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  • citizenship
  • Further, they argue, while American Indians within the United States are acknowledged to still belong to their various indigenous polities, they are also citizens of the U.S. under provision of the 1887 General Allotment Act and the 1924 Indian Citizenship Act and are thus doubly subordinate to the federal system. (nzdl.org)
  • But one element is constant: "There's frustration with the jurisdictional maze on Indian territory," says Carrie Garrow, a former St. Regis Mohawk Tribal Court judge and the executive director of the Center for Indigenous Law, Governance and Citizenship at Syracuse University. (blogspot.com)
  • Deloria's father, Vine Sr., studied English and Christian theology, became an Episcopal archdeacon and missionary on the Standing Rock Indian Reservation, to which he transferred the family's Sioux Tribe citizenship. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • The Indian termination policy was implemented in the 1950s and 1960s to assimilate the Native Americans into mainstream American society, by terminating the government's trusteeship of Indian reservations and making Indians assume all the responsibilities of full citizenship. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • In the interview Tuesday, while Warren acknowledges she 'can't go back,' she says she's sorry 'for furthering confusion on tribal sovereignty and tribal citizenship and harm that resulted. (boston25news.com)
  • I haven't spoken with anyone since I saw this information, no, but my apology is an apology for not having been more sensitive about tribal citizenship and tribal sovereignty,' Warren said. (boston25news.com)
  • American citizenship goes beyond the official naturalization process. (smu.edu)
  • Caroline Brettell , cultural anthropologist at Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, with Deborah Reed-Danahay, examined sociocultural spaces in Indian and Vietnamese immigrant communities in the Dallas-Arlington-Fort Worth, Texas area for the book Civic Engagements: The Citizenship Practices of Indian and Vietnamese Immigrants (Stanford University Press, 2011). (smu.edu)
  • The University Distinguished Professor, and director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, describes how religious and ethnic organizations provide places for refugees and immigrants to develop their own ways of expressing their American citizenship through daily living and honing civic and leadership skills, such as meetings, festivals or banquets. (smu.edu)
  • struggle
  • Ethnic Hawaiian activists also try to build solidarity with Asians to create a large majority of Hawai'i's people who will see the Hawaiian sovereignty movement as a struggle of dark-skinned people against oppression by whites and by the U.S. government. (angelfire.com)
  • The struggle over land has defined relations between the U.S. Government and Native Americans. (ourdocuments.gov)
  • Modern "Indian wars" are fought over land and treaty rights, artistic appropriation, and academic analysis, while Native communities struggle among themselves over membership, money, and cultural meaning. (jhu.edu)
  • In Indian Country: Essays on Contemporary Native Culture , Gail Guthrie Valaskakis uses a cultural studies approach to offer a unique perspective on Native political struggle and cultural conflict in both Canada and the United States. (jhu.edu)
  • nomadic
  • Becoming White Clay: A History and Archaeology of Jicarilla Apache Enclavement (University of Utah Press, 2012) by B. Sunday Eiselt , anthropology professor in SMU's Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, tells the story of one of the longest-enduring and most successful nomadic enclaves in North America. (smu.edu)
  • nations
  • The question of self-governance among American Indian nations encapsulated within what is now the United States of America is one of the more confused issues in modern politics. (nzdl.org)
  • While there is a general understanding that the indigenous nations of North America once existed as fully self-governing entities, those concerned with the matter have proven spectacularly unable to arrive at even a common definition of what constitutes (or might constitute) contemporary Indian self-governance, whether it presently exists or, if it does not, how it might be achieved. (nzdl.org)
  • The present paper is an effort to examine both the proper meanings (facts) of self-governance and misunderstandings (fantasies), apply these observations to the situation in which Indian nations presently find themselves vis a vis the U.S., and advance a prospectus for Indian self-governance over the coming decades. (nzdl.org)
  • From this, we may readily discern that American Indian nations possess every legal and moral right to conduct themselves as such, unless they themselves have knowingly, willingly and formally given up such rights. (nzdl.org)
  • The bottom line, from the federal perspective is therefore that American Indian nations enjoy a "limited sovereignty. (nzdl.org)
  • An Indian considered himself a Delaware, a Dakota, a Navajo, or a member of one of the hundreds of other Indian nations in the Americas. (britannica.com)
