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  • legumes
  • Plant foods such as legumes, nuts, leafy greens and dried fruit supply non-heme iron, a form that's less well absorbed. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • For starters, eat some of your foods cooked (e.g. leafy green vegetables), sprouted (e.g. breads, grains and legumes) and fermented (e.g. tempeh), since these preparation methods release iron from phytates. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • 11.0
  • The most important factors known to be associated with this condition are socio-economic status, poor diet, poor sanitation and various infections and infestations .Anaemia in pregnancy is defined as a haemoglobin level of less than 11.0g/dl and iron-deficiency contributes significantly to this, especially among women of south eastern Nigeria . (indmedica.com)
  • excess
  • Background: Whether infants regulate copper absorption and the potential effects of excess copper in early life remain poorly defined. (uchile.cl)
  • Now we know that excess iron can be very harmful, and that very few people should supplement it: women who are pregnant may need it, and perimenopausal women who are bleeding heavily month after month may become anemic and need it. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • What is it about iron that makes it so essential to health, and yet dangerous in excess? (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • The liver and spleen are the normal storage sites for excess iron. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • Excess iron leads to a number of undesirable conditions such as enlarged liver and cirrhosis, diabetes, hypogonadism and atrophy of the testes, joint degeneration, heart disease, dusty brown skin pigmentation and death usually due to cancer of the colon or liver. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • Excess iron is toxic to cells and creates oxidation reactions, often stimulating the growth of cancers due to other causes. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • Excess iron can result from a genetic hemochromatosis abnormality, which occurs in approximately 4 percent of adults, albeit to varying levels of risk. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • deficient
  • People who are iron deficient (anemic) are often pale, irritable, and tire easily. (virginiahopkinstestkits.com)
  • Iron deficient anaemia, a low status of iron and red blood cells in the body, can lead to fatigue, shortened attention span, irritability and decreased performance. (ehow.co.uk)
  • I am iron deficient. (theglobeandmail.com)
  • Female runners are particularly at risk of being deficient in iron, but what are the symptoms and what should you do if you're worried you're at risk? (runnersworld.com)
  • If you are worried, a simple bloodtest can confirm whether or not you're deficient in iron, so visit your GP for a check up. (runnersworld.com)
  • Are female runners more at risk of being iron deficient? (runnersworld.com)
  • susceptibility
  • Neckmar said women represented a significant market for the product given there susceptibility to iron deficiency and anaemia as well as their increasing familiarity with probiotics for other women's health issues like vaginal health. (nutraingredients.com)
  • regulates
  • The analysis of a range of human iron loading disorders has provided very strong evidence that the products of the HFE, TfR2, hepcidin and hemojuvelin genes comprise integral components of the machinery that regulates iron absorption and iron traffic around the body. (springer.com)
  • The body regulates itself to help keep iron stores in balance, avoiding iron deficiency or toxicity. (ehow.co.uk)
  • anaemia
  • Iron-deficiency anaemia is one of the most prevalent and poten-tially serious forms of nutrient deficiency anaemias in the world [1, (indmedica.com)
  • Iron-deficiency anaemia is one of the direct and indirect causes of maternal mortality and can only be arrested by early detection and management during antenatal visits. (indmedica.com)
  • Complications of iron-deficiency anaemia in pregnancy include, among others, impaired oxygen transport (leading to hypoxia) and abnormal basic cell functions. (indmedica.com)
  • Vegetarians and women with heavy periods are at greater risk of low iron and anaemia, and so screening may be justified. (runnersworld.com)