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  • Approach
  • The analytical approach is founded on the premise that proper explanations detail the "cogs and wheels" through which social outcomes are brought about, and it is driven by a commitment to realism. (wikipedia.org)
  • The work of James Coleman, Jon Elster, Robert Merton, Thomas Schelling and Raymond Boudon was of pivotal importance for the development of the analytical approach. (wikipedia.org)
  • Social Mechanisms: An Analytical Approach to Social Theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analytical Marxism is an approach to Marxist theory that was prominent amongst English-speaking philosophers and social scientists during the 1980s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two scholars continued their work on personality development independently: Jung's approach is called Analytical Psychology (German: analytische Psychologie), and Freud's approach is referred to as the Psychoanalytic School (psychoanalytische Schule), which he founded. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analytical phonics refers to an approach to the teaching of reading in which the phonemes associated with particular graphemes are not pronounced in isolation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In contrast, analytical phonics, also known as the "whole word" approach, involves analysis of whole words to detect phonetic or orthographic (spelling) patterns, then splitting them into smaller parts to help with decoding. (wikipedia.org)
  • particles
  • By contrast, analytical mechanics uses scalar properties of motion representing the system as a whole-usually its total kinetic energy and potential energy-not Newton's vectorial forces of individual particles. (wikipedia.org)
  • A Treatise on the Analytical Dynamics of Particles and Rigid Bodies: With an Introduction to the Problem of Three Bodies (Fourth edition of 1936 with foreword by Sir William McCrea ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • Starting in approximately the 1970s into the present day analytical chemistry has progressively become more inclusive of biological questions (bioanalytical chemistry), whereas it had previously been largely focused on inorganic or small organic molecules . (wikipedia.org)
  • Again, conjugating biomolecules with small probe molecules can pave the way for various biochemical analytical tests, which are less cumbersome and much faster than traditional testing techniques. (news-medical.net)
  • numerical
  • For example, to compute the solution of an ordinary differential equation for different values of its parametric inputs, it is often faster, more accurate, and more convenient to evaluate an analytical solution than to perform numerical integration . (mathworks.com)
  • involves
  • According to Haldane, "analytical Thomism involves the bringing into mutual relationship of the styles and preoccupations of recent English-speaking philosophy and the ideas and concerns shared by St Thomas and his followers" (Haldane 2004, xii). (wikipedia.org)
  • equivalent
  • Algorithms and models expressed with analytical solutions are often more efficient than equivalent numeric implementations . (mathworks.com)
  • Competition run by the RSC's Analytical Division for first year sixth form students or equivalent. (rsc.org)
  • In physics and applied mathematics, analytical regularization is a technique used to convert boundary value problems which can be written as Fredholm integral equations of the first kind involving singular operators into equivalent Fredholm integral equations of the second kind. (wikipedia.org)
  • promotes
  • Analytical Thomism is a philosophical movement which promotes the interchange of ideas between the thought of Saint Thomas Aquinas (including the philosophy carried on in relation to his thinking, called 'Thomism'), and modern analytic philosophy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Techniques
  • The impact factor of the journals and the significance of research findings in Analytical and Bioanalytical Techniques are in turn associated with the number of citations and references taken from the journals. (omicsonline.org)
  • The open access journal of Analytical and Bioanalytical Techniques undergoes a peer-review process for individual manuscripts submitted by respective research authors. (omicsonline.org)
  • An article is published in the Analytical and Bioanalytical Techniques journal after acceptance and clearance. (omicsonline.org)
  • These techniques also tend to form the backbone of most undergraduate analytical chemistry educational labs. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are many more techniques that have specialized applications, and within each major analytical technique there are many applications and variations of the general techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • Journal of Analytical & Bioanalytical Techniues is a scholarly Open Access journal and aims to publish the most complete and reliable source of information on the advanced and very latest research topics. (omicsonline.org)
  • She has published over 105 papers in high ranking analytical journals, has been awarded 7 patents and has received funding of over 7 million US$ supporting her own research activities. (springer.com)
  • Dr Cui's research interests are analytical chemiluminescence (CL) and electrochemiluminescence (ECL), and their applications in interdisciplinary fields including public health, food safety, and environmental monitoring. (springer.com)
