Loading...
  • among
  • To determine whether methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) USA300 commonly caused infections among Alaska Natives, we examined clinical MRSA isolates from the Alaska Native Medical Center, Anchorage, during 2000-2006. (cdc.gov)
  • We wondered whether, over time, USA300 might replace USA400 among Alaska Natives as it has elsewhere in North America ( 4 , 5 ). (cdc.gov)
  • year
  • A randomly selected sample of 163 (28.7%) of the 567 isolates, stratified by year of isolation, was chosen for genotyping, including 20% of the isolates from Anchorage-region residents, 20% from residents of southwestern Alaska, and all isolates from residents of other regions ( Table 1 ). (cdc.gov)
  • community
  • In contrast, in 1996, 2000, and 2004-2006, in rural southwestern Alaska, we found that USA300 was rarely isolated, although community-associated MRSA SSTIs were common. (cdc.gov)
  • populations
  • Dr. Volkow discusses NIDA's efforts to develop effective antismoking treatments for populations with persistently high rates of smoking, such as people with psychiatric disorders, high school dropouts, and Native Americans. (drugabuse.gov)
  • Excessive alcohol consumption is a leading preventable cause of death in the United States ( 1 ) and has substantial public health impact on American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations ( 2 ). (cdc.gov)
  • prevalence
  • Since 1978, the prevalence of cigarette smoking has declined for African-American, Asian-American and Pacific-Islander, Hispanic, and white women of reproductive age (18-44 years) but not for American-Indian and Alaska-Native women. (cdc.gov)
  • The prevalence of using any medical service to help get pregnant was lower for American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) (PPR: 0.60, 95% CI 0.43-0.83) and black (PPR: 0.53, 95% CI 0.44-0.63) compared to white women and in Hispanic compared to non-Hispanic women (PPR: 0.57, 95% CI 0.48-0.67). (springer.com)
  • Sitka
  • After a welcome from ANMC executive leadership to the large group in attendance, Bishop David Mahaffey from the Diocese of Sitka and Alaska, gave a blessing for the event and provided a history of the starring ceremony. (anthc.org)
  • tribes
  • All federally recognized Tribes in Alaska are all eligible to administer FDPIR, provided they can follow USDA regulations to guarantee food safety, protect client privacy and meet on-time reporting requirements. (anthc.org)
  • In 2003, there were more than 560 federally recognized American Indian/Alaska Native tribes, with the largest tribes being Cherokee and Navajo. (ed.gov)
  • YKHC serves 25,000 Alaska Natives representing 58 federally-recognized tribes. (wkkf.org)
  • ANTHC
  • Research activities have had a dramatic impact on the lives of the Alaska Native people and ANTHC recognizes the importance of maintaining a robust research department with staff who are dedicated to research with Alaska Native people and who understand the importance of Tribally-driven research. (anthc.org)
  • While not an academic institution, where staff are retained through tenure, ANTHC supports research through direct funding for core research staff and research projects, administrative and logistics support, and in fostering collaboration with academic institutions in Alaska and elsewhere. (anthc.org)
  • Research conducted by ANTHC is Tribally-driven, meaning that the ANTHC Board of Directors has reviewed and approved research that meets ANTHC health priorities and supports research necessary to improve Alaska Native health care and health status. (anthc.org)
  • collaboration
  • We Breathe Again," Heartbreak & Hope in Alaska, is a collaboration between Gwanzhii LLC, the Indigenous Leadership Institute and Crawl Walk Run, whose principals form a tight-knit team that began filming more than a year ago in several locations around the state. (indiancountrynews.net)
  • people
  • It has been established to assist Native people, government agencies, educators and the general public in gaining access to the knowledge base that Alaska Natives have acquired through cumulative experience over millennia. (healthfinder.gov)
  • In the 2000 Census, 4.1 million people (about 1.5 percent of the U.S. population) identified themselves as American Indian and/or Alaska Native, solely or in combination with one or more other racial or ethnic groups. (peoplesworld.org)
  • Alaska's Native people are divided into eleven distinct cultures, speaking twenty different languages. (akhistorycourse.org)
  • percentage
  • A larger percentage (66 percent) of American Indian/Alaska Native 8th-grade students reported absences from school in the preceding month than 8th-grade students of any other race/ethnicity in 2007 (36 to 57 percent). (ed.gov)
  • In 2006, a smaller percentage of American Indian/Alaska Native students (75 percent) reported receiving a high school diploma than White (91 percent) and Asian/Pacific Islander students (93 percent). (ed.gov)
  • A smaller percentage of American Indian/ Alaska Native 2-year-olds than 2-year-olds in all other groups demonstrated specific cognitive skills in vocabulary, listening comprehension, matching, and counting in 2003-04. (ed.gov)
  • population
  • Additionally a number of staff who are primarily engaged in clinical care are able to dedicate time to translational research that has application and clinical relevance to the Alaska Native population they serve. (anthc.org)
  • The target population for the initiative included American Indian and Alaska Natives who were HIV-positive or at risk for HIV infection with co-morbidities of substance abuse (including alcohol), sexually transmitted infections and/or mental illness. (hrsa.gov)
  • In 2006, 27 percent of American Indian/Alaska Native individuals lived in poverty compared to 13 percent of the general population. (ed.gov)
  • This printable map shows the percent of the U.S. population by county who are American Indian or Alaska Native. (sprc.org)
  • percent
  • During the 2005-06 school year, some 644,000 public elementary and secondary school students, or about 1 percent of all public school students, were American Indian/Alaska Native. (ed.gov)
  • In 2004, American Indian/Alaska Native students in grades kindergarten through 12 had a lower suspension rate (7 percent) than Black students (15 percent), but a higher rate than students of all other racial/ethnic groups. (ed.gov)
  • Program
  • The Alaska program was unsuccessfully challenged by the American Dental Association -- and the ADA continues to block expansion to other reservations through a provision in the Indian Health Care Improvement Act. (hcn.org)
  • There are so many reasons why this program must be expanded beyond Alaska. (hcn.org)
  • Alaska has proudly put the DHAT program on the national map. (wkkf.org)
  • Bureau
  • During 2006-07, Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) schools served nearly 48,500 American Indian/Alaska Native students. (ed.gov)
  • The IHS was created in 1954 as part of the Public Health Service when responsibility for American Indian and Alaska Native health care was transferred from the Department of the Interior's Bureau of Indian Affairs to the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. (ed.gov)
  • eligible
  • To be eligible for HRRC review, all research must first be reviewed and approved by the IHS Alaska Area Institutional Review Board (AAIRB). (anthc.org)
  • issues
  • Despite this history of extraordinary neglect by the federal government of Native American health issues, there is one very hopeful development. (peoplesworld.org)