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  • intubation
  • For the purpose of this topic, the difficult airway is defined as the situation in which the anesthesia clinician experiences difficulty with ventilation by mask or supraglottic airway (SGA), difficulty with endotracheal intubation, or both. (uptodate.com)
  • Smiths Medical produces breathing devices and intubation systems to assist anesthesia delivery, vital signs monitors to detect and regulate the effects of anesthesia, and warming systems to regulate body temperature for anesthetized patients to promote positive outcomes. (smiths-medical.com)
  • anesthetics
  • And if this explanation holds true, it could lead to anesthetics with fewer side effects and better drugs for bringing patients back up out of anesthesia-induced sleep. (scientificamerican.com)
  • As general anesthetics begin to wear off, many patients experience confusion or disorientation or have trouble thinking clearly. (wisegeek.com)
  • 2013. Inhalation anesthetics and the reproductive risk associated with occupational exposure among women working in veterinary anesthesia. (mothertobaby.org)
  • emergence
  • Recovery or emergence phase-The doctor will slowly reverse the anesthesia. (denverhealth.org)
  • The rapid emergence to full orientation in very elderly patient who had been anesthetized by xenon shows concordance to the high BIS values and the clinical signs of the depth of anesthesia. (hindawi.com)
  • https
  • MotherToBaby also has a fact sheet with general tips on working safely while pregnant, which can be found at https://mothertobaby.org/fact-sheets/reproductive-hazards-workplace/pdf/ . (mothertobaby.org)
  • Surgeons
  • Even healthy individuals can experience serious side effects, especially if they don't provide their surgeons with accurate information or are allergic to the anesthesia. (wisegeek.com)
  • works
  • This steady correlation seen across the four tanks only further confirms the idea that anesthesia works its magic by expanding protein volume in the brain. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Despite being a well-established component of modern medicine, much of how anesthesia works is a mystery. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Most recently research has suggested that in addition to targeting specific areas involved in sleep and arousal general anesthesia works by knocking out the neural networks that enable communication between brain regions. (scientificamerican.com)
  • control
  • General anesthesia suppresses many of your body's normal automatic functions, such as those that control breathing, heartbeat, circulation of the blood (such as blood pressure), movements of the digestive system, and throat reflexes such as swallowing, coughing, or gagging that prevent foreign material from being inhaled into your lungs (aspiration). (healthlinkbc.ca)
  • causes
  • Whether anesthesia causes neurological injury in patients under these conditions remains to be established. (upi.com)
  • brain
  • At the cellular level, Lioudyno has found that anesthesia can set off a chemical cascade triggering the release of microglia, immune cells normally deployed to fight infections in the brain. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Recent research on animals has also shown that anesthesia can induce brain changes like those thought to underlie dementia. (scientificamerican.com)