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  • fears
  • Throughout childhood, fears and anxieties are common occurrences and are generally considered to be a component of normal development (Miller, Bar rett, & Hampe, 1974). (springer.com)
  • The individual fears that he or she will act in a way (or show anxiety symptoms) that will be embarrassing and humiliating. (nih.gov)
  • patient's
  • The seven-question GAD-7 and remarkably even the two-question "ultra brief" version gives the physician a tool to quantify the patient's symptoms - sort of a lab test for anxiety," he said. (psychcentral.com)
  • The scale uses a normative system of scoring as shown below - [bullet points of answer options and points assigned] - with question at the end qualitatively describing severity of the patient's anxiety over the past 2 weeks. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ICD-10, which is the European equivalent of DSMIV-TR, describes the anxiety that typifies GAD as "free-floating," which means that it can attach itself to a wide number of issues or concerns in the patient's environment. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The disorder typically becomes worse during stressful periods in the patient's life. (encyclopedia.com)
  • develops
  • The disorder develops gradually and can begin at any point in the life cycle but usually develops between childhood and middle age. (psychologytoday.com)
  • It is important to diagnose and treat an anxiety disorder that develops or worsens during the college years to help prevent the problem from becoming chronic and continuing into later life. (villanova.edu)
  • mental disorders
  • Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV) criteria were used to determine impairment. (nih.gov)
  • DSM-IV mental disorders were assessed using a modified version of the fully structured World Health Organization Composite International Diagnostic Interview (WMH-CIDI), a fully structured lay-administered diagnostic interview that generates both International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision, and DSM-IV diagnoses. (nih.gov)
  • Anxiety disorders are among the most prevalent mental disorders and often people have more than one type of anxiety disorder. (queensu.ca)
  • person's
  • They all have one thing in common, though: Anxiety occurs too often, is too strong, is out of proportion to the present situation, and affects a person's daily life and happiness. (kidshealth.org)
  • worry
  • Anxiety mainly relates to worry about what might happen - worrying about things going wrong or feeling like you're in some kind of danger. (kidshealth.org)
  • With this common anxiety disorder, children worry excessively about many things, such as school, the health or safety of family members, or the future in general. (kidshealth.org)
  • They worry that actions or behaviors associated with their anxiety will be negatively evaluated by others, leading them to feel embarrassed. (nih.gov)
  • Generalized anxiety disorder, or GAD, is a disorder characterized by diffuse and chronic worry. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) experience extreme worry that can interfere with sleep and is usually accompanied by body symptoms ranging from tiredness to headaches to nausea. (psychologytoday.com)
  • Generalized anxiety disorder is characterized by exagerrated worry or tension and chronic anxiety, even when there is no event to cause it. (healthcentral.com)
  • often
  • Sometimes anxiety pre-existed alcohol or benzodiazepine dependence, but the dependence was acting to keep the anxiety disorders going and often progressively making them worse. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anxiety often manifests as a physical symptom like pain, fatigue, or inability to sleep , so it is not surprising that one out of five patients who come to a doctor's office with a physical complaint have anxiety," said Dr. Kroenke, I.U. School of Medicine professor of medicine and Regenstrief Institute, Inc. research scientist. (psychcentral.com)
  • Despite the high prevalence rates of these anxiety disorders, they often are underrecognized and undertreated clinical problems. (medscape.com)
  • 2 Panic attacks often begin in late adolescence or early adulthood, 2 but not everyone who experiences panic attacks will develop panic disorder. (athealth.com)
  • Because many anxiety drugs have side effects that can make you dependent on them, it's often best to see them as a second choice. (besthealthmag.ca)
  • In addition, the discomfort or complications associated with arthritis, diabetes, and other chronic disorders are often intensified by GAD. (encyclopedia.com)
  • People who suffer from panic disorder often believe they are having a heart attack, going crazy, or in mortal danger. (healthcentral.com)
  • sensations
  • When the body and mind react to danger or threat, a person feels physical sensations of anxiety - things like a faster heartbeat and breathing, tense muscles, sweaty palms, a queasy stomach, and trembling hands or legs. (kidshealth.org)
  • They may complain of other body sensations that go with anxiety too. (kidshealth.org)
  • reaction
  • Anxiety is a natural human reaction, and it serves an important biological function: It's an alarm system that's activated whenever we perceive danger or a threat. (kidshealth.org)
  • Anxiety is a natural human reaction that involves mind and body. (kidshealth.org)
  • By remaining present in the body, they learn that the anxiety they experience is merely a reaction to perceived threats. (psychcentral.com)
  • compulsions
  • For a person with OCD, anxiety takes the form of obsessions (excessively preoccupying thoughts) and compulsions (repetitive actions to try to relieve anxiety). (kidshealth.org)
  • The compulsions of OCD are characterized by the urgent need to do something to prevent or get rid of the anxiety associated with the obsessive thoughts. (villanova.edu)
  • diagnosis of anxiety
  • A study published in the 'Journal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology' explores diagnosis of anxiety in pre-schoolers using structured interviews. (psychcentral.com)
  • The authors, led by Lea Dougherty from University of Maryland College Park, looked at whether there was an anxiety disorder or not and then they looked at what other thinks might be linked to there being a diagnosis of anxiety. (psychcentral.com)