• This observational study aims to identify and distinguish two different types of progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS), a disorder associated with neurodegenerative disease and dementia, through clinical imaging and testing of adults with PAOS. (nih.gov)
  • Researchers have identified different characteristics in the speech patterns among people with progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS) and characterized two types, phonetic and prosodic, which may be associated with progression of neurodegenerative disease. (nih.gov)
  • The purpose of this study is to identify and distinguish two different types of Progressive Apraxia of Speech through clinical imaging and testing. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • For the past decade the investigators have been studying patients with primary progressive apraxia of speech (PAOS). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Progressive apraxia of Speech (PAoS) is a progressive motor speech disorder associated with neurodegenerative disease causing impairment of phonetic encoding and motor speech planning. (epfl.ch)
  • This notion is supported by the presence of double dissociation-there are aphasic patients without apraxia and apraxic patients with normal language comprehension and production. (jscimedcentral.com)
  • Individuals with Huntington's disease were evaluated prospectively for the presence of apraxia, and aspects of motor and cognitive function were correlated with apraxic errors. (elsevier.com)
  • Use of the term apraxia of speech implies a shared core of speech and prosody features, regardless of time of onset, whether congenital or acquired, or specific etiology. (asha.org)
  • The term apraxia was first created by Steinthal in 1871 and was then applied by Gogol, Kusmaul, Star, and Pick to patients who failed to pantomime the use of tools. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term apraxia is derived from the Greek word praxis , which refers to producing an action or movement. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Liepmann popularized the diagnostic term "apraxia" to differentiate individuals with these types of select motor difficulties from those who struggle with movement disturbances because of weakness, paralysis, and incoordination of the muscles involved. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In particular, a short screening test for apraxia, and a more comprehensive diagnostic apraxia test for clinical use are recommended. (springer.com)
  • Ideo-motor apraxia is characterized by derailments of bodily movement patterns, due to disturbances in the motor planning stages of a well-conceived behavioral act. (encyclopedia.com)
  • By the definition of apraxia , AOS affects volitional (willful or purposeful) movement patterns, however AOS usually also affects automatic speech . (wikipedia.org)
  • Apraxia by definition cannot be the product of primary motor deficits, weakness, sensory loss, or lack of comprehension, therefore the second objective of the study was to detect apraxia while remaining true to these prerequisites. (uwaterloo.ca)
  • Although currently only a few randomized controlled studies investigate the efficacy of different apraxia treatments, the gesture training suggested by Smania and colleagues can be recommended for the therapy of apraxia, the effects of which were shown to extend to activities of daily living and to persist for at least 2 months after completion of the training. (springer.com)
  • Results and discussion Validation of the 12-item AST with the TULIA showed a remarkable diagnostic reliability with high specificity, sensitivity and positive predictive value, for the presence and severity of apraxia. (bmj.com)
  • Typically, patients with apraxia can't perform a particular movement at the request of the examiner, but they might still be able to do it as an automatic or unconcious action if they are provided with sufficient cues, such as might be obtained by using the actual objects or by seeing the examiner performing the movement. (bio.net)
  • Therefore, patients with apraxia are unlikely to perform activities of daily living well. (medscape.com)
  • Patients with apraxia perform poorly when demonstrating how an object is used, particularly when pantomiming the action. (frontiersin.org)
  • Patients with apraxia performed normally on the neutral control condition when grasping the evenly weighted version. (frontiersin.org)
  • Some patients with Apraxia may even become mute. (aansneurosurgeon.org)
  • Patients with apraxia find that vowels are easier to produce than consonants. (omicsgroup.org)
  • Patients with apraxia suffer from diminished motor planning and function, which can manifest in a variety of ways. (docshop.com)
  • Most of us have witnessed the groping behaviors during the motor programming efforts of individuals with apraxia. (speechpathology.com)
  • Primary objective: Electromagnetic articulography was employed to investigate the strength of articulatory coupling and hence the degree of functional movement independence between individual articulators in apraxia of speech (AOS). (unl.edu)