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  • genetic
  • And, fourth, techniques for repairing any intrinsic disease-causing genetic defects and transplantation of the repaired, differentiated cells into the patient. (stembook.org)
  • 2006 ), or by using ES cell lines established from embryos following preimplantation genetic diagnosis (Eiges et al. (stembook.org)
  • We also saw that the embryos that developed the furthest were from the same egg donors, suggesting that genetic variation between egg donors plays an important role in the developmental potential of cloned embryos. (bioethics.net)
  • Nobel Prize-winning geneticist Joshua Lederberg advocated cloning and genetic engineering in an article in The American Naturalist in 1966 and again, the following year, in The Washington Post . (wikipedia.org)
  • From the first moment, the genetic code in concert with the cellular environment, orchestrates the myriad of messages necessary to assemble the human form. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • Spindle replacement, also called spindle transfer, is the process of removing the genetic material found in the nucleus of one egg cell, or oocyte, and placing it in another egg that had its nucleus removed. (asu.edu)
  • Mitochondria are organelles found in all cells and contain some of the cell's genetic material. (asu.edu)
  • The first scenario would preclude the possibility of changing one type of mature cell into another because the cell would no longer contain the genetic wherewithal to perform all possible functions. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • British embryologist Sir Ian Wilmut, best known for his work in the field of animal genetic engineering and the successful cloning of sheep, was born 7 July 1944 in Hampton Lucy, England. (asu.edu)
  • Because few studies exist to describe the unique molecular network regulation behind pig pre-implantation embryonic development (PED), genetic engineering in the pig embryo is limited. (biomedcentral.com)
  • This cell contains a different set of genetic instructions (resulting in an alternative pattern of gene expression) and is characterized by a reduced proliferative capacity and more restricted developmental potential than its parent. (jci.org)
  • The experiment that led to the cloning of Dolly the sheep in 1997 was different: It used a cloning technique called somatic cell nuclear transfer and resulted in an animal that was a genetic twin -- although delayed in time -- of an adult sheep. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • Unlike sexual reproduction, during which a new organism is formed when the genetic material of the egg and sperm fuse, in nuclear transplantation cloning there is a single genetic "parent. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • Researchers working with clones of a Holstein cow say genetic programming errors may explain why so many cloned animals die, either as fetuses or newborns. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • This review summarizes the application of cell reprogramming technologies to cancer modeling and treatment and discusses possible obstacles, such as genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer cells, as well as the strategies that can be used to overcome these obstacles to cancer research. (springer.com)
  • Wilmut, McWhir, and Campbell collaborated with Angelica Schnieke and Alex J. Kind at PPL Therapeutics in Roslin, a company researching cloning and genetic manipulation for livestock. (asu.edu)
  • Up to this point in history, all that scientists knew was that within the nucleus of a cell there was genetic information, and this nucleus was bathed within the surrounding fluid in the cell, known as the cytoplasm. (harvardsciencereview.com)
  • Many scientists shared this hypothesis, as well as the idea that some factors within the cytoplasm cause irreversible changes to the genetic material in the nuclei of cells. (harvardsciencereview.com)
  • In metazoan, all cell types, with the exception of mature germ cells, contain the same genetic information within the species. (stembook.org)
  • The FDA claims "Clones are really just genetic copies of the animals from which they are produced" and that claim is parroted by bureaucrats in EU. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • She provided a model to study how neural circuits develop and function in the human brain, as the genetic regulatory pathways are similar. (asu.edu)
  • experiments
  • This chronology also addresses subsequent reports of other cloning experiments, including the first one using human cells. (unt.edu)
  • The experiments indicated how to reprogram nuclei from differentiated cells to produce live offspring, and that a single population of differentiated cells could produce multiple offspring. (asu.edu)
  • In the 1990s, researchers working at the Roslin Institute in Edinburgh, Scotland, performed cloning experiments in collaboration with PPL Therapeutics in Roslin, Scotland, on human coagulation factor IX, a protein. (asu.edu)
  • Experiments are performed on mouse and sheep. (edu.pl)
  • Tasmanian Senator Guy Barnett recently summarised the key issue with the current legislation when he says MPs will be voting to permit the creation of human embryos for experiments. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • In experiments pioneered by Gurdon and subsequently extended by others, the nucleus of a specialized adult cell is transferred to an enucleated egg. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • In a series of experiments between 1960 and 1965, Robert Geoffrey Edwards discovered how to make mammalian egg cells, or oocytes, mature outside of a female's body. (asu.edu)