  • applications
  • Analytical chemistry plays an increasingly important role in the pharmaceutical industry where, aside from QA, it is used in discovery of new drug candidates and in clinical applications where understanding the interactions between the drug and the patient are critical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Editors
  • The Analytical Review suspended publication in December 1798 after the deaths of Christie (1796) and Wollstonecraft (1797), the conviction of Johnson for seditious libel (1798) and the retirement of other contributing editors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mass
  • An analytical balance (often called a "lab balance") is a class of balance designed to measure small mass in the sub-milligram range. (wikipedia.org)
  • In classical mechanics, analytical dynamics, or more briefly dynamics, is concerned with the relationship between motion of bodies and its causes, namely the forces acting on the bodies and the properties of the bodies, particularly mass and moment of inertia. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • By the middle of the 20th century Aquinas's thought came into dialogue with the analytical tradition through the work of G. E. M. Anscombe, Peter Geach, and Anthony Kenny. (wikipedia.org)
  • The evidence of Analytical Society work appeared in 1816 when Peacock and Herschel completed the translation of Sylvestre Lacroix's textbook An Elementary Treatise on Differential and Integral Calculus that had been started by Babbage. (wikipedia.org)
  • The work on the design of the Analytical Engine started in c. 1833. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • During this period significant contributions to analytical chemistry include the development of systematic elemental analysis by Justus von Liebig and systematized organic analysis based on the specific reactions of functional groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other prominent analytical Marxists include the economist John Roemer, the social scientist Jon Elster, and the sociologist Erik Olin Wright. (wikipedia.org)
  • Philosophers working in the intersection of Thomism and Analytic Philosophy include: Józef Maria Bocheński (Kraków Circle) Meta-ethics Philosophy of religion For an excellent overview of Analytical Thomism see the Introduction in Craig Paterson & Matthew S. Pugh (eds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Usually standardized tests and interviews include an analytical section that requires the examiner to use their logic to pick apart a problem and come up with a solution. (wikipedia.org)
  • General
  • The Analytical Engine incorporated an arithmetic logic unit, control flow in the form of conditional branching and loops, and integrated memory, making it the first design for a general-purpose computer that could be described in modern terms as Turing-complete. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was not until the 1940s that the first general-purpose computers were actually built, more than a century after Babbage had proposed the pioneering Analytical Engine in 1837. (wikipedia.org)
  • During this project, he realized that a much more general design, the Analytical Engine, was possible. (wikipedia.org)
  • uses
  • The Education Analytical Suite uses renowned SAS data management capabilities, enabling fast, easy integration of your data, regardless of native format or platform - including PC files, relational databases, data warehouse appliances or legacy mainframe systems. (sas.com)
  • group
  • The Analytical Society was a group of individuals in early-19th-century Britain whose aim was to promote the use of Leibnizian notation for differentiation in calculus as opposed to the Newton notation for differentiation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Society
  • The practical goal of the Analytical Review was to facilitate this society by summarizing serious new and foreign publications in great depth so that intelligent readers might form their own opinions. (wikipedia.org)
  • It was first published in the mid-1950s by the Society for Analytical Chemistry which merged with other societies in 1980 to form the Royal Society of Chemistry. (wikipedia.org)
  • analysis
  • As a pharmacist's apprentice in Frankfurt, Germany , Fresenius developed an extensive qualitative analysis scheme that, when it was later published, served as the first textbook of analytical chemistry. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Analytical nebulizers are a special category in that their purpose is to deliver a fine mist to spectrometric instruments for elemental analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Analytical nebulizers are used in trace element analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • For instance in systems analysis the systems analyst should focus on four sets of analytical skills: systems thinking, organizational knowledge, problem identification, and problem analyzing and solving. (wikipedia.org)
  • present
  • The discovery of a chemical present in blood that increases the risk of cancer would be a discovery that an analytical chemist might be involved in. (wikipedia.org)
  • instruments
  • The analytical instruments in the department enable us to analyze a wide range of chemical compounds in different matrices such as water, gasoline, agricultural crops, etc. (etsu.edu)