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  • ischemic
  • In addition to limb ischemia, other organs can become ischemic, causing: Renal ischemia (nephric ischemia) Mesenteric ischemia Cerebral ischemia Cardiac ischemia In order to treat acute limb ischaemia there are a series of things that can be done to determine where the occlusion is located, the severity, and what the cause was. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute abdomen of the ischemic variety is usually due to: A thromboembolism from the left side of the heart, such as may be generated during atrial fibrillation, occluding the SMA. (wikipedia.org)
  • Primary mesenteric vein thromboses may also cause ischemic acute abdomen, usually precipitated by hypercoagulable states such as polycythemia vera. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute ischemic abdomen is a surgical emergency. (wikipedia.org)
  • antibiotics
  • There are efforts to decrease the use of antibiotics in acute bronchitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evidence does not support the general use of antibiotics in acute bronchitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotics are the first line of treatment in acute prostatitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Antibiotics usually resolve acute prostatitis infections in a very short time, however a minimum of two to four weeks of therapy is recommended to eradicate the offending organism completely. (wikipedia.org)
  • Advanced age (average patient aged 57 years old) Male sex (4 to 1 male dominance) Cirrhosis AIDS Herpes virus Atrial fibrilation Diabetes (currently the most prevalent out of all conditions in patients) Aortic dissection Anti-cardiolipin antibodies CMV infection Herpetic infection Hyperglycemia Hypersensitivity to broad-spectrum antibiotics Hypothermia Ischemia Gastric volvulus Posterior mediastinal haematoma Septic shock Steven Johnson syndrome Acute esophageal necrosis can only be diagnosed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • The FP-1201-lyo treatment for acute lung injury is now in the 3rd phase of clinical trials and is anticipated to obtain European marketing authorization in the near future. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Traditionally, the use of opiates or other painkillers in patients with an acute abdomen has been discouraged before the clinical examination, because these would alter the examination. (wikipedia.org)
  • toxicity
  • Acute toxicity describes the adverse effects of a substance that result either from a single exposure or from multiple exposures in a short period of time (usually less than 24 hours). (wikipedia.org)
  • To be described as acute toxicity, the adverse effects should occur within 14 days of the administration of the substance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Otherwise, most acute toxicity data comes from animal testing or, more recently, in vitro testing methods and inference from data on similar substances. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limits for short-term exposure, such as STELs or CVs, are defined only if there is a particular acute toxicity associated with a substance. (wikipedia.org)
  • cholecystitis
  • Acute cholecystitis is inflammation of the gallbladder. (www.nhs.uk)
  • They don't usually cause symptoms, but they can occasionally cause episodes of pain (biliary colic) or acute cholecystitis. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Acute cholecystitis is potentially serious. (www.nhs.uk)
  • It's important for acute cholecystitis to be diagnosed as soon as possible as there's a risk serious complications could develop if it isn't treated promptly. (www.nhs.uk)
  • What causes acute cholecystitis? (www.nhs.uk)
  • The causes of acute cholecystitis can be grouped into two main categories: calculous cholecystitis and acalculous cholecystitis. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Calculous cholecystitis is the most common, and usually less serious, type of acute cholecystitis. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Acalculous cholecystitis is a less common, but usually more serious, type of acute cholecystitis. (www.nhs.uk)
  • If your symptoms suggest you have acute cholecystitis, your GP will refer you to hospital immediately for further tests and treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • If you're diagnosed with acute cholecystitis, you'll probably need to be admitted to hospital for treatment. (www.nhs.uk)
  • After initial treatment, any gallstones that may have caused acute cholecystitis usually fall back into the gallbladder and the inflammation will often settle down. (www.nhs.uk)
  • Removing your gallbladder may be recommended at some point after initial treatment to prevent acute cholecystitis recurring and reduce your risk of developing potentially serious complications. (www.nhs.uk)
  • necrosis
  • Acute tubular necrosis ( ATN ) is a medical condition involving the death of tubular epithelial cells that form the renal tubules of the kidneys . (wikipedia.org)
  • The two types of acute pancreatitis are mild and severe, which are defined based on whether the predominant response to cell injury is inflammation (mild) or necrosis (severe). (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN), also known as Gurvits syndrome, black esophagus, acute necrotizing esophagitis, and esophageal infarction is a rare esophageal disorder. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute esophageal necrosis made an appearance on an American medical drama show, Dr. G: Medical Examiner. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute esophageal necrosis was first described by Goldenberg et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Acute bronchitis, also known as a chest cold, is short-term inflammation of the bronchi (large and medium-sized airways) of the lungs. (wikipedia.org)