  • Conrad Hal Waddington's "Experiments on Embryonic Induction III," published in 1934 in the Journal of Experimental Biology, describes the discovery that the primitive streak induces the mammalian embryo. (asu.edu)
  • Vibrational Cues in Predator-Induced Hatching of Red-Eyed Treefrogs' (2005), Karen Warkentin reported on experiments she conducted to see how red-eyed treefrog embryos, Agalychnis callidryas, can distinguish between vibrations due to predator attacks and other environmental occurrences, such as storms. (asu.edu)
  • At a time when only a few developmental biologists studied cell death, or apoptosis, Saunders and his colleagues showed that researchers could use embryological experiments to uncover the causal mechanisms of apotosis. (asu.edu)
  • In their experiments, Wiesel and Hubel used kittens as models for human children. (asu.edu)
  • Mechnikov discovered phagocytes, immune cells that protect organisms by ingesting foreign particles or microorganisms, by conducting experiments on starfish larvae. (asu.edu)
  • The goals of those experiments were to increase transfection efficiency in primary cells and to maintain transgene expression long enough (a few weeks) for iPS cell induction. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • ethical
  • Since the first fertilization of a human egg in the laboratory in 1968, scientific and technological breakthroughs have raised ethical dilemmas and generated policy controversies on both sides of the Atlantic. (scribd.com)
  • Over time, he argues, partisan debate and religious-secular polarization have come to overshadow ethical reflection and political deliberation on the moral status of the embryo and the promise of biomedical research. (scribd.com)
  • I believe that the moral status of the embryo and the promise of biomedical research to reduce human suffering are critical and complex ethical issues. (scribd.com)
  • Information on presidential actions and legislative activities related to the ethical and moral issues surrounding cloning is provided, as well as relevant Web sites. (unt.edu)
  • These ethical concerns have prompted several nations to pass laws regarding human cloning and its legality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their report on human-animal chimeras set a worldwide precedent for discussions of the ethical use of those embryos in labs. (asu.edu)
  • Technical and financial hurdles add to ethical and safety concerns over embryonic stems cells while adult stem cells are achieving remarkable clinic successes. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • ISIS had already pointed out at the time that research on hES cells was ethically unjustifiable, especially given that adult stem cells, easily obtainable from the patients themselves (see Box 1), appeared just as developmentally flexible as ES cells, and showed much greater promise in the clinic without either the ethical concerns or the risks of cancer from hES cells [2- (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Thus, the prospect of applying this technique in humans is troubling for scientific and safety reasons in addition to a variety of ethical reasons related to our ideas about the natural ordering of family and successive generations. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • Posts in this category pertain to the moral, ethical, legal, scientific, and philosophical matters regarding the use of adult and embryonic stem cells in research and treatement. (chipbennett.net)
  • As scientists continue to advance techniques in cloning technologies, we have seen an increase in the number of ethical debates on the future of cloning. (harvardsciencereview.com)
  • member of Ethical Committee on Animal Experimentation, District Court of Huddinge, Sweden, member of the ISSCR Stem Cell Standards Committee, and member of the Committee on ES cells in the Federation of International Mouse Resources (FIMRE). (isscr.org)
  • Hence could replace the use of embryonic stem cells (ESC), and may overcome the various ethical issues regarding the use of embryos in research and clinics. (frontiersin.org)
  • regenerative medicine
  • Human embryonic stem cells offer the promise of a new regenerative medicine in which damaged adult cells can be replaced with new cells. (jci.org)
  • The aim of this work was to provide, for the first time, a protocol for isolation and characterization of stem cells from porcine amniotic membrane in view of their potential uses in regenerative medicine. (usda.gov)
  • The ability to control the transition from an undifferentiated stem cell to a specific cell fate is one of the key techniques that are required for the application of interventional technologies to regenerative medicine and the treatment of tumors and metastases and of neurodegenerative diseases. (springer.com)
  • Senior Editor of the journal "Regenerative Medicine", Chair of the BioIndustry Association, Regenerative Medicine and Cell Therapy Industry Group, Founder and CEO of the London Regenerative Medicine Network, and Trustee of the UK Stem Cell Foundation. (royalsociety.org)
  • the UK-Israel Science Council, UK Regenerative Medicine Expert Group, the Scientific Advisory Panel of the UK Cell Therapy Catapult, and the Strategic Advisory Board of the Canadian Centre for the Commercialization of Regenerative Medicine. (royalsociety.org)
