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  • 19th century
  • Since the 19th century, artificial beings are common in fiction, as in Mary Shelley's Frankenstein or Karel Čapek's R.U.R. (Rossum's Universal Robots). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 19th century in Greece, many upper-class women wore empty pistachio shells over their nails, slowly spreading the artificial nail trend across Europe. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the early 19th century, the term artificial fly was being routinely used in angling literature much like this representative quote from Thomas Best's A Concise Treatise on the Art of Angling (1807) to refer to all types of flies used by fly fishers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The art of artificial fly-fishing, certainly has the pre-eminence over the other various methods that are used to take fishes in the art of angling Although the term fly was a reference to an imitation of some flying insect, by the mid-19th century the term fly was being applied to a far greater range of imitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • ethics
  • This raises philosophical arguments about the nature of the mind and the ethics of creating artificial beings endowed with human-like intelligence, issues which have been explored by myth, fiction and philosophy since antiquity. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Artificial kidney is often a synonym for hemodialysis, but may also, more generally, refer to renal replacement therapies (with exclusion of kidney transplantation) that are in use and/or in development. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are thousands of artificial fly patterns, many of them with descriptive and often idiosyncratic names. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • The burgeoning activity in this field has led to conferences dedicated solely to Artificial Ants, and to numerous commercial applications by specialized companies such as AntOptima. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial turf was first used in Major League Baseball in the Houston Astrodome in 1966, replacing the grass field used when the stadium opened a year earlier. (wikipedia.org)
  • term
  • this term since then became a generic trademark for any artificial turf throughout the late 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Probably the first use of the term Artificial fly came in Izaac Walton's The Compleat Angler (1653), Oh my good Master, this morning walk has been spent to my great pleasure and wonder: but I pray, when shall I have your direction how to make Artificial flyes, like to those that the Trout loves best? (wikipedia.org)
  • create
  • Research at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has resulted in a metal-ceramic composite that has, like bone, a fine microstructure, and which may help create artificial bone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial scarcity describes the scarcity of items even though either the technology and production, or sharing capacity exists to create a theoretically limitless abundance, as well as the use of laws to create scarcity where otherwise there wouldn't be. (wikipedia.org)
  • An economic liberal argument against artificial scarcity is that, in the absence of artificial scarcity, businesses and individuals would create tools based on their own need (demand). (wikipedia.org)
  • team
  • David Chany - who moved to Raleigh, North Carolina, in 1960 and later served as Dean of the North Carolina State University College of Textiles - headed the team of Research Triangle Park researchers who created the first notable artificial turf. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Chicago White Sox became the first team to install artificial turf in an outdoor stadium, as they used it in the infield and adjacent foul territory at Comiskey Park from 1969 through 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • patent
  • Patent The Agricultural Adjustment Act Hoarding, including cornering the market Deliberate destruction Paywalls Economic liberals argue that mechanisms that cause artificial scarcity are favourable to society as a whole since they encourage creativity. (wikipedia.org)
  • after a set number of years enjoying an artificial scarcity, the patent wears off and cheap generic versions of a product enter the market. (wikipedia.org)
  • forms
  • When you get acrylic nails, forms are fitted over the nail and then an artificial nail is sculpted out of the acrylic, then properly shaped and buffed to a shine. (wikipedia.org)
  • Artificial tears are supplemented with other treatments in moderate to severe forms of dry eyes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some classical liberals and libertarians oppose artificial scarcity, on the grounds that their lack of physical scarcity means they are not subject to the same rationale behind material forms of private property, and that most instances of artificial scarcity, such as intellectual property, are creations of the state that limit the rights of the individual. (wikipedia.org)
  • appearance
  • Some artificial nails attempt to mimic the appearance of real fingernails as closely as possible, while other designs may deliberately stray in appearance from real fingernails. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acrylic nail powders are available in a variety of colors and can use "special effects" such as contours, sparkles and the very popular French manicure (pink or tan and white appearance) Artificial nails can be shaped, cut, and formed in many different ways that include square, squared oval/squoval, rounded, almond, ballerina/coffin, or stiletto. (wikipedia.org)
  • book
  • Artificial reality is a book series by Myron W. Krueger about interactive immersive environments (or virtual realities), based on video recognition techniques, that put a user in full, unencumbered contact with the digital world. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2017, a book chapter entitled "Artificial Enzymes: The Next Wave" was published. (wikipedia.org)
  • A book entitled "Nanozymes: Next Wave of Artificial Enzymes" was published. (wikipedia.org)
  • play
  • Teams who chose to play on artificial surfaces outdoors did so because of the reduced maintenance cost, especially in colder climates with urban multi-purpose "cookie cutter" stadiums such as Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium, Pittsburgh's Three Rivers Stadium and Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Artificial Passenger will try to read jokes, play games, ask questions or read interactive books to stimulate the driver. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • Hundreds of artificial flower factories in the Pearl River delta area of Guangdong province in China have been built since the early 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to a limited supply of the new artificial grass, only the infield was installed before the Houston Astros' home opener in April 1966, the outfield was installed in early summer during an extended Astros road trip and first used after the All-Star Break in July. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first successful artificial kidney was developed by Willem Kolff in the Netherlands during the early 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social
  • Social liberals, socialists, and anarchists argue that artificial scarcity is beneficial for the owner, but unfavourable towards the consumer, as it enables the owner to capitalise off ideas and products that are otherwise not property in the physical sense. (wikipedia.org)
  • device
  • An artificial vagina is a device designed to imitate the female sex organ. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Artificial Passenger is a telematic device, developed by IBM, that interacts verbally with a driver to reduce the likelihood of them falling asleep at the controls of a vehicle. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • Artificial turf does have its downside, however: limited life, periodic cleaning requirements, petroleum use, toxic chemicals from infill, and heightened health and safety concerns. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the overall side-effect profile of artificial tears is very low. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • The Artificial Passenger may also be integrated with wireless services to provide weather and road information, driving directions, and other such notifications systems. (wikipedia.org)