  • In acute prostatitis, penetration of the prostate is not as important as for category II because the intense inflammation disrupts the prostate-blood barrier. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute pericarditis is a type of pericarditis (inflammation of the sac surrounding the heart, the pericardium) usually lasting less than 6 weeks[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • The elevation of these substances may occur when inflammation of the heart's muscular layer in addition to acute pericarditis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Electrocardiogram (ECG) changes in acute pericarditis mainly indicates inflammation of the epicardium (the layer directly surrounding the heart), since the fibrous pericardium is electrically inert. (wikipedia.org)
  • renal
  • The inflammatory response leads to the secondary manifestations of pancreatitis: hypovolemia from capillary permeability, acute respiratory distress syndrome, disseminated intravascular coagulations, renal failure, cardiovascular failure, and gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • citation needed] Acute bronchitis can be caused by contagious pathogens, most commonly viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] In the Netherlands, the Dutch Acute Medicine (DAM) society was formed in 2012 and held its first Congress on 28 September 2012 in the VU University Medical Center in Amsterdam. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Formed in 2000, SAM was established at a time when the concepts of acute medicine and the Acute Medical Unit (AMU) were in their infancy. (wikipedia.org)
  • sepsis
  • A prostate massage should never be done in a patient with suspected acute prostatitis, since it may induce sepsis. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulmonary
  • Acute lung injury, a common condition characterized by acute severe hypoxia without evidence of hydrostatic pulmonary edema, remains a key source of mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Currently, mechanical ventilation remains the therapeutic mainstay for pulmonary dysfunction following acute inhalation injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • episodes
  • Familial mediterranean fever and TNF receptor associated periodic syndrome are rare inherited autoimmune diseases capable of causing recurring episodes of acute pericarditis. (wikipedia.org)
  • diffuse
  • Typical EKG changes in acute pericarditis includes stage 1 -- diffuse, positive, ST elevations with reciprocal ST depression in aVR and V1. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgical
  • Acute care services are generally delivered by teams of health care professionals from a range of medical and surgical specialties. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute hospitals are those intended for short-term medical and/or surgical treatment and care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • Potential treatment methods such as statin therapy and nutritional strategies are also expected to gain more focus from research bodies operating in the area of treatment of acute lung injury. (tmrresearch.com)
  • This report presents a detailed overview of the present scope of growth for companies operating in the global acute lung injury treatment market. (tmrresearch.com)
  • The market intelligence report is a comprehensive review of the growth trail in terms of current, historical, and future scenarios of the global acute lung injury treatment market. (tmrresearch.com)
  • The report probes into the strategies related to marketing, shares, and product portfolio of the key participants operating in the global acute lung injury treatment market. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Acute sacroiliitis can rarely be also related to hematological malignancies or treatment with isotretinoin. (springer.com)
  • Awareness to the possibility of acute sacroiliitis and a thorough physical examination are the necessary prerequisites to its timely diagnosis, while the appropriate laboratory and imaging studies should confirm the precise diagnosis and direct the appropriate treatment strategy. (springer.com)
  • The acute treatment of anaphylaxis, pathophysiology, and other related topics are reviewed separately. (uptodate.com)
  • Acute care is a branch of secondary health care where a patient receives active but short-term treatment for a severe injury or episode of illness, an urgent medical condition, or during recovery from surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Acute care settings include but are not limited to: emergency department, intensive care, coronary care, cardiology, neonatal intensive care, and many general areas where the patient could become acutely unwell and require stabilization and transfer to another higher dependency unit for further treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • If this indicates acute heart damage (elevation in the ST segment, new left bundle branch block), treatment for a heart attack in the form of angioplasty or thrombolysis is indicated immediately (see below). (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammatory
  • Acute lung injury is a part of the systemic inflammatory process where the lung demonstrates symptoms similar to other tissues such as extravascation of protein rich fluid, destruction in capillary endothelium, and interstitial edema. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Acute pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory condition of the pancreas that can extend to extrapancreatic tissues. (clevelandclinicmeded.com)
  • A hallmark of acute pancreatitis is a manifestation of the inflammatory response, namely the recruitment of neutrophils to the pancreas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The other 10-20% of acute pericarditis cases have various causes including connective tissue diseases (e.g., systemic lupus erythematosus), cancer, or involve an inflammatory reaction of the pericardium following trauma to the heart such as after a heart attack such as Dressler's syndrome. (wikipedia.org)
  • lung injury
  • It has been observed that even in patients who survive acute lung injury, the quality of life is adversely affected in the long term. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Acute lung injury (ALI) is a medical disorder with concentrated oxygenation capacity of the lungs in spite of administering oxygen in high concentrations. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Acute lung injury (ALI) remains an important cause of illness and mortality among the critically ill patient population. (tmrresearch.com)
