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  • colorectal
  • The study examined the relation between body mass index (BMI) and colorectal cancer incidence in a prospective cohort of 307,708 men and 209,436 women ages 50-71. (aarp.org)
  • These cancers include: breast, ovarian esophageal, colorectal liver, pancreatic gallbladder, stomach endometrial, cervical prostate, kidney non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, multiple myeloma A high body mass index (BMI) is associated with a higher risk of developing ten common cancers including 41% of uterine cancers and at least 10% of gallbladder, kidney, liver and colon cancers in the UK. (wikipedia.org)
  • insulin resistance
  • Gene expression promoted by a diet of fat and glucose, as well as high levels of inflammation related cytokines found in the obese, can result in cells that "produce fewer and smaller mitochondria than is normal," and are thus prone to insulin resistance. (wikipedia.org)
  • 0.05
  • Information regarding self-perceived body weight, health perception and socio-demographic data was collected using a questionnaire and compared with measured BMI (Pearson's Chi square test, p ≤ 0.05). (gre.ac.uk)
  • risk
  • In conclusion, among older adults, DM risk factors were differentially associated with DM preceded predominantly by IR or β-cell dysfunction. (nih.gov)
  • A study in June 2003 issue of "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" reports an attempt to determine whether rapid weight gain in early infancy is a risk factor for development of obesity in blacks. (lsuagcenter.com)
  • Researchers in the United States have not conducted many large-scale studies examining the relationship between body weight or body mass index and asthma risk. (webwire.com)
  • Even moderate BMI was related to higher risk of colon cancer, suggesting that the optimal strategy for prevention would be to maintain a weight as low as possible within the healthy range (18.5 to 25 BMI units). (aarp.org)
  • A self-reported standardized tool was created by a Yale researcher, Ashley Gearhardt, to determine those individuals at high risk for food addiction, regardless of weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • Those who are obese during pregnancy have a greater risk of have a child with a number of congenital malformations including: neural tube defects such as anencephaly and spina bifida, cardiovascular anomalies, including septal anomalies, cleft lip and palate, anorectal malformation, limb reduction anomalies, and hydrocephaly. (wikipedia.org)
  • The risk of carpal tunnel syndrome rises 7.4% for each 1 kg/m2 increase of body mass index. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main criticism was that confounding variables such as environmental factors could attribute to many of the chronic diseases such that low birth weight alone should not be dictated as an independent risk factor. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is defined by body mass index (BMI) and further evaluated in terms of fat distribution via the waist-hip ratio and total cardiovascular risk factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • infant
  • This may eventually lead to changes in recommendations for infant feeding practices, and more stringent follow-up on weight gain by practicing pediatricians. (lsuagcenter.com)
  • We investigated the relationships of maternal body mass index (BMI) and fat mass with childhood wheeze, and examined the influences of infant weight gain and childhood obesity. (bmj.com)
  • Ideally, the rate of weight gain should be monitored during pregnancy to support the most ideal infant development. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, it is important to maintain a healthy gestational weight gain throughout pregnancy for achieving the optimal infant birth weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the same token, if the fetus growing in the womb of a healthy mother is exposed to prolonged famine after birth, the infant would be less adaptive to the harsh environment than low-birth-weight babies. (wikipedia.org)
  • older adults
  • This effect has been observed across both genders and across multiple age groups, although there is some evidence that it may be most pronounced in adolescence and diminished among older adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • glycemic index
  • In this study, a healthy diet was defined as one high in fiber, with a high polyunsaturated to saturated fat ratio, lower trans fats consumption, and a lower mean glycemic index. (wikipedia.org)
  • Others question the usefulness of the glycemic index and recommend high-GI foods like potatoes and rice. (wikipedia.org)
  • loss
  • This study aims to appraise bariatric surgery vs. non-surgical weight-loss (medical, behavioural and lifestyle) interventions in IIH management. (springer.com)