  • develop into an embryo
  • The combined hybrid egg can develop into an embryo without normal fertilisation, and the EScells can be extracted. (edu.au)
  • This involves transferring the nucleus of a cell of an adult (such as the patient requiring transplant) to an unfertilised egg that has had its nucleus removed, which is then stimulated to develop into an embryo. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • called a blastocyst
  • Within a very short period of time, however, these cells begin to form into a hollow ball of cells called a blastocyst. (google.es)
  • Approximately four days after fertilization and after several cycles of cell division, these totipotent cells begin to specialize, forming a hollow sphere of cells, called a blastocyst. (thailabonline.com)
  • nucleus
  • In this case, each embryo was created by taking a nucleus from a skin cell (donated by Wood and a colleague) and inserting it into a human egg from which the nucleus had been removed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nuclear reprogramming by transfer of an adult cell nucleus. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • This line of reasoning produced a clear experimental test: Replace an egg's nucleus with that of a specialized cell and assess whether the resulting cell could develop into a complete animal. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • If so, a nucleus from a fully differentiated cell retains a complete genome, capable of directing all types of specialization. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • The manipulator is used to remove the nucleus from an egg which is then fused with a cell from a donor animal. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The half egg lacking a nucleus is fused with a donor somatic cell and the fused egg half is fused again with a second enucleate half egg before it is activated (with a mild electric shock) to produce an embryo that is then implanted in a surrogate mother . (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Somatic cell nuclear transfer - the transfer of a cell nucleus from a somatic cell into an egg from which the nucleus has been removed. (thailabonline.com)
  • bovine
  • To explore abnormalities associated with cloning or nuclear transfer (NT) as the most invasive of these methods, we used a bovine model to characterize abnormalities. (jove.com)
  • Bovine clones that survived until the neonatal period differed quantitatively and qualitatively from in-vivo-derived cattle. (jove.com)
  • Additional Mitochondrial DNA Influences the Interactions Between the Nuclear and Mitochondrial Genomes in a Bovine Embryo Model of Nuclear Transfer. (hamiltonthorne.com)
  • mice
  • Depending on the goal of the research, large animals as models of pulmonary disease often resemble the situation of the human lung much better than mice do. (jove.com)
  • Karl Oskar Illmensee studied the cloning and reproduction of fruit flies, mice, and humans in the US and Europe during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. (asu.edu)
  • 1960's Studies of teratocarcinomas in the testes of several inbred strains of mice indicates they originated from embryonic germ cells. (edu.au)
  • As mice embryos develop, they undergo a stage of development called gastrulation. (asu.edu)
  • Alexander Meissner and Rudolf Jaenisch used altered nuclear transfer in mice to create mutant embryos incapable of uterine implantation. (edu.au)
  • And, scientists in Tokyo have shown that cloned mice die significantly earlier than those that are naturally conceived, raising an additional concern that the mutations that accumulate in somatic cells might affect nuclear transfer efficiency and lead to cancer and other diseases in offspring. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • In mice and recently rats, this is accomplished through the use of embryonic stem cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Reprogramming in vertebrates was also proven by the creation of cloned animals from sheep [ 2 ] and mice [ 3 ]. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • Chick Embryo
  • The stages Hamburger and Hamilton assigned were determined by the visible features of the chick embryo. (asu.edu)
  • Researchers
  • NBC News ] Researchers say they have made powerful stem cells from both young and old adults using cloning techniques, and also found clues about why it is so difficult to do this with human beings. (bioethics.net)
  • Using wildtype or engineered stem cell lines, researchers may use this technique to uncover the various mechanisms or treatments that may affect early brain infection and resulting microcephaly in Zika virus-infected embryos. (jove.com)
  • From 1977 to 1987, Harald zur Hausen led a team of researchers across several institutions in Germany to investigate whether the human papillomavirus (HPV) caused cervical cancer. (asu.edu)
  • The researchers concluded that permanent nuclear changes occur as cells specialize. (laskerfoundation.org)
  • The derivation of such cell lines later helped researchers understand the molecular mechanisms governing pluripotency and early embryonic cell fate commitment. (biomedcentral.com)
  • In late 1999, the IVF procedure was carried out, and in early October of 2000, as Time reported, researchers working at the Fairview University Hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota, successfully transferred the stem cells from the newborn's (his name is Adam) umbilical cord to Molly. (apologeticspress.org)
