• In addition to these 20, scientists have synthesized more than 70 artificial amino acids that are not found in animals, and more than 100 less common amino acids also occur in biological systems, particularly in plants. (factmonster.com)
  • Each of the common amino acids has, in addition to its chemical name, a more familiar name and a three-letter abbreviation that frequently is used to identify it. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In 1806, French chemists Louis-Nicolas Vauquelin and Pierre Jean Robiquet isolated a compound in asparagus that was subsequently named asparagine, the first amino acid to be discovered. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some amino acids are prone to racemization, one example being lysine , which racemizes via formation pipecolic acid . (wikipedia.org)
  • For most naturally-occurring amino acids, this carbon has the L-configuration. (wikipedia.org)
  • About 500 naturally occurring amino acids are known (though only 20 appear in the genetic code) and can be classified in many ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are also known (slightly confusingly) as alpha-amino acids . (chemguide.co.uk)
  • The various alpha amino acids differ in which side chain (R group) is attached to their alpha carbon. (phys.org)
  • Animals can synthesize certain amino acids. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Although all vertebrates require certain amino acids that their cells cannot synthesize, ruminant animals (such as cattle ) carry within one of the stomachs microbes that synthesize the amino acids needed by the animals. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The key elements of an amino acid are carbon , hydrogen , oxygen , and nitrogen , though other elements are found in the side-chains of certain amino acids. (wn.com)
  • Consequently, amino acids are also precursors of glucose , fatty acids, and ketone bodies and are therefore metabolic fuels. (conservapedia.com)
  • Further remarkable applications of ß-amino acids are the use as protease inhibitors, 11 precursors for antibiotics 12 and building blocks in cryptophycins. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • When you cannot find the amino acid you are looking for, or for additional technical information, please contact your local Sigma-Aldrich Office. (sigmaaldrich.com)
  • L-amino-acid oxidases convert L-amino acids to the alpha- ketoacids , which are susceptible to reductive amination. (wikipedia.org)
  • 4.Briefly explain how hydrophobic amino acids (and the rest) are distributed in the tertiary structure of protein? (scribd.com)
  • 5. Briefly explain with examples how amino acids are classified as hydrophobic or hydrophilic? (scribd.com)
  • The non-polar side chain amino acids are called hydrophobic and the amino acid with uncharged polar side chain is called hydrophilic. (scribd.com)
  • These amino acids are hydrophobic and have no charge on the 'R' group. (scribd.com)
  • Herradon and Seebach (1989) Mono- and Dialkylation of Derivatives of (1R,2S)-2-Hydroxyxyclopentanecarboxylic Acid and -cyclohexanecarboxylic Acid via Bicylic Dioxannes Selective Generation of Three Contiguous Stereogenic Centers on a Cyclohexane Ring, Helv. (freepatentsonline.com)
  • They are formed from an mRNA template in a process called translation, by which genetic information, encoded in the form of nucleic acids, is translated into the amino acids essential for protein synthesis. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Humans can not synthesize all of these amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Not all organisms are able to synthesize all amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • Of the 20-odd amino acids, there are 8 (or 9 , due to the expert factor ) that the body cannot synthesize for itself. (everything2.com)
  • In water, the ionic attractions between the ions in the solid amino acid are replaced by strong attractions between polar water molecules and the zwitterions. (chemguide.co.uk)
  • Non Polar Amino Acids have equal number of amino and carboxyl groups and are neutral. (scribd.com)
  • Polar Amino Acids with Negative Charge Polar amino acids with negative charge have more carboxyl groups than amino groups making them acidic. (scribd.com)
  • For the non-biological synthesis of amino acids, see Strecker amino acid synthesis . (wikipedia.org)
  • It became evident that the potential biological or pharmacological applications of amino acids are greatly restricted to the one form of the enantiomers. (springer.com)
  • Because of their biological significance, amino acids are important in nutrition and are commonly used in nutritional supplements, fertilizers, and food technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • At this point I would normally try to relate the actual values for solubility of the various amino acids to their structures. (chemguide.co.uk)