  • Whilst both bariatric surgery and non-surgical weight loss offer significant beneficial effects on IIH symptomatology, future studies should address the lack of prospective and randomised trials to establish the optimal role for these interventions. (springer.com)
  • Although there is also evidence suggesting that non-surgical interventions, including a recent multicentre RCT of weight loss vs. weight loss with acetazolamide [ 16 ], may improve IIH outcomes via weight reduction and possibly additional mechanisms, there are lack of studies directly comparing these treatment strategies. (springer.com)
  • The aim of this paper was therefore to systematically review the current evidence and concomitantly appraise both bariatric surgery and non-surgical weight-loss interventions in the management of IIH, via the assessment of visual outcomes (papilloedema and visual field deficits), symptoms (headache), intracranial pressure (via cerebrospinal fluid opening pressure measurement) and BMI as summary outcome parameters. (springer.com)
  • The gel pieces increase the volume and elasticity of the stomach and small intestine contents, contributing to a feeling of fullness and inducing weight loss. (businesswire.com)
  • Data from the PLENITY pivotal study, Gelesis Loss Of Weight (GLOW), were published recently in the scientific journal Obesity and that paper was selected as an Editor's Choice manuscript. (businesswire.com)
  • The effect of a dietary supplement (N-oleyl-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine and epigallocatechin gallate) on dietary compliance and body fat loss in adults who are overweight: a double-blind, randomized control trial. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Embolization of the left gastric artery (LGA), which preferentially supplies the gastric fundus, has been shown to produce weight loss in animal models. (hindawi.com)
  • However, weight loss after LGA embolization in humans has not been previously established. (hindawi.com)
  • The aim of this study was to evaluate postprocedural weight loss in patients following LGA embolization. (hindawi.com)
  • Postprocedural weight loss in this group was compared to a control group of patients who had undergone embolization of other arteries for upper GI bleeding. (hindawi.com)
  • To further explore the possibility that a catheter-directed approach may provide a minimally invasive therapeutic alternative for obesity, we performed a single-center retrospective review of patients who underwent LGA embolization to determine whether this intervention led to weight loss. (hindawi.com)
  • Calculate the body mass index and calories needed for weight loss or maintenance. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Identify the 2 major weight-loss medications used in the United States. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • Explain how bariatric surgery contributes to weight loss. (pharmacytimes.com)
  • In addition to weight loss and exercise there are some behavioral changes that can improve stress incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • Weight loss surgery in those with obesity is sometimes an effective measure in those with type 2 DM. (wikipedia.org)
  • Weight loss can either occur unintentionally due to malnourishment or an underlying disease or arise from a conscious effort to improve an actual or perceived overweight or obese state. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unexplained" weight loss that is not caused by reduction in calorific intake or exercise is called cachexia and may be a symptom of a serious medical condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • not in citation given] Weight loss occurs when the body is expending more energy in work and metabolism than it is absorbing from food or other nutrients. (wikipedia.org)
  • It will then use stored reserves from fat or muscle, gradually leading to weight loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • For athletes seeking to improve performance or to meet required weight classification for participation in a sport, it is not uncommon to seek additional weight loss even if they are already at their ideal body weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • The healthiest weight loss regimen, therefore, is one that consists of a balanced diet and moderate physical activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The least intrusive weight loss methods, and those most often recommended, are adjustments to eating patterns and increased physical activity, generally in the form of exercise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other methods of weight loss include use of drugs and supplements that decrease appetite, block fat absorption, or reduce stomach volume. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diets to promote weight loss can be categorized as: low-fat, low-carbohydrate, low-calorie, very low calorie and more recently flexible dieting. (wikipedia.org)
  • A meta-analysis of six randomized controlled trials found no difference between low-calorie, low-carbohydrate, and low-fat diets, with a 2-4 kilogram weight loss over 12-18 months in all studies. (wikipedia.org)