  • Dr. John Rock, a doctor of obstetrics and gynecology in Boston, and Miriam Menkin, Rock s hired lab technician, were the first researchers to fertilize a human egg outside of a human body in February of 1944. (asu.edu)
  • In this meeting, world-leading researchers will describe the way in which new approaches to cell therapy are being provided by our progressively greater understanding of the biology of cells, in particular different populations of stem cells. (royalsociety.org)
  • Biology
  • Barwy Pasażowanie ludzkich embrionalnych komórek macierzystych linii Trypsyna Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard W tym filmie pokazujemy, jak w naszym laboratorium rutynowo fragmenty barwy linii ludzkich zarodkowych komórek macierzystych, z trypsyny. (jove.com)
  • Zamrażanie komórek ES człowieka Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Tutaj pokazujemy, jak w naszym laboratorium zawiesza barwy linii ludzkich zarodkowych komórek macierzystych. (jove.com)
  • Człowieka komórek ES: Kultura Od mrożone komórki Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Tutaj pokazujemy, jak w naszym laboratorium rozpoczyna odcienie ludzkich zarodkowych komórek macierzystych kultury linii mrożonych ręki. (jove.com)
  • Transfer jądra do komórki jajowej myszy Dieter Egli 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Ten film i protokół mają pomóc nauki transfer jądra. (jove.com)
  • Passage TINTEN menselijke embryonale stamcellijnen-lijnen met trypsine Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard In deze video laten we zien hoe onze lab routinematig TINTEN menselijke embryonale stamcellijnen passages met trypsine. (jove.com)
  • Invriezen menselijke embryonale stamcellen Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Hier laten we zien hoe onze lab TINTEN menselijke embryonale stamcellijnen bevriest. (jove.com)
  • Menselijke ES-cellen: Vanaf Cultuur van bevroren cellen Erin Trish 1 , John Dimos 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Hier laten we zien hoe onze lab een TINTEN menselijke embryonale stamcellen lijn cultuur begint met een bevroren voorraad. (jove.com)
  • Nuclear Transfer naar Mouse Eicellen Dieter Egli 1 , Kevin Eggan 1 1 Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Harvard Deze film en het protocol zijn bedoeld om te leren nucleaire transfer. (jove.com)
  • Edmund Beecher Wilson contributed to cell biology, the study of cells, in the US during the end of the nineteenth and the beginning of the twentieth centuries. (asu.edu)
  • His three editions of The Cell in Development and Inheritance (or Heredity) in 1896, 1900, and 1925 introduced generations of students to cell biology. (asu.edu)
  • This lecture will focus on the cell biology of stem cells and the current research on growing and differentiating theses cells. (edu.au)
  • The study of pluripotent stem cells has generated much interest in both biology and medicine. (biomedcentral.com)
  • To engage in this debate, it is important to have an overview of stem cell biology. (jci.org)
  • As we look into the history and science of cloning, we find that it reveals a remarkable flexibility in our biology that could allow us to repair many of the problems that often lead to death. (harvardsciencereview.com)
  • Methods in Cell Biology. (hamiltonthorne.com)
  • Later, working in the Laboratory of Molecular Biology, NINDS, NIH, he studied the functional integration of stem cell-derived neurons into the developing brain. (isscr.org)
  • In biology , cloning is the process of producing similar populations of genetically identical individuals that occurs in nature when organisms such as bacteria , insects , plants or animals reproduce asexually . (readtiger.com)
  • However, a number of other features are needed, and a variety of specialised cloning vectors (small piece of DNA into which a foreign DNA fragment can be inserted) exist that allow protein production , affinity tagging , single stranded RNA or DNA production and a host of other molecular biology tools. (readtiger.com)
  • Regulation
  • The definition proposed in this paper was subsequently adopted by the Australian Parliament in the Prohibition of Human Cloning for Reproduction and Regulation of Human Embryo Research Amendment Act 2006 to replace the previously used definition. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • By initiating suppressive effects through induction of apoptosis, cell senescence, or transient cell-cycle arrest, p53 plays an important role in cancer suppression, developmental regulation, and aging. (asu.edu)
  • Transcription regulation constitutes a major component of biological activities in the cell. (stembook.org)
  • Stem cells are well-suited for the study of transcription regulation and TF function. (stembook.org)
  • The regulation of muscle cell size is a tightly regulated phenomena, and it is a balance between muscle proliferation and degradation of pre-existing proteins. (frontiersin.org)
  • The new Centre covers the full spectrum of research - from basic mechanisms of stem cell regulation, via rigorous translational studies, to clinical trials with stem cells and their derivatives. (royalsociety.org)
  • 2002
  • In 2002, a technique called handmade cloning was introduced, which is cheaper and simpler, without the need for micromanipulation and also works better. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • genome
