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  • embryo
  • AAAS endorses a legally enforceable ban on efforts to implant a human cloned embryo for the purpose of reproduction. (aaas.org)
  • The government of Canada defines a human clone as, "an embryo that, as a result of the manipulation of human reproductive material or an in vitro embryo, contains a diploid set of chromosomes obtained from a single - living or deceased - human being, foetus or embryo" (Health Canada). (scribd.com)
  • Yesterday, scientists in South Korea announced - through publication in the Journal Science Express - the first successful cloning of a human embryo, and the subsequent derivation of a line of stem cells from that clone. (washingtontimes.com)
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reconstructed cell must then be stimulated to start cell division, and eventually develop into a cloned embryo, which is transferred into a female host. (roninpen.com)
  • Jeffrey Keenan is the Director of the Southeastern Center for Fertility and Reproductive Medicine and the main developer behind the National Embryo Donation Center (NEDC) in Knoxville, Tennessee. (asu.edu)
  • Life Magazine's 1965 cover story "Drama of Life Before Birth" featured photographs of embryos and fetuses taken by Swedish photojournalist Lennart Nilsson to document the developmental stages of a human embryo. (asu.edu)
  • The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 established the legal framework that governs infertility treatment, medical services ancillary to infertility treatment such as embryo storage, and all human embryological research performed in the UK. (asu.edu)
  • In 1934 a fourteen-day-old embryo was discovered during a postmortem examination and became famous for being the youngest known human embryo specimen at the time. (asu.edu)
  • Brave New W
  • Many works of literature and film have explored cloning as a dystopic concept, such as Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" and the film/novel " Never Let Me Go. (outerplaces.com)
  • Perhaps the first step will be the production of a clone from a single fertilized egg, as in Brave New World . (wikipedia.org)
  • Through gene manipulation you can make the clone quite subservient, as illustrated in Aldous Huxley's Brave New World. (roninpen.com)
  • SCNT
  • In January 2008, Dr. Andrew French and Samuel Wood of the biotechnology company Stemagen announced that they successfully created the first five mature human embryos using SCNT. (wikipedia.org)
  • HCPI has urged its supporters and allied organizations, including disease advocates, private citizens, members of biotechnology organizations, physicians, lawyers and members of the scientific research community, to support passage of UN initiatives outlawing human reproductive cloning, but which allow for the promise of SCNT. (innovations-report.com)
  • It opposes the Costa Rican proposed convention, which bans SCNT research and urges support for the rival Belgium compromise convention, which encourages member states to ban reproductive cloning, but would not ban SCNT internationally. (innovations-report.com)
  • embryonic
  • Telomerase is an enzyme that regulates the lengths of telomeres in the cells of many organisms, and in humans it begins to function int the early stages of embryonic development. (asu.edu)
  • In 1996, Woodring Wright and his team examined human embryonic cells and found that telomerase was active in them. (asu.edu)
  • Humans inherit mitochondria from their mothers, and mechanisms have evolved to eliminate sperm mitochondria in early embryonic development. (asu.edu)
  • vitro
  • Eventually animal research may indicate that human cloning can be accomplished with no greater risk than in vitro fertilization posed when Louise Brown, the first "test-tube baby" was born in 1978. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Rorvik wrote magazine articles and books in which he discussed emerging methods and technologies that contributed to the progression of reproductive health, including sex determination, in vitro fertilization, and human cloning. (asu.edu)
  • He published his results as 'The Limited In Vitro Lifetime of Human Diploid Cell Strains' in 1964. (asu.edu)
  • perils
  • Another Nobel Laureate , James D. Watson , publicized the potential and the perils of cloning in his Atlantic Monthly essay, "Moving Toward the Clonal Man", in 1971. (wikipedia.org)
  • nucleus
  • Theoretically, tissues generated from cells cloned from a patient's own adult nucleus should not trigger an immune response, but it is possible that subtle differences caused by the foreign cytoplasm in the donor egg might cause a rejection response. (encyclopedia.com)
  • wildlife
  • In terms of wildlife, artificial cloning will enable us to revive endangered species or even extinct species, for example, dinosaurs. (writesmyessays.com)
  • The program tests industrial and agricultural chemicals for hormonal impacts in humans and in wildlife that may disrupt organisms' endocrine systems. (asu.edu)
  • women's
  • The magazine featured literary pieces on topics like women's rights, love and marriage, women in the workplace, reproductive and sexual education, and contraception. (asu.edu)
  • Irving Freiler Stein Sr. was a physician who studied women's reproductive health during the twentieth century in the United States. (asu.edu)
  • In partnership with his colleague, Michael Leventhal, Stein identified a women's reproductive disorder related to elevated male sex hormones, or androgens. (asu.edu)
  • embryos and fetuses
