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  • fats
  • What not to snack on Make sure to avoid all transfats (hydrogenated oils) and too much polyunsaturated fats found in oils such as corn, soy, canola, and safflower. (northdenvernews.com)
  • The food items that are major sources of saturated fats must be avoided. (blogspot.com)
  • concentrations
  • They also tested what happened when they were exposed to solutions with different concentrations of glucose in the lab. (www.nhs.uk)
  • They researchers tested the response of the patch to solutions with different concentrations of glucose in the lab. (www.nhs.uk)
  • plasma glucose
  • After correcting SUV for plasma glucose, SUV and Patlak responses became similar for study A, but large differences remained for study B. Further analysis revealed that differences in responses amongst methods in study B were primarily due to changes in the arterial input functions. (springer.com)
  • Potential discrepancies between SUV and full kinetic analysis results may be caused by changes in plasma glucose levels or differences in FDG plasma clearance among scans. (springer.com)
  • exercise
  • Subjects in the Chilean study were required to follow a high intensity exercise protocol that consisted of 1 minute of cycling at maximal intensity until muscle fatigue followed by 2 mins rest and repeated 10 times. (mrsupplement.com.au)
  • With a total exercise time of 90 minutes per week, subjects saw their blood glucose levels drop an average of 1.9 mmol/L two hours after a 75g oral glucose load. (mrsupplement.com.au)
  • The great thing about high intensity exercise is that it provides a myriad of other benefits. (mrsupplement.com.au)
  • For a more thorough discussion of the benefits of high intensity exercise, please see our article on High Intensity Interval Training . (mrsupplement.com.au)
  • Vigorous high-intensity exercise is not safe or suitable for everyone. (mercola.com)
  • Exercise is also important in achieving your ideal body weight and helps the body utilize glucose more efficiently. (netwellness.org)
  • readings
  • For my next installment on Resistant Starch , the following post documents an N=2 (two study subjects) collaboration to record blood glucose readings in different states of dieting, with and without RS. (freetheanimal.com)
  • intake
  • In the meantime, a diet rich in fruits and veggies (especially those rich in iron), taking multi-vitamins, avoiding coffee, alcohol and chocolate intake ("Oh no, not chocolate! (lankalibrary.com)
  • Try to reduce your intake of canned vegetables because they have higher salt content. (wikihow.com)
  • Eventually, because the cellular intake of glucose is deficient, the body perceives this as starvation. (thefreelibrary.com)
  • A large trial called the Age-Related Eye Disease Study found that a higher intake of antioxidants, zinc, and omega-3 fatty acids (the type found in fish) may decrease the risk of developing macular degeneration in those at high genetic risk. (everydayhealth.com)
  • glycemic
  • Rather use lots of berries which are very high in antioxidants and have a low glycemic index. (northdenvernews.com)
  • At that point, Tim and I started to collaborate, looking at a second possibility raised by the literature, that of "blunting" of the Blood Glucose (BG) rise by resistant starch when taken together or before a high-glycemic food. (freetheanimal.com)
  • 2. For RS/PS blunting effect when taken together with hi-glycemic food, there is clearly a blunting effect for both Tim and myself, while you can see from my additional results that the degree of that effect depends on the immediate diet history and the long-term use of RS. (freetheanimal.com)
  • The thought is that if you avoid these 'high glycemic' foods, blood glucose levels won't rise as high, making you releases less insulin, allowing you to store less fat. (mindandmuscle.net)
  • medications
  • The RD or CDE takes into account your lifestyle, your food preferences, whether you need to lose weight or lower your blood cholesterol or blood pressure, and any medications you're taking. (kraftrecipes.com)
  • Your blood glucose levels are affected by what and how much you eat, how physically active you are, what medications you take, and whether you're sick or under stress. (kraftrecipes.com)
  • injections
  • Other causes of malaria are from pregnant women to unborn child, through blood transfusions and by using sharing needles for blood tests or injections. (tarladalal.com)
  • food
  • When traveling with an insulin pump , bring extra supplies including extra reservoir cartridges, infusion sets, batteries, tapes and adhesives, emergency glucagon with a prescription, food and/or glucose tabs/gel, and insulin vials/pens and syringes in case your pump is not working properly. (endocrineweb.com)