  • Few interspecies differences do occur, such as time spent at each stage, timing of zygotic genome activation (ZGA) and cell lineage commitment initiation. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The completion of the swine genome will enhance the continued use and development of swine as models of human health, syndromes and conditions. (biomedcentral.com)
  • While the efficiency of cloning still remains low [ 21 ] a complete swine genome will enhance the identification and modification of genes that are relevant to human disease. (biomedcentral.com)
  • The original iPS cell induction system used retroviral vectors, which integrate transgenes into the host genome. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • As expected, iPS cell clones in which transgenes had been integrated into the host genome were frequently observed. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • donor
  • Viable clones were only obtained when the donor and recipient was the same person. (edu.au)
  • laboratory
  • National governments make rules that govern the creation, destruction, and use of embryos in the laboratory-but they do so in profoundly different ways. (scribd.com)
  • When does human life in the laboratory begin and deserve protection? (scribd.com)
  • Given the right conditions in the body or the laboratory, stem cells (unlike muscle cells, nerve cells and or blood cells) can replicate themselves many times over. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • Derivation of embryonic cell lines from laboratory and farm animals (mouse, rabbit, sheep). (edu.pl)
  • As such, they have the ability to divide for indefinite periods in a laboratory culture to produce more stem cells, or to give rise, under specified conditions, to a veritable plethora of other cells. (apologeticspress.org)
  • In addition to leading GlobalStem to becoming a resource for the stem cell research community, his laboratory is engaged in extensive characterization and standardization of stem cell lines. (isscr.org)
  • In 1995, Campbell and his scientific team used cells grown and differentiated in a laboratory to clone sheep for the first time. (asu.edu)
  • scientists
  • Although the possibility of cloning humans had been the subject of speculation for much of the 20th century, scientists and policy makers began to take the prospect seriously in the mid-1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many nations outlawed it, while a few scientists promised to make a clone within the next few years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cloning" is an umbrella term traditionally used by scientists to describe different processes for duplicating biological material. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • But even he concedes that over time there could be pressure to change the law to allow the cloning of people and that scientists may still be pushing to do this. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • The term "stem cell" is used so freely these days in many different forums that it is difficult sometimes understand without context what scientists, politicians, ethicists and commentators are discussing. (edu.au)
  • The term cloning is used by scientists to describe many different processes that involve making duplicates of biological material. (stemcellclinic.net)
  • Although a simple idea, scientists and physicians have struggled for more than 50 years to understand how we can manipulate our cells in order to replace or regenerate our bodies. (harvardsciencereview.com)
  • mammal
  • Amniocentesis A procedure for obtaining foetal cells for prenatal diagnosis by sampling theamniotic fluid from a pregnant mammal. (bioexpoonline.com)
  • research
  • In Embryo Politics , Thomas Banchoff provides a comprehensive overview of political struggles aboutembryo research during four decades in four countries-the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany, and France. (scribd.com)
  • Embryo research is one of the few political issues with no historical precedent. (scribd.com)
  • Much of the hope invested in embryonic stem (ES) cell research surrounds its promise to provide a broad spectrum of medical applications. (stembook.org)
  • This report discusses issues regarding stem cell research. (unt.edu)
  • With certain restrictions, the President has announced that federal funds may be used to conduct research on human embryonic stem cells. (unt.edu)
  • The team, at Massachusetts-based Advanced Cell Technology and the Institute for Stem Cell Research in Los Angeles, say they used the cloning methods to create the stem cells to match a 35-year-old man and a 75-year-old man. (bioethics.net)
