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  • enzyme
  • Aspirin acts as an acetylating agent where an acetyl group is covalently attached to a serine residue in the active site of the COX enzyme. (wikipedia.org)
  • Allergy
  • Contrary to what your folks usually think, and from what you may have heard while growing up, aspirin sensitivity is not an allergy. (findmedicare.pw)
  • Take note that according to a modern study in the medicine discipline, nine out of ten, or 90%, of people who are diagnosed or described as aspirin sensitive are at the same time sensitive or manifest adverse reaction to allergy-causing drugs, foods and inhalants. (findmedicare.pw)
  • nausea
  • During some episodes, the visual loss may occur with no headache and at other times throbbing headache on the same side of the head as the visual loss may occur, accompanied by severe light sensitivity and/or nausea. (wikipedia.org)
  • widely
  • Because aspirin is so widely used today, it is somehow surprising that the drug produces sensitivity to certain people. (findmedicare.pw)
  • Heinrich Dreser's explanation, widely accepted since the drug was first brought to market, was that aspirin relieved pain by acting on the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • salicylic acid
  • Due to sun sensitivity, sun protection is recommended when using salicylic acid on sun-exposed skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risks of aspirin late in pregnancy are probably not relevant for a topical exposure to salicylic acid, even late in the pregnancy, because of its low systemic levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • Salicylic acid was one of the original starting materials for making acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) in 1897. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is poorly soluble in water (2 g/L at 20 °C). Aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid or ASA) can be prepared by the esterification of the phenolic hydroxyl group of salicylic acid with the acetyl group from acetic anhydride or acetyl chloride. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acidification of the product with sulfuric acid gives salicylic acid: It can also be prepared by the hydrolysis of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) or methyl salicylate (oil of wintergreen) with a strong acid or base. (wikipedia.org)
  • migraine
  • Treatment depends on identifying behavior that triggers migraine such as stress, sleep deprivation, skipped meals, food sensitivities, or specific activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Aspirin is one of the most common over-the-counter drug that is taken by people with mild fever, body aches and other mild ailments. (findmedicare.pw)
  • overdose
  • Aspirin overdose has potentially serious consequences, sometimes leading to significant morbidity and death. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common cause of death following an aspirin overdose is cardiopulmonary arrest usually due to pulmonary edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Aspirin causes several different effects in the body, mainly the reduction of inflammation, analgesia (relief of pain), the prevention of clotting, and the reduction of fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • He found that cutting the guinea pigs' vagus nerve did not affect the action of bradykinin or the inhibitory effect of aspirin-evidence that aspirin worked locally to combat pain and inflammation, rather than on the central nervous system. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fever
  • In those ancient civilizations, aspirin was in the form of a white willow bark that was then used to treat fever and pain. (findmedicare.pw)
  • However
  • However, other effects of aspirin, such as uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, and the modulation of signaling through NF-κB, are also being investigated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe
  • The most severe response is exercise/aspirin induced anaphylaxis attributed to one omega gliadin that is a relative of the protein that causes celiac disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • pain
  • Experts are divided regarding use for non-cancer-related chronic pain, as most opioids have great potential for dependence and have also been alleged to create paradoxical pain sensitivity. (wikipedia.org)