  • Later, Native Americans in Canada began to refer to themselves as First Nations. (britannica.com)
  • The site of the ceremony, Congressional Cemetery, is the burial site for 36 tribal representatives from 12 American Indian nations who died in the region while representing their people, according to the Faith and Politics Institute, a group that helped present Wednesday's event. (ljworld.com)
  • The Choctaw and Chickasaw settlement in Oklahoma - the first Indian water settlement to be finalized in that state - reflects a unique and collaborative approach to water management in the Nations' historic treaty territories. (turtleisland.org)
  • Jay has actively sought opportunities to increase AI/AN representation within GAO and brought in numerous speakers to educate GAO employees on federal trust responsibility, tribal sovereignty, and building effective working relationships with tribal nations. (saige.org)
  • Ruben-who's asked me to use that name to protect his identity-says he can't count how many times he's played vigilante since then in the Indian nations of northeastern Oklahoma. (blogspot.com)
  • At times, victories for American Indians in U.S. courts have meant greater freedom for other Americans, as with religious freedom: at other times, their legal status as "domestic dependent nations" has meant that they are uniquely beholden to a government not their own. (unc.edu)
  • termination
  • Whether contesting termination locally, demanding reparations for stolen lands in the federal courts, or placing their case for decolonization in a global context, American Indians use institutions and political rhetorics that they did not necessarily create to their own ends. (google.com)
  • Scholars
  • In 1969, at the annual meeting of the African Studies Association in Montreal, some African and African American scholars publicly expressed their justified outrage at the white domination of this organization by staging a walk-out and an occupation protest. (racismreview.com)
  • issues
  • We will also consider the gradual emancipation of American Indian individuals from their status as enemies, wards of the state and objects of scientific study, de-tribalized and racially quantified citizens, and finally as dual citizens of the U.S. In a number of assignments, both individual and group, students will create and refine entries on Wikipedia that share their understanding of these issues with the larger world. (unc.edu)
  • He also lectured on issues relating to Native Americans in the United States in the ethnic studies program. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Bowman brings with her a strong presence and solid understanding of the issues facing American Indian students and communities. (bpcwi.com)
  • They were followed by several speakers who addressed issues of cultural survival, of civil rights, of sovereignty. (parliamentofreligions.org)
  • Senate Committee
  • Several of his reports resulted in Congressional oversight hearings before the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, the House Appropriations Committee, and others. (saige.org)
  • cultural
  • This course explores birth and death as essential human rites of passage informed by changing American historical and cultural contexts. (unc.edu)
  • This seminar uses active interdisciplinary learning to expose the ways that various Americans have historically defined the meanings of these passages through different processes of cultural power. (unc.edu)
  • The Cultural areas of pre-Columbian North America , according to Alfred Kroeber . (wikipedia.org)
  • Grounded in theory and threaded with Native voices and evocative descriptions of "Indian" experience (including the author's), the essays interweave historical and political process, personal narrative, and cultural critique. (jhu.edu)
  • This event inspired American Indians across the country and gradually led to changes at the reservation, with a revival of some cultural traditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • tribe
  • Many claimed to be Cherokee, or simply said they were Indian, without a definite tribe. (multiracial.com)
  • Vine Deloria, Jr. (March 26, 1933 - November 13, 2005) was an a Native American author , theologian, historian , and political activist from the Yankton Sioux tribe of South Dakota . (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • On December 22, 2010, Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs Larry Echo Hawk reestablished the government-to-government relationship between the California Valley Miwok Tribe, a federally-recognized tribe, and the United States government. (ourciea.org)
  • The Tribe commends the Assistant Secretary for upholding tribal sovereignty with this decision and for recognizing the inherent right of each federally-recognized Indian tribe to determine its own membership and form of government. (ourciea.org)
  • More than 50 years later, King Philip's War (1675-1676) of Indian allies against the English colonists resulted in the death of 40 percent of the surviving tribe. (wikipedia.org)
  • Clovis
