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  • therapeutic
  • Therefore, we investigated their role during immune reconstitution and re-establishment of immune tolerance and their therapeutic potential following congenic bone marrow transplantation (BMT)inaproteoglycan-inducedarthritis (PGIA) mousemodel. (uu.nl)
  • Nevertheless, these cells are being investigated as the basis for a number of therapeutic applications, including possible treatments for diabetes and Parkinson's disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, there are two main principles by which cells facilitate therapeutic action: Stem cell or progenitor cell engraftment, differentiation, and long term replacement of damaged tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes cells that naturally secrete the relevant therapeutic factors, or which undergo epigenetic changes or genetic engineering that causes the cells to release large quantities of a specific molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is therefore highly hypothetical that cord blood cells kept for autologous use will be of any value in the future" and "the legitimacy of commercial cord blood banks for autologous use should be questioned as they sell a service which has presently no real use regarding therapeutic options. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancerous
  • Immunotherapy is a form of treatment in which a cancer patient's own immune system is manipulated to make it reject and destroy cancerous cells. (feistweiller.org)
  • In some individuals, the disease comes to light only after the cancerous cells overwhelm the bone marrow resulting in anemia producing tiredness or weakness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Multiple myeloma is diagnosed based on blood or urine tests finding abnormal antibodies, bone marrow biopsy finding cancerous plasma cells, and medical imaging finding bone lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • Radiation therapy (also called radiotherapy, X-ray therapy, or irradiation) is the use of ionizing radiation to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • The diagnosis of CLL is based on the demonstration of an abnormal population of B lymphocytes in the blood, bone marrow, or tissues that display an unusual but characteristic pattern of molecules on the cell surface. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a developing embryo, stem cells can differentiate into all the specialized cells-ectoderm, endoderm and mesoderm (see induced pluripotent stem cells)-but also maintain the normal turnover of regenerative organs, such as blood, skin, or intestinal tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stem cells can now be artificially grown and transformed (differentiated) into specialized cell types with characteristics consistent with cells of various tissues such as muscles or nerves. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates cord blood under the category of "Human Cells, Tissues, and Cellular and Tissue Based-Products. (wikipedia.org)
  • multiple myeloma
  • Multiple myeloma, also known as plasma cell myeloma, is a cancer of plasma cells, a type of white blood cell normally responsible for producing antibodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • A mnemonic sometimes used to remember some of the common symptoms of multiple myeloma is CRAB: C = calcium (elevated), R = renal failure, A = anemia, B = bone lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • CRAB symptoms and proliferation of monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow are part of the diagnostic criteria of multiple myeloma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the total immunoglobulin level is typically elevated in multiple myeloma, the majority of the antibodies are ineffective monoclonal antibodies from the clonal plasma cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • identical
  • We evaluated, after intensive anti-leukemic remission-induction chemotherapy, the impact of the availability of an HLA -identical sibling donor on an intention-to treat basis. (aamds.org)
  • In addition, all the CLL cells within one individual are clonal, that is, genetically identical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two mechanisms exist to ensure that a stem cell population is maintained: Obligatory asymmetric replication: a stem cell divides into one mother cell that is identical to the original stem cell, and another daughter cell that is differentiated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stochastic differentiation: when one stem cell develops into two differentiated daughter cells, another stem cell undergoes mitosis and produces two stem cells identical to the original. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 4 major units that perform Allogeneic - stem cells harvested from genetically similar but not identical donors - and Autologous - stem cells harvested from self- HCTs are found at the "EVANGELISMOS" Hospital in Athens, the "PAPANIKOLAOU" Hospital in Thessaloniki and the PATRAS UNIVERSITY GENERAL HOSPITAL in Rio-Patras and the "AGHIA SOPHIA" Children's Hospital in Athens. (wikipedia.org)
  • The transplantation may be autologous (an individual's own blood cells saved earlier), allogeneic (blood cells donated by someone else with matching HLA), or syngeneic (blood cells donated by an identical twin). (wikipedia.org)
  • pluripotent
  • In 2012, the Nobel Prize for Medicine was attributed conjointed to John B. Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka for the discovery that mature cells can be reprogrammed to become pluripotent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pluripotent stem cells are the descendants of totipotent cells and can differentiate into nearly all cells, i.e. cells derived from any of the three germ layers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The researchers were able to identify the minimal conditions and factors that would be sufficient for starting the cascade of molecular and cellular processes to instruct pluripotent cells to organize the embryo. (wikipedia.org)
  • organ
  • A single cancer cell that remains in the organ, however, can recur, or grow into a new tumor. (feistweiller.org)
  • Most surgeons endeavour to cut blood vessels as close as possible to the heart to leave room for trimming, especially if the donor heart is of a different size than the original organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most commonly used technique is orthotopic transplantation, in which the native liver is removed and the donor organ is placed in the same anatomic location as the original liver. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells then integrate into the site of injury, replacing damaged tissue, and thus facilitate improved function of the organ or tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • King Fahad Specialist Hospital - Dammam continues to work closely with the Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation (SCOT), the Eastern Province health authorities, and the other hospitals in the Kingdom. (wikipedia.org)
  • Organ Donor Mobile Team. (wikipedia.org)
  • aplastic anemia