  • The NHMRC Embryo Research Licensing Committee (NHMRC Licensing Committee) developed this discussion paper in response to a request from the Council of the NHMRC for a definition of 'human embryo' from a purely biological standpoint. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • Some have gone to great lengths to educate themselves including taking trips overseas to talk with the latest adult stem cell research. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • In the end though the debate is quite a simple one, and is based on the value our representatives put on human life or in permitting scientific research at any cost. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • On the other hand proponents for change argue instead that embryos may have to be sacrificed for the sake of research which could lead to major breakthroughs in a host of diseases and ailments. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • The research was strictly limited to embryos which had been produced during the IVF program - a program intended to result in birth, but which were going to be destroyed anyway. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • The current debate is about how the embryonic stem cells used in research are derived," he wrote. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • A further fear is that a green light now for embryonic cloning research will merely be a stepping stone towards a more open slather approach in future years. (newsweekly.com.au)
  • In 2007, the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority in London, UK, published Hybrids and Chimeras: A Report on the Findings of the Consultation, which summarized a public debate about research on, and suggested policy for, human animal chimeras. (asu.edu)
  • On 9 August 2001, US President George W. Bush gave an eleven-minute speech from his ranch in Crawford, Texas, on the ethics and fate of federal funding for stem cell research. (asu.edu)
  • Bush also announced the creation of a special council to oversee stem cell research. (asu.edu)
  • In the speech President Bush acknowledged the importance of issues surrounding stem cell research to many Americans, presented different arguments in favor of and opposing embryonic stem cell research, and explained his decision to limit but not completely eliminate potential federal funding for embryonic stem cell (ESC) research. (asu.edu)
  • The research shows it is possible to derive embryonic stem cells from primates, including humans. (edu.au)
  • 2001 US President George W. Bush authorises selected ES cell lines to be used for human research, however other cell lines are not allowed. (edu.au)
  • The first human embryonic stem (hES) cell bank was officially opened in the UK in May 2004 , with Health Minister Lord Warner saying, "This potentially revolutionary research could benefit thousands of patients. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • The centre contains just two stem cell lines developed by research teams at King s College London and the Centre for Life in Newcastle. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • Research and clinical findings since have borne out all our objections to ES cells, as well as the promises of adult stem cells. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • There is simply no case for supporting research in hES cells any longer. (i-sis.org.uk)
  • This has led to an intense debate that threatens to limit embryonic stem cell research. (jci.org)
  • A stem cell is defined by two properties (see A stem cell research lexicon ). (jci.org)
  • Posts in this category pertain to abortion, human cloning, embryonic stem cell research, and other issues pertaining to the advancement of the culture of life and to the respect and protection of the sanctity of life. (chipbennett.net)
  • Nissim Benvenisty M.D., Ph.D. , is the Herbert Cohn Chair in Cancer Research and the director of the Stem Cell Unit at the Hebrew University. (isscr.org)
  • The Mission of the Centre is to develop new treatments for human disease through innovative research with stem cells. (royalsociety.org)
  • Recent published reports on the isolation and successful culturing of the first human pluripotent stem cell lines have generated great excitement and have brought biomedical research to the edge of a new frontier. (thailabonline.com)
  • development
  • Diagram of the ways to reprogram cells along with the development of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recording and contextualizing the science of embryos, development, and reproduction. (asu.edu)
  • Stem cells occur at all stages of human development, from embryo to adult but their versatility and numbers tend to decrease with age. (nhmrc.gov.au)
  • He helped show how each part of the cell works during cell division and in every step of early development of an organism. (asu.edu)
  • Our results provide a resource for pluripotent stem cell engineering and for understanding pig development. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Background information can also be found at UNSW Embryology Stem Cells and Week 1 Development . (edu.au)
  • Wilson shook apart the cells at early stages of embryonic development, and he observed the development of the isolated cells. (asu.edu)
  • He observed that in the normal development of Amphioxus, all three main types of symmetry, or cleavage patterns observed in embryos, could be found. (asu.edu)
  • Humans inherit mitochondria from their mothers, and mechanisms have evolved to eliminate sperm mitochondria in early embryonic development. (asu.edu)
  • They studied when and where in developing limbs many cells die, and they studied the functions of cell death in wing development. (asu.edu)
  • They are best described in the context of normal human development. (thailabonline.com)
  • Human development begins when a sperm fertilizes an egg and creates a single cell that has the potential to form an entire organism. (thailabonline.com)
  • He introduced cellular nuclear transfer technology to the Chinese biological community, developed methods to clone organisms from many marine species, and investigated the role of cytoplasm in early development. (asu.edu)