection of benign bacteria that live on the outer and inner surfaces of the human body, and partner with the body to benefit human health. (huffingtonpost.com)
  • Scientists at MIT and the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) have re-engineered E. Coli bacteria to. (inhabitat.com)
  • Whenever you hear about people getting sick from bacteria in drinking water, or from eating an undercooked hamburger, it is usually E. coli that is causing the illness. (google.com)
  • A single E. coli bacteria reproducing without any competition every 20 minutes would create a population in four days that outnumbers the (of course an estimated figure) number of quarks in the Universe. (everything2.com)
  • Image Caption: Low-temperature electron micrograph of a cluster of E. coli bacteria, magnified 10,000 times. (redorbit.com)
  • Cases of infections from a flesh-eating bacteria seem to be increasing in Australia. (inhabitat.com)
  • It's been called a ''flesh-eating'' bacteria -- is that true? (medicinenet.com)
  • While this is often referred to as '' flesh-eating bacteria ," Blackmore says, medical experts consider it a misnomer. (medicinenet.com)
  • Salmonella is a group of bacteria that can cause illness and even death in humans. (foodsafety.gov)
  • On the other hand, the population of the other major group of bacteria , Bacteroidetes, increased. (dictionary.com)
  • The prime example of that is lactic acid bacteria (LAB), also known as acidophilus. (newsweek.com)
  • However, not all lactic-acid bacteria is equally effective. (newsweek.com)
  • Of all the different types of LAB, one type has captured the attention of academics for the prodigious amounts of polysaccharides it produces: 1073R-1 lactic acid bacteria, or simply R-1. (newsweek.com)
  • Newser) - Antibiotic-resistant bacteria that are 'just about as bad as it gets,' as one study author puts it, are spreading quickly in the Southeast, with a fivefold increase in detected cases between 2008 and 2012, a new study warns. (newser.com)
  • Thus, the presence of a single type of virus reversed many of the defects caused by the lack of bacteria in germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice. (nature.com)
  • To better understand antibiotic resistance (AMR) in bacteria, agencies within USDA, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and other federal and state partners work collaboratively through the National Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring System (NARMS). (usda.gov)
  • The genetic determinants of antibiotic resistance are transmitted between bacteria through both vertical and horizontal transfer, with several genes capable of being inserted in an integron leading to the resistance of multiple antimicrobials. (news-medical.net)
  • Therapeutic strategies for the treatment of MRSA and other antimicrobial resistant bacteria include higher antibiotic dosage, combination treatment with non-conventional drugs and the development of new drugs. (news-medical.net)
  • The CDC says about 2 million Americans are infected with antibiotic-resistant bacteria every year, and 23,000 of these Americans die. (time.com)
  • In September, U.S. government agencies announced the establishment of the Presidential Advisory Council on Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria to focus on the growing public health problem. (time.com)
  • As part of their monitoring, the M.O. has discovered antibiotic resistant bacteria on the toilet seat on the ISS. (universetoday.com)
  • In most cases, resistant bacteria make it harder to treat infections in patients, and negatively impact entire communities should the resistant bacteria population spread--which is likely as antibiotic resistance spreads rapidly between bacteria . (huffingtonpost.com)
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has sent out a warning to hospitals about a new antibiotic-resistant bacteria, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae, or CRE. (cnn.com)
  • The study of bacteria is known as bacteriology , a branch of microbiology . (wikipedia.org)
  • Part of the Wastewater Microbiology series, Wastewater Bacteria eschews technical jargon to deliver a practical, how-to guide for wastewater plant operators and those seeking to_understand the biology and biological conditions at the treatment process. (worldcat.org)
  • The plasma flashlight that the scientists created produces a faint light, but enough plasma to be effective against bacteria. (popularmechanics.com)
  • Until recently, scientists held there existed only a few kinds of bacteria that used chemical energy to create their own food. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Some scientists assert that these unique bacteria should be classified in their own new taxonomic kingdom. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Watch: Scientists discover new plastic-eating bacteria and tested it to see how fast it would. (news24.com)
  • Scientists have created a "virtual bacteria" which mimics the way the organism works, in a breakthrough which could improve our understanding of disease and help find new treatments. (telegraph.co.uk)
  • British medical scientists say they have discovered how meningococcal bacteria break through the body's natural defense system to attack the brain. (redorbit.com)
  • Probiotics work by assisting in establishing healthy amounts of friendly bacteria, which compete with other bacteria that may exist in the GI tract. (prweb.com)
  • a , The intestine of normal mice harbours a diverse microbial population, including commensal bacteria that maintain tissue architecture and promote the development of lymphocytes (T and B cells), which produce antibodies and other immune-stimulatory molecules, thereby promoting host resistance to injury and to pathogenic bacteria. (nature.com)
  • The bacteria are non-pathogenic and approved by the United States Department of Agriculture for use around food. (csmonitor.com)
  • 6. Pathogenic bacteria -- pt. (worldcat.org)
  • When we think about bacteria polluting our rivers and lakes, it is usually fecal coliform bacteria. (google.com)
