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  • Cleaves
  • The mechanism by which the glucosidase cleaves the α -1,6-linkage is not fully known because the amino acids in the active site have not yet been identified. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein
  • Recombinant protein encompassing a sequence within the N-terminus region of human alpha Glucosidase II. (genetex.com)
  • The protein belongs to the mainly alpha class, and contains 19 helices and 9 strands. (wikipedia.org)
  • The monomeric protein contains a central domain in which eight parallel beta-strands are surrounded by eight parallel alpha strands. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characterization
  • To our knowledge, this is the first report on the characterization of an alpha-glucosidase from the halophilic Archaea, which could serve as a new model to gain insights into carbon metabolism in this understudied microbial group. (mdpi.com)
  • catalytic
  • Moreover, computational analyses for the detection of functional domains, active and catalytic sites, as well as 3D structural predictions revealed a close relationship with an E. coli YicI-like alpha-xylosidase of the GH31 family. (mdpi.com)
  • human
  • 2008). "Implication of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase isoforms (alpha, beta, gamma and delta) in CD4+ T-cell infection with human immunodeficiency virus type I". J. Gen. Virol. (wikipedia.org)
  • beta
  • It is a multienzyme complex which possesses alpha-L-rhamnosidase and beta glucosidase active centers. (wikipedia.org)
  • One complicating issue is that the alpha and beta conformations were originally defined based on the relative orientation of the major constituents in a Haworth projection. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this case, for D-sugars, a beta conformation would see the major constituent at each carbon drawn above the plane of the ring (nominally the same conformation), while alpha would see the anomeric constituent below the ring (nominally opposite conformations). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cellobiases (EC 3.2.1.21) or beta-glucosidases hydrolyse the exocellulase product into individual monosaccharides. (wikipedia.org)