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  • progenitor
  • A central question is whether the generation of progenitor cells during limb regeneration and mammalian tissue repair occur via separate or overlapping mechanisms. (rupress.org)
  • The embryonic chick can regenerate its retina by transdifferentiation of the retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and by activation of stem/progenitor cells present in the ciliary margin. (biomedcentral.com)
  • proliferation
  • Depolarization caused by V-ATPase loss-of-function results in a drastic reduction of cell proliferation in the bud, a profound mispatterning of neural components, and a failure to regenerate. (biologists.org)
  • The best-known and most widely studied examples of regeneration are those involving epimorphosis, in which the lost structure is reproduced directly by a combination of cell proliferation and redifferentiation of new tissue. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • In amphibians this process is regulated by nerve fibres present at the site of injury, which have been proposed to release factors into the amputated limbs/fins, promoting and sustaining the proliferation of blastemal cells. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Studying the hydrozoan Hydractinia echinata we show that a burst of stem cell proliferation occurs following decapitation, forming a blastema at the oral pole within 24 hr. (elifesciences.org)
  • genes
  • In the study, the researchers constructed a database of all the protein-coding genes from the Japanese fire-bellied newt that had been reported in the Japan newt research community. (phys.org)
  • Rat cells additionally showed the ability to produce and degrade the basement membrane and extracellular matrix components, such as fibronectin, collagen IV, and collagen I. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed significant increases in expression of the fibronectin and matrix metalloprotease-2 (MMP-2) genes after 1 day in culture (p=0.0135 and 0.0128, respectively) and elevated collagen I expression at 7 days (p=0.0016). (regenerativemedicine.net)
  • wound closure
  • Systemic macrophage depletion during this period resulted in wound closure but permanent failure of limb regeneration, associated with extensive fibrosis and disregulation of extracellular matrix component gene expression. (pnas.org)
  • stem cells
  • We therefore propose a link between partially reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells and the half way state of blastema cells and suggest that a common mechanism might be regulating these two processes. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These stem cells then created a bud (known as a blastema) that developed into a new, fully functional head within two days, allowing the animals to capture prey. (elifesciences.org)
  • cells
  • Our genetic fate mapping establishes the role of PAX7 + satellite cells for limb muscle regeneration. (pnas.org)
  • However these factors were not upregulated during regeneration as would be expected if blastema cells acquired pluripotency. (biomedcentral.com)
  • After the loss of an appendage undifferentiated, pluri- or multipotent cells from different origins accumulate at the damaged surface to form a regeneration blastema. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Despite the heterogeneous origin of the blastema cells, histologically they appear as a homogeneous population of cells and therefore have been traditionally viewed as a single cell type. (biomedcentral.com)
  • Some parasitologists prefer the term nurse cell complex or capsule rather than the term cyst, because the term cyst is used for cells of parasite origin. (biomedcentral.com)
  • These substances, whose levels rise with increasing age, appear to inhibit the brain's ability to produce new nerve cells critical to memory and learning. (fightaging.org)
  • The ability to directly control the deposition of regenerative scaffolds with or without the presence of live cells during the surgical process presents an exciting advance not only in the fields of cartilage and bone regeneration but also in other fields where tissue regeneration and replacement are critical. (regenerativemedicine.net)
  • lost
  • In reptiles, chelonians, crocodilians and snakes are unable to regenerate lost parts, but many (not all) kinds of lizards, geckos and iguanas possess regeneration capacity in a high degree. (wikipedia.org)
  • A possible hypothesis for the origin of human cancer is that during the course of evolution, humans lost an advanced regeneration ability as well as the associated control system, resulting in a more permissive environment for cancer development. (jcancer.org)
  • Although all animals are capable of regenerating damaged tissue to some extent, a few-including jellyfish, coral, and their relatives-are able to regenerate entire lost body parts. (elifesciences.org)
  • cell
  • In individuals with albinism, genetic alterations interfere with the melanocytes' production of pigment or their ability to distribute it to keratinocytes, the major cell type of the skin's outer layer. (blogspot.com)
  • We analysed expression levels of the most commonly used pluripotency associated factors in regenerating and non-regenerating tissue and compared them with levels in a pluripotent reference cell. (biomedcentral.com)