  • These black-and-white photographs portray skeletal structures and intact bodies of chicken embryos and human embryos and fetuses obtained from collections belonging to universities and medical institutions. (asu.edu)
  • His photography was the first to capture early human development and the developmental stages of embryos and fetuses. (asu.edu)
  • Zavos
  • Siegel stated, "By sponsoring the World Court Initiative, HCPI seeks that the World Court strip away any vestige of legitimacy from potential human cloners, such as Zavos and Antinori. (innovations-report.com)
  • Subject
  • Such a high failure rate is fine when it comes to animals, but we wouldn't want to subject humans to that. (roninpen.com)
  • attempts
  • Though neither of these attempts were successful, both show that attempts on human cloning will still occur as long as there is no worldwide legislation. (scribd.com)
  • Over 90% of cloning attempts fail to produce viable offspring. (roninpen.com)
  • research
  • There have also been many moral and religious objections, as using human eggs for research can be interpreted as the destruction of human life. (outerplaces.com)
  • Years earlier, in October of 1995, Clinton had established the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC) in light of bioethical concerns over research on humans. (scribd.com)
  • As stated in Executive Order 12975 by which the NBAC was organized, the purpose of this Commission was to recommend regulations on "bioethical issues arising from research on human biology and behaviour. (scribd.com)
  • ban all federal funding for cloning research as well as asking for a temporary voluntary moratorium on cloning research by private institutions until more could be learned about the issue. (scribd.com)
  • Obviously his research failed, but, no doubt at the expense of many human embryos. (scribd.com)
  • The main argument for why cloning research should be continued is the possible benefits it can have. (scribd.com)
  • These are all issues that need to be addressed before human cloning research can proceed. (roninpen.com)
  • Both organizations are members of the Coalition for the Advancement of Medical Research. (innovations-report.com)
  • organs
  • The tragic state of human trafficking in the world should be an indication that, if cloning ever becomes economically viable, then there is a large demand in the black market for organs and slaves. (roninpen.com)
  • animal
  • The scientific evidence documenting the serious health risks associated with reproductive cloning, as shown through animal studies, make it unconscionable to undertake this procedure. (aaas.org)
  • In animal cloning, the manipulated cell is returned to the uterine environment for development. (writesmyessays.com)
  • researchers
  • But the researchers insist that this concern is separate from the purely medical interest in treatments for diseases such as diabetes, and that nearly all professionals are opposed to human cloning. (outerplaces.com)
  • Had it been the latter (a technique almost universally condemned as unethical), the researchers could have attempted to initiate a pregnancy by implanting the cloned embryos in a womb. (washingtontimes.com)
  • By 2011, researchers in the US had established that non-invasive blood tests can accurately determine the gender of a human fetus as early as seven weeks after fertilization. (asu.edu)
  • The researchers sought to identify Sry gene as the gene that produced the testis determining factor protein (Tdf protein in mice or TDF protein in humans), which initiates the formation of testis. (asu.edu)
  • identical
  • Usually the members of a clone are identical in their inherited characteristics that is, in their genes except for any differences caused by mutation. (freeessay.com)
  • create
  • For example, Harvard graduate and founder of a company dedicated to reproductive technology, Richard Seed declared that he would move to Japan and be the first to create a human clone (Andrews). (scribd.com)
  • In the agricultural sector, cloning can be used to create animals and plants that produce high yields. (writesmyessays.com)
  • medicine
  • This relatively new concept can potentially impact the fields of medicine, agriculture and human life. (writesmyessays.com)
  • In medicine, cloning facilitates drug production and treatment. (writesmyessays.com)
  • David Michael Rorvik is a science journalist who publicized advancements in the field of reproductive medicine during the late twentieth century. (asu.edu)
  • Smellie, a physician and instructor in obstetrics in Great Britain, published these compilations to share his expertise in reproductive medicine, while also providing his students and colleagues with a source of reference in their own medical practices. (asu.edu)
  • technology advances
  • At the same time, we encourage continuing open and inclusive public dialogue, in which the scientific community is an active participant, on the scientific and ethical aspects of human cloning as our understanding of this technology advances. (aaas.org)
  • So if the technology advances to a point where human cloning has a high probability of success, there are legitimate demands that will need to be considered. (roninpen.com)
  • tend
  • Part of the issue is that people tend to disagree on what one can even consider a human being. (scribd.com)
  • Strains
  • Harald zur Hausen studied viruses and discovered that certain strains of the human papilloma virus (HPV), a sexually transmitted disease, can cause cervical cancer, in Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. (asu.edu)