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  • 1963
  • In addition there are photocopies of a speech (1950s) to a U.S. Congressional Committee concerning tuberculosis in the Montana Native American population, and of a memorial (1963) to Charles Nelson Pray, both of which were written by John C. Harrison. (oclc.org)
  • Native Americans
  • In some years, separate censuses of Native Americans were taken by the federal government and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. (ancestry.com)
  • The 1860 and 1870 federal censuses noted only Native Americans living in non-Native American households. (ancestry.com)
  • It is safe to say that those enumerations of Native Americans made before 1880 are incomplete and frequently inaccurate. (ancestry.com)
  • In 1880 , a special enumeration was taken of Native Americans living near military reservations in the Dakota and Washington territories and the state of California. (ancestry.com)
  • There is no master name index to the Native Americans themselves. (ancestry.com)
  • In this capacity Hrdlička conducted four intensive surveys among the Native Americans of the southwestern U.S. and northern Mexico between 1899 and 1902. (encyclopedia.com)
  • In addition, many Native Americans living on reservations are also prone to mental disorders, such as depression, substance abuse, and suicide. (schadone.com)
  • Native Americans certainly have it tough, and though many are able to find their way within and without the majority culture, whether through acculturation or community-wide boons such as gaming and resource development, many falter. (schadone.com)
  • The fact that Native Americans are genetically prone to alcoholism, are sociologically prone to depression, and are overall prone to health disparities, suicide, and homicide reveals that there needs to be a solid and comprehensive approach to their problems. (schadone.com)
  • First, examining the cultural and genetic aspects of Native Americans in the context of substance abuse allows me to educate myself on cultural specifics that may assist me in treating a Native American patient. (schadone.com)
  • In 1811, as he traveled south to recruit more allies, his brother Tenskwatawa initiated the Battle of Tippecanoe against William Henry Harrison 's army, but the Native Americans retreated from the field and the European Americans burned Prophetstown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Within a few years, the remaining tribal lands in the Old Northwest were ceded to the U.S. government and subsequently opened for new settlement and most of the Native Americans eventually moved west, across the Mississippi River. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Crow , called the Apsáalooke in their own Siouan language , or variants including the Absaroka, are Native Americans , who in historical times lived in the Yellowstone River valley, which extends from present-day Wyoming , through Montana and into North Dakota , where it joins the Missouri River. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1937
  • Even in the twenty-first century, nearly ninety years after his work first appeared in print, Steinbeck's novels, stories, and plays still generate controversy: his 1937 book Of Mice and Men was banned in some Mississippi schools in 2002, and as recently as 2009, he made the American Library Association's annual list of most frequently challenged authors. (jhu.edu)
  • 1926
  • He was elected to membership in the American Philosophical Society in 1918 and in the National Academy of Sciences in 1921 and served as president of the American Anthropological Association (1925-1926), the Washington Academy of Science (1928-1929), and the American Association of Physical Anthropologists (1930-1932). (encyclopedia.com)
  • Cadzow, Donald A. "Bark Records of the Bungi Midewin Society," Indian Notes , 3 (1926), pp. 123-134. (umn.edu)
  • 1924
  • He used the 1924 Racial Integrity Act to classify Virginia Indians and mixed-race individuals as "colored," and therefore denied basic civil rights under Virginia's system of segregation. (melungeon.org)
  • Command
  • At 6 a.m. on this day in 1778, Mohawk Indian chief and British Loyalist leader Joseph Brant leads a force of 150 Iroquois Indians and 300 British Loyalists under the command of Captain William Caldwell in a surprise attack on the area of German Flats, New York . (history.com)
  • tribal
  • City buildings and automobile traffic on the roads of an Arizona city contrasts with rural native American Indian tribal life. (criticalpast.com)
  • The Tribal Reorganization