  • As augmented vascular leakage is a principal occurrence in the acute lung injury and thus, therapies are being targeted towards decreasing the leakage. (tmrresearch.com)
  • Faron Pharmaceuticals, Ltd. is at present engaged in the development of pharmacological treatments for acute lung injury with the help of a consortium consisting European Commission, Traumakine program (University College London Hospital (UCLH) and University of Torino and University of Turku). (tmrresearch.com)
  • Depending on the type and amount of irritant gas inhaled, victims can experience symptoms ranging from minor respiratory discomfort to acute airway and lung injury and even death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe exposure may result in changes in upper and lower airways resulting in an acute lung injury, which may not be present until several hours after exposure. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnoses
  • Acute medicine is distinct from the broader field of emergency medicine, which is concerned with the management of all people attending the emergency department, not just those with internal medicine diagnoses. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Men with acute prostatitis often have chills, fever, pain in the lower back, perineum, or genital area, urinary frequency and urgency often at night, burning or painful urination, body aches, and a demonstrable infection of the urinary tract, as evidenced by white blood cells and bacteria in the urine. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is more important to choose a bactericidal antibiotic (kills bacteria, e.g., a fluoroquinolone antibiotic) rather than a bacteriostatic antibiotic (slows bacterial growth, e.g. tetracycline) for acute potentially life-threatening infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • inhalation
  • Acute inhalation injury may result from frequent and widespread use of household cleaning agents and industrial gases (including chlorine and ammonia). (wikipedia.org)
  • chest pain
  • For example, according to a randomized controlled trial, males having chest pain with normal or non diagnostic ECG are at higher risk for having acute coronary syndrome than women. (wikipedia.org)
  • This particular study had an 8.4% prevalence of acute coronary syndrome, which means the positive predictive value of being a male with chest pain and having coronary syndrome is 9.6% and negative predictive value is 93.2% ( click here[permanent dead link] to adjust these results for patients at higher or lower risk of acute coronary syndrome). (wikipedia.org)
  • accent
  • The acute accent ( ´ ) is a diacritic used in many modern written languages with alphabets based on the Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek scripts. (wikipedia.org)
  • An early precursor of the acute accent was the apex, used in Latin inscriptions to mark long vowels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acute accent was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, where it indicated a syllable with a high pitch. (wikipedia.org)
  • In Modern Greek, a stress accent has replaced the pitch accent, and the acute marks the stressed syllable of a word. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, Bulgarian usually uses the grave accent to mark the vowel in a stressed syllable, unlike Russian, which uses the acute accent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Stress is irregular in Russian, and in reference and teaching materials (dictionaries and books for children or foreigners), stress is indicated by an acute accent above the stressed vowel. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acute accent can be used both in the Cyrillic and sometimes in the romanised text. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some loanwords, mainly from French, are also written with the acute accent, such as Norwegian and Swedish kafé and Danish café (also cafe). (wikipedia.org)
  • Welsh: word stress usually falls on the penultimate syllable, but one way of indicating stress on a final (short) vowel is by the use of the acute accent. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acute accent marks the height of some stressed vowels in various Romance languages. (wikipedia.org)
  • The acute accent (sometimes called accento chiuso, "closed accent" in Italian) is compulsory only in words of more than one syllable stressed on their final vowel (and a few other words). (wikipedia.org)
  • Words ending in stressed -o are never marked with an acute accent (ó), but with a grave accent (ò). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospitals
  • The 2009 "Final Report of the Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals", known as The Garling Report, documented a series of high-profile medical controversies in the New South Wales public hospital system, and issued over one hundred recommendations that stimulated considerable discussion and controversy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Final Report of the Special Commission of Inquiry into Acute Care Services in NSW Public Hospitals, November 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • It developed in the United Kingdom in the early 2000s as a dedicated field of medicine, together with the establishment of acute medical units in numerous hospitals. (wikipedia.org)
  • edema
  • Compartment syndrome can occur because of acute limb ischaemia because of the biotoxins that accumulate distal to the occlusion resulting in edema. (wikipedia.org)
  • concentrations
  • Surprisingly, this analysis revealed that acute exposure to solvent vapors at concentrations below those associated with long-term effects appears to increase the risk of a fatal automobile accident. (wiktionary.org)
  • Causes
  • Acute flaccid myelitis (AFM) is a condition that affects the nervous system, specifically the spinal cord, which can result from a variety of causes including viral infections. (cdc.gov)
  • There are several causes of acute pericarditis. (wikipedia.org)