  • Candidates for HSCTs include pediatric cases where the patient has an inborn defect such as severe combined immunodeficiency or congenital neutropenia with defective stem cells, and also children or adults with aplastic anemia who have lost their stem cells after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • Adipose tissue (lipid cells), which requires extraction by liposuction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiation therapy injures or destroys cells in the area being treated (the "target tissue") by damaging their genetic material, making it impossible for these cells to continue to grow and divide. (wikipedia.org)
  • The virus infection provokes an inflammatory response of paneth cells in the intestine, helping to spread the virus by causing tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The plasma cells can also form a mass in the bone marrow or soft tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • After injury, mature terminally differentiated kidney cells dedifferentiate into more primordial versions of themselves and then differentiate into the cell types needing replacement in the damaged tissue Macrophages can self-renew by local proliferation of mature differentiated cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • In newts, muscle tissue is regenerated from specialized muscle cells that dedifferentiate and forget the type of cell they had been. (wikipedia.org)
  • undergo
  • The policy of the American Academy of Pediatrics states that "private storage of cord blood as 'biological insurance' is unwise" unless there is a family member with a current or potential need to undergo a stem cell transplantation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diffuse Large B-
  • Grade 3 is further subdivided into: grade 3A (centrocytes still present) grade 3B (the follicles consist almost entirely of centroblasts) The WHO 2008 update classifies grades 1 and 2 now as low grade follicular lymphoma, grade 3A as high grade follicular lymphoma, and grade 3B as Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL). (wikipedia.org)
  • Differentiation
  • Understanding the potential of these cells and the molecular mechanisms underlying their differentiation should lead to innovative protocols for clinical applications. (semanticscholar.org)
  • This atypical molecular pattern includes the coexpression of cell surface markers clusters of differentiation 5 (CD5) and 23. (wikipedia.org)
  • In CLL, the lymphocytes are genetically clonal, of the B cell lineage (expressing marker molecules clusters of differentiation 19 and 20), and characteristically express the marker molecules CD5 and CD23. (wikipedia.org)
  • This meant that the cells can change their differentiation pathway. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Drosophila imaginal discs, cells have to choose from a limited number of standard discrete differentiation states. (wikipedia.org)
  • The fact that transdetermination (change of the path of differentiation) often occurs for a group of cells rather than single cells shows that it is induced rather than part of maturation. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • The donor may be blood-related or an eligible unrelated donor. (feistweiller.org)
  • CLL results in the build up of B cell lymphocytes in the bone marrow, lymph nodes, and blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • These cells do not function well and crowd out healthy blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most people are diagnosed without symptoms as the result of a routine blood test that shows a high white blood cell count. (wikipedia.org)
  • CLL is usually first suspected by a diagnosis of lymphocytosis, an increase in a type of white blood cell, on a complete blood count test. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pilot studies of autologous stem cell transplantation using peripheral blood have demonstrated rapid engraftment with this technique. (medscape.com)
  • However, because of higher number of T cells infused in cases of peripheral blood as a source, the incidence of chronic GVHD is higher. (medscape.com)
  • The eligibility criteria for a stem cell donor are essentially the same as for blood donation. (medscape.com)
  • The reduction in CD11b+ macrophages and IFN-γ-producing T cells was due to reduced proliferative expansion and not to enhanced apoptosis or to altered distribution of these cells between spleen, blood, and the lymphatic system. (jci.org)
  • Hemoglobin is a protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen to vital organs such as the brain, heart, lungs and kidneys. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Thalassemia major is a hereditary anemia characterized by little or no ß-globin production, which results in hemolysis (breakdown or destruction of red blood cells) due to the formation of unstable alpha-globin tetramers and ineffective erythropoiesis which is uniformly fatal in the absence of regular transfusions. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Although it is most frequently performed with hematopoietic stem cells (precursors of blood-forming cells) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, cardiac cells have also been used successfully to repair damage caused by heart attacks[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • By definition, autologous cells are obtained from one's own body, just as one may bank his or her own blood for elective surgical procedures. (wikipedia.org)
  • This demonstrates that the cells can produce new blood cells over a long term. (wikipedia.org)
  • This allows the bone marrow to recover, proliferate and continue producing healthy blood cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF) are naturally occurring glycoproteins that stimulate white blood cell proliferation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early studies used simple models and only considered the cell-free spreading of HIV, in which virus particles bud from an infected T cell, enter the blood/extracellular fluid, and then infect another T cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • The breakdown of bone also leads to the release of calcium into the blood, leading to hypercalcemia and its associated symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myeloma cells produce monoclonal proteins of varying types, most commonly immunoglobulins (antibodies) and free light chains, resulting in abnormally high levels of these proteins in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • CDA is one of many types of anemia, characterized by ineffective erythropoiesis, and resulting from a decrease in the number of red blood cells (RBCs) in the body and a less than normal quantity of hemoglobin in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists also encourage public cord banking and discourage private cord blood banking. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cord blood stem cells are blood cell progenitors which can form red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is why cord blood cells are currently used to treat blood and immune system related genetic diseases, cancers, and blood disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • An adequate cord blood collection requires at least 75mL in order to ensure that there will be enough cells to be used for a transplantation. (wikipedia.org)