  • One of the most distinctive Paleo-Indian artifact types is the Clovis point , the first of which was discovered on a kill site near what is now Clovis, New Mexico . (britannica.com)
  • colonial
  • We will consider how it is that Indians came to "lose" the land in colonial America. (unc.edu)
  • Critical to their success was their ability to extend key aspects of Plains-Pueblo exchange to Indian and mixed-blood communities on the fringes of colonial rule. (smu.edu)
  • 1960s
  • Of course there was heroine and other opioids in the 1960s and 70s, but back then most American Indians struggling with addiction - drank. (ampers.org)
  • wards
  • A Congressman backing a land bill recently characterized Indians as wards of the federal government. (films.com)
  • artifacts
  • The Peruvian Necropolis and its bundles filled with bodies and artifacts were the basis for Dorseys subsequent Ph.D. in anthropology, which was the very first awarded to an American in the United States, and the first awarded at Harvard. (hackerfall.com)
  • counties
  • Article I of the U.S. Constitution affirms quite clearly that subordinate sovereignties such as states, counties, municipalities and individuals or groups of individuals are prohibited from entering into treaty agreements. (nzdl.org)
  • Constitution
  • Whatever the' diploma trademarks' Restricted, the wise relationship of the Constitution and the proportional editors in America since its researching results that similarity the Article of treatment does not Usually what the states of the Constitution chose in energy. (montessori-kolbermoor.de)
  • In testimony to the Senate Indian Affairs Committee, a DOJ official said that health care for these groups could violate the U.S. Constitution. (nativeamericannetroots.net)
  • 1997
  • I was elected as a Board Director of SAIGE from 2008 - 2013 and have been the Native American Special Emphasis Program Manager (SEPM) since 1997. (saige.org)
  • settlements
  • The total $3 billion in funding authorized for Indian water rights settlements during the current Administration represents a major commitment to help provide safe drinking water and support economic development activities, including hydroelectric power, agriculture improvement and water marketing. (turtleisland.org)
  • Each of the settlements had widespread local and bipartisan congressional support, and implementing the agreements will bring much needed investments to Indian country, help stabilize water supplies in various communities, and improve water resources management for all concerned, including non-Indian communities. (turtleisland.org)
  • anthropological
  • This was fitting, given that the Ancn display was essential to what Boas, Putnam, and others believed was the anthropological expositions core mission at the Fair: offering a Pre-Columbian baseline against which white American societyand supposedly disappearing Northern Native Americanscould be judged. (hackerfall.com)
  • scholarly
  • We will explore - through independent research and collective discussion - a variety of representations of American birth and death through literary expressions, photography and film, material and commercial culture, scholarly inquiry, and institutional practice. (unc.edu)
  • Several of his scholarly texts are now used as standard works in Indian law and policy classes throughout the United States. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Affairs
  • Jay earned a Master's of Jurisprudence in Indian Law from the University of Tulsa and a Master's of Public Affairs from the University of Texas at Dallas. (saige.org)
  • Following generations of genocide, Native Americans have largely persisted in the sad state of affairs created by relegation to reservation life. (allstarrchiro.net)
  • His first work, Custer Died for Your Sins (1969) was one of the most influential books written on Indian affairs and helped launch the field of Native American studies. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • Great Lakes
  • The East North Central Division includes Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, and Wisconsin, all of which are also part of the Great Lakes region . (wikipedia.org)
  • The states of the Old Northwest are also known as Great Lakes states and are east-north central in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • recognition
  • Q: U.S. Rep. Frank Wolf, R-McLean, is one key figure who has held up progress on recognition because of his concerns about opening the door to Indian casinos. (mcall.com)
  • federal
  • One of Bowman's first orders of business as NIEA president will be to address the growing funding needs of Indian education at the federal level. (bpcwi.com)
  • broader
  • No prior knowledge about American Indians or Wikipedia is expected, but upon completion, students will gain a powerful new understanding of the country we all share, and familiarity with a tool that allows them to distribute what they know to the broader population. (unc.edu)
  • California
  • More than $28 million was authorized for the Pechanga Band of Luiseño Mission Indians, located in southern California, enabling them to gain secure water supplies. (turtleisland.org)
  • California Indian Education Association, Inc. (ourciea.org)