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  • inhibitory
  • There are two types of inhibitory receptors: Ionotropic receptors (also known as ligand-gated ion channels) play an important role in inhibitory postsynaptic potentials. (wikipedia.org)
  • hyperpolarization
  • From measurements of the speed of an action potential, hyperpolarization must have a further component of which the 'soliton' mechanical pulse is the only candidate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Often times, the potassium will efflux enough to cause a hyperpolarization (meaning that the inside of the cell is more negative than what it's resting potential was). (omninoggin.com)
  • neural
  • Venki Murthy ( venk at u.washington.edu ) PS: You may also wish to consult the literature on template matching for action potential recognition - usually applied to neural recordings. (bio.net)
  • An all-or-none electrical event (neural impulse) in an axon or muscle fibre in which the polarity of the membrane potential is rapidly reversed and re-established. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • the goal is not to reproduce the experimental data, but to understand qualitatively the role of action potentials in neural circuits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Both types of models may be used to understand the behavior of small biological neural networks, such as the central pattern generators responsible for some automatic reflex actions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ionic Basis
  • You just viewed The Ionic Basis for the Action... . (merlot.org)
  • If you know the author of The Ionic Basis for the Action Potential , please help us out by filling out the form below and clicking Send. (merlot.org)
  • Alan Hodgkin and Andrew Huxley also employed the squid giant axon (1939) and by 1952 they had obtained a full quantitative description of the ionic basis of the action potential, leading the formulation of the Hodgkin-Huxley model. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • In the generation of the action potential, stimulation of the cell by neurotransmitters or by sensory receptor cells partially opens channel-shaped protein molecules in the membrane. (britannica.com)
  • It is shown by microelectrode measurements that, besides the sensory cells, all the major tissues of the trap lobes are excitable, firing action potentials with pronounced after-hyperpolarizations. (springer.com)
  • The resting potentials of sensory cells (-161±7 mV) and mesophyll cells (-155±8 mV) are of the same magnitude. (springer.com)
  • muscle fibre
  • Sometimes called a propagated potential because a wave of excitation is actively transmitted along the nerve or muscle fibre, an action potential is conducted at speeds that range from 1 to 100 metres (3 to 300 feet) per second, depending on the properties of the fibre and its environment . (britannica.com)
  • Compound
  • Patients that suffer from critical illness myopathy , which is a frequent cause of weakness seen in patients in hospital intensive care units , have prolonged compound muscle action potential. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • Nearly all cell membranes in animals, plants and fungi maintain a voltage difference between the exterior and interior of the cell, called the membrane potential . (wikipedia.org)
  • This action potential passes along the cell membrane causing the cell to contract, therefore the activity of the SAN results in a resting heart rate of roughly 60-100 beats per minute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another important ion is calcium (Ca2+), which can be found outside of the cell as well as inside the cell, in a calcium store known as the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). Release of Ca2+ from the SR, via a process called calcium-induced calcium release, is vital for the plateau phase of the action potential (see phase 2, below) and is a fundamental step in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note: The influx of sodium into the cell will bring the potential in the cell to about 35-40mV (see picture). (omninoggin.com)