  • When large concentrations of fecal coliform bacteria are present in water, it indicates that the water is being contaminated by some source of manure or other waste. (google.com)
  • In Kansas, the biggest contributors of fecal coliform bacteria to rivers and lakes are livestock operations, especially those that have a large number of animals in a small, confined area. (google.com)
  • Rain water washes this manure into our rivers, streams and lakes, carrying with it fecal coliform bacteria. (google.com)
  • Other sources of fecal coliform bacteria include wildlife populations, and leaky septic systems that haven't been well-maintained. (google.com)
  • Fillmore officials are sampling again for evidence of coliform bacteria and if the test is positive a second time the boil water edict will be issued. (latimes.com)
  • Routine weekly sampling showed that three of four samples tested positive for coliform bacteria, which is associated with sewage contamination, Curphey said. (latimes.com)
  • In humans and most animals, the largest number of bacteria exist in the gut , and a large number on the skin . (wikipedia.org)
  • Even though bacteria have a bad reputation in our society, most types are completely harmless to humans, or even helpful! (google.com)
  • As far as I know, no humans are using mosquitoes as a food source, but it might be worthwhile to study the bacteria before we go wholesale with this idea, namely, to see if there's any discernible difference in the output of their excreta or other biological products, and if there are, if those changes would impact their involvement in the food chain. (scienceblogs.com)
  • There are plenty of chemicals that will kill bacteria, but many of them are toxic to humans as well. (extremetech.com)
  • Humans' relationship with bacteria is complex. (livescience.com)
  • البكتيريا أو الجُرْثُومَة أو الجُرْثُوم (Bacteria وباليونانية القديمة : bakterion عصيات) كائنات حية دقيقة وحيدة الخلية منها المكورات والعصيات و الحلزوني وهي تتجمع مع بعضها وتأخذ أشكالا متعددة مثل عقد أو سبحة فتسمى مكورات عقدية أو على شكل عنقود فتسمى (dbpedia.org)
  • In vulnerable patients with wound infections, the bacteria can create severe tissue damage and skin breakdown -- necrotizing fasciitis -- at the wound site," Blackmore says. (medicinenet.com)
  • Engineered bacteria can prevent, diagnose, and treat infections. (technologyreview.com)
  • Bacteria are vital in many stages of the nutrient cycle by recycling nutrients such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere . (wikipedia.org)
  • In the biological communities surrounding hydrothermal vents and cold seeps , extremophile bacteria provide the nutrients needed to sustain life by converting dissolved compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide and methane , to energy. (wikipedia.org)
  • From the oxygen we inhale to the nutrients our stomachs pull from food, we have bacteria to thank for thriving on this planet. (howstuffworks.com)
  • Moreover, the bacteria motors work using simple nutrients such as glucose and are naturally sensitive to their environment. (newscientist.com)
  • One possible conclusion is that the gut bacteria of the sick twin make it hard for the child to absorb the already limited nutrients and calories available in a meagre diet. (scientificamerican.com)
  • This photo provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows one form of CRE bacteria, sometimes called "nightmare bacteria. (newser.com)
  • Bacteria fall into one of two groups, Archaebacteria (ancient forms thought to have evolved separately from other bacteria) and Eubacteria. (infoplease.com)
  • If you're feeling crummy, it's probably because nasty bacteria or some other germs have gotten into your body and made you sick. (kidshealth.org)
  • M cells are able to transfer the metabolic products and/or dead bodies of gut bacteria into the body, along with various pathogens or germs, without changing their shape or characteristics. (newsweek.com)
  • Most people think bacteria are dangerous invisible "germs" that exist to make life miserable . (everything2.com)
  • A few bacteria reproduce by budding or by formation of conidia (asexual spores). (thecanadianencyclopedia.com)
  • Bacteria reproduce by fission or by forming spores . (dictionary.com)
  • A big part of the problem is that for part of their life cycle, the bacteria take the form of dormant, but very rugged, spores. (philly.com)
  • Pea and bean plants, such as soybeans, use bacteria called Rhizobium which convert nitrogen straight into amino acids. (factmonster.com)
  • Not only do "formerly bacteria, now organelles" occupy every nucleated cell on Earth, but true self-sufficient bacteria are required by all plant life to take nitrogen from the atmosphere and put it into the plant's vascular system. (everything2.com)
  • So basically, without bacteria there would be essentially zero oxygen in the atmosphere, and no way to create protein , which requires captured nitrogen to exist. (everything2.com)
  • Anammox bacteria grew on the surface of an electrode and converted ammonium to nitrogen gas. (eurekalert.org)
  • Nitrifying bacteria then convert this ammonium into nitrate, which can then be used by plants to create more proteins thus completing the nitrogen cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • The team says that its findings probably apply to many species of small bacteria, but more work will be needed to figure out whether - and how - the system works in bugs that are not spherical, such as rod-shaped cyanobacteria. (bbc.co.uk)
  • This artist's image shows spherical bacteria. (livescience.com)
  • One possible explanation for why only some malnourished children fall prey to kwashiorkor is that differences in gut bacteria might affect how susceptible people are. (scientificamerican.com)
  • bacteria were also much more susceptible to change -- some species flourished, while others died down, altering the overall composition of the population. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The good bacteria are good for us, and the bad bacteria can make us sick. (kidshealth.org)
  • BONUS: Since all mosquitoes need these 'good' bacteria, these GMO bacteria will work in any of the ~100 species of mosquitoes that can carry malaria. (scienceblogs.com)