  • At two years, all calorie-reduced diet types cause equal weight loss irrespective of the macronutrients emphasized. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other studies have found that the average individual maintains some weight loss after dieting. (wikipedia.org)
  • In his 1863 pamphlet, Letter on Corpulence, Addressed to the Public, he outlined the details of a particular low-carbohydrate, low-calorie diet that had led to his own dramatic weight loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • A meta-analysis of 16 trials of 2-12 months' duration found that low-fat diets (without intentional restriction of caloric intake) resulted in average weight loss of 3.2 kg (7.1 lb) over habitual eating. (wikipedia.org)
  • Low-calorie diets usually produce an energy deficit of 500-1,000 calories per day, which can result in a 0.5 to 1 kilogram (1.1 to 2.2 pounds) weight loss per week. (wikipedia.org)
  • They subject the body to starvation and produce an average loss of 1.5-2.5 kg (3.3-5.5 lb) per week. (wikipedia.org)
  • A second prevention approach may be weight loss for those who are overweight or obese. (wikipedia.org)
  • Americans
  • More than 150 million Americans struggle with excess or unhealthy weight. (businesswire.com)
  • Why are Americans gaining so much weight? (pharmacytimes.com)
  • According to the Dietary Guidelines for Americans those who achieve and manage a healthy weight do so most successfully by being careful to consume just enough calories to meet their needs, and being physically active. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • Prior studies suggest that weight satisfaction may preclude changes in behavior that lead to healthier weight among individuals who are overweight or obese. (hindawi.com)
  • The incidence of overweight and obese individuals in the United States has dramatically increased over the last twenty years and now includes nearly two-thirds of adults [ 1 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • Due to the gastrointestinal tract's role in body weight regulation, gastroenterologists should work closely with other medical disciplines to oversee and coordinate the care of obese individuals, according to an American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute Obesity Task Force Report. (eurekalert.org)
  • Gut Hormones and Appetite Control" - Stephen R. Bloom, MD, Imperial College of London and colleagues review the role played by gut hormones in appetite and weight by regulating when and how much individuals eat for every meal. (eurekalert.org)
  • However, it ignores variations between individuals in amounts of lean body mass, particularly muscle mass. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Depression, stress or boredom may also contribute to weight increase,[citation needed] and in these cases, individuals are advised to seek medical help. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), healthy individuals seeking to maintain their weight should consume 2,000 calories (8.4 MJ) per day. (wikipedia.org)
  • lower
  • Third, birth weight for black babies is lower than white babies and may result in rapid catch-up growth in early infancy. (lsuagcenter.com)
  • Using Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) subjects regardless of Body mass index(BMI), with high food addiction score compared to those with lower scores, showed significant differences in brain activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • On the other hand, insufficient consumption will result in lower birth weight. (wikipedia.org)
  • metabolism
  • Consequently, the baby adapts by changing its body size and metabolism to prepare for harsh conditions of food shortages after birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Patients were required to have three separate weights recorded in the electronic medical record (EMR) which consisted of (1) preembolization body weight recorded within the four weeks prior to the procedure, (2) an early postembolization weight recorded within the first 3 months after the procedure, and (3) a delayed postembolization weight recorded at least 3 months after the procedure. (hindawi.com)
  • Clinical research published in the British Medical Journal compared pelvic floor exercises, vaginal weights and electro-stimulation in a randomised trial. (wikipedia.org)
  • chronic
  • Given the complexity of the disease of obesity and the need for expanded treatment options, the Obesity Action Coalition is encouraged to see continued innovation in safe and effective chronic weight management options. (businesswire.com)
  • subject's
  • BMI is defined as the subject's weight divided by the square of their height and is calculated as follows. (wikipedia.org)
  • B M I = m h 2 {\displaystyle \mathrm {BMI} ={\frac {m}{h^{2}}}} , where m and h are the subject's weight and height respectively. (wikipedia.org)