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  • supracristal
  • The supracristal or conal defects affect the development of the conal septum and are located below the anteriormost portion of the right coronary cusp, and also include some forms of outlet septum defects. (revespcardiol.org)
  • The cases that most frequently cause deterioration of the aortic cusps are the supracristal defects, whereas the aortic valve is involved only in larger infracristal defects and after a long evolution. (revespcardiol.org)
  • This type of defect includes an anatomic variant that can be difficult to identify without precise echocardiographic studies, in which a supracristal defect coexists with a small muscular ridge between the aortic and pulmonic cusps (actually intraconal defects) to which the aortic ring would be attached, making the aortic incompetence less significant. (revespcardiol.org)
  • cusp
  • The infracristal defects are located immediately below the conal septum and affect the outermost third of the right coronary semilunar cusp, the commissure, or the non-coronary cusp. (revespcardiol.org)
  • The defect in the infundibular septum is not usually very large and the mechanism of development of aortic incompetence proposed would be a lack of support of the semilunar cusp related with the defect, resulting in a gradual prolapse through the defect, which appears in the right ventricular infundibulum. (revespcardiol.org)
  • Further diagnostic workup by cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) unambiguously illustrated the asymmetric geometry of the ectatic aortic cusp and root causing compression of the right heart and of the right ventricular (RV) outflow tract. (hindawi.com)
  • dissection
  • 1 In addition, other sequelae related to chronic hypertension, such as coronary artery disease, stroke and aortic dissection can also develop. (appliedradiology.com)
  • Publications] Ishikawa, S et al: 'Three-channeled aortic dissection' Ann Thorac Surg. (nii.ac.jp)
  • transposition
  • Less common defects in the association are truncus arteriosus and transposition of the great arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a d-transposition occurs, the blood pathway is impaired because the two arteries are connecting to the wrong chambers in the heart. (goredforwomen.org)
  • Ventricle
  • In other words, functionally univentricular heart is a condition in which, after surgery, only one ventricle sustain systemic circulation. (frontiersin.org)
  • Double inlet left ventricle may be rarely associated with VA concordance (Holmes heart). (frontiersin.org)
  • graft
  • At the first operation, at the age of 7 years, continuity of the aortic arch was achieved by insertion of a Teflon graft, employing left heart bypass. (bmj.com)
  • The patient was subsequently scheduled for aortocoronary bypass graft surgery and aortic root and valve replacement. (hindawi.com)
  • echocardiography
  • Furthermore, an ectasia of the aortic bulb was observed in the apical view (Figure 1 (c)), which was confirmed by transesophageal echocardiography (TEE, Figure 1 (d), aortic root diameter of 65 mm). (hindawi.com)
  • occurs
  • The patient with a prosthetic aortic valve who presents with infective endocarditis and an extensive annular abscess should undergo surgery before massive dehiscence occurs. (aafp.org)
  • Conversely, if a bacteremia occurs, normal undamaged heart endothelium is not conducive to bacterial colonization. (aafp.org)
  • obstruction
  • The most common forms of them are the ones that have a defect in one of the walls separating the chambers of the heart, or obstruction to one valve or artery. (infobarrel.com)
  • Coarctation in the adult is characterized by a short segment abrupt obstruction in the postductal region secondary to localized thickening of the aortic media. (bcm.edu)
  • If restrictive, an aortic arch obstruction may be present. (frontiersin.org)
  • Diagnosis
  • al Zaghal AM, Li J, Anderson RH, Lincoln C, Shore D, Rigby ML (1997) Anatomical criteria for the diagnosis of sinus venosus defects. (springer.com)
  • Recent progress in diagnosis and treatment (surgery and heart catheterization) makes it possible to fix most defects, even those once thought to be hopeless. (goredforwomen.org)
  • As diagnosis and treatment continue to advance, scientists will develop better treatments for these and other defects. (goredforwomen.org)
  • While approaching the diagnosis of any CHD, you should consider the heart as a three floor building. (frontiersin.org)
  • Causes
  • Introduction to and Causes of Heart Defects. (indigo.ca)
  • The leading causes of death included: heart failure (25 percent), ruptured aorta (21 percent), bacterial endocarditis (18 percent), and intracranial hemorrhage (12 percent). (appliedradiology.com)
  • This malformation of the heart causes a reversal in the normal blood flow pattern because the right and left lower chambers of the heart are reversed. (goredforwomen.org)
  • thoracic
  • Your veterinarian will also take X-rays of both the thoracic and abdominal regions to see if there are any abnormal masses, tumor, foreign body, and/or abnormal heart position. (petmd.com)
  • muscular
  • Postductal coarctation is most likely the result of the extension of a muscular artery (ductus arteriosus) into an elastic artery (aorta) during fetal life, where the contraction and fibrosis of the ductus arteriosus upon birth subsequently narrows the aortic lumen. (wikipedia.org)
  • ductus
  • Coarctation of the aorta (CoA or CoAo), also called aortic narrowing, is a congenital condition whereby the aorta is narrow, usually in the area where the ductus arteriosus (ligamentum arteriosum after regression) inserts. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Play media There are three types of aortic coarctations: Preductal coarctation: The narrowing is proximal to the ductus arteriosus. (wikipedia.org)