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  • symptoms
  • Common symptoms are sudden and transient, and include unilateral paresis, speech disturbance, and monocular blindness. (aafp.org)
  • Urgent evaluation is necessary in patients with symptoms of transient ischemic attack and includes neuroimaging, cervicocephalic vasculature imaging, cardiac evaluation, blood pressure assessment, and routine laboratory testing. (aafp.org)
  • Over the past 10 years, transient ischemic attack (TIA) has been redefined multiple times to reflect the transient nature of not only the symptoms, but also cerebral ischemia. (aafp.org)
  • 1 , 2 In 2002, the TIA Working Group redefined TIA as brief neurologic dysfunction with symptoms typically lasting less than one hour, without evidence of acute infarction. (aafp.org)
  • paresis
  • Here we report the case of an 80-year-old man who presented with transient paresis and sensory loss in the right arm. (hindawi.com)
  • subarachnoid
  • The phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium enhancement in the subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. (hindawi.com)
  • The hyperintense acute reperfusion marker (HARM) describes a hyperintense signal in the subarachnoid space on postcontrast fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images and has initially been described in acute ischemic stroke [ 6 , 7 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • The HARM phenomenon is caused by blood-brain barrier disruption following acute recanalization and reperfusion and consecutive delayed gadolinium contrast enhancement in the subarachnoid space [ 10 ]. (hindawi.com)
  • dysfunction
  • 3 This led to the 2009 revision by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association (AHA/ASA), which now defines TIA as a transient episode of neurologic dysfunction caused by focal cerebral, spinal cord, or retinal ischemia, without acute infarction. (aafp.org)
  • identify
  • Where there are differences between the recommendations made within this acute stroke and TIA guideline and the NSS, the Guideline Development Group ( GDG ) members feel that their recommendations are derived from systematic methodology to identify all of the relevant literature. (nih.gov)