• These edicts included the provision of medical treatment for animals and bans on animal sacrifice, the castration of roosters, and hunting of many species. (wikipedia.org)
  • In both moral philosophy and ordinary language (as concerns humans), the term "welfare" is roughly synonymous with "wellbeing. (vin.com)
  • When we talk about human wellbeing, we are talking about what makes our lives go well for us - our quality of life - and it is hard to say that something advances or detracts from our welfare when it never touches what we experience. (vin.com)
  • The ethical analysis of our moral obligations to animals, as well as practical decisions regarding many issues in veterinary medicine, both presuppose some account of "animal welfare" - that is, of what makes an animal's life go well or poorly. (vin.com)
  • There is a second sense of the term often used in veterinary medicine, where "animal welfare" means a normative ethical position regarding our obligations, often contrasted with "animal rights. (vin.com)
  • While it is often claimed in veterinary medicine that animal welfare is a "science-based" concept, this is not strictly speaking true. (vin.com)
  • The Indian branches of the Humanitarian League, an English organization which opposed vivisection and the mistreatment and killing of animals, focused on vegetarianism and cow protection while ignoring vivisection. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are at least a few reasons why welfare is often thought to be "science-based. (vin.com)
  • One important point, often obscured by science-based views of welfare, is that any plausible definition of welfare will likely have to refer to what an animal subjectively experiences. (vin.com)
  • In Hinduism, killing an animal is regarded as a violation of ahimsa and causes bad karma, leading many Hindus to practice vegetarianism. (wikipedia.org)
  • Buddhism teaches vegetarianism (though not as strictly as Jainism), and many Buddhists practice life release in which animals destined for slaughter are purchased and released to the wild. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal welfare and rights in India regards the treatment of and laws concerning non-human animals in India. (wikipedia.org)
  • India is home to several religious traditions advocating non-violence and compassion towards animals, and has passed a number of animal welfare reforms since 1960. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2014 India became the first country in Asia to ban all testing of cosmetics on animals and the import of cosmetics tested on animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • Animal experimentation in India in the 1860s when Britain began introducing new drugs to the colony. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cow protectionists did not in general oppose (and often supported) animal experimentation, and the antivivisectionist groups established in India in the late 1890s died out due to lack of interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • A 2006 amendment specifies that experimenters must first try to use animals "lowest on the phylogenetic scale", use the minimum number of animals for 95% statistical confidence, and justify not using non-animal alternatives. (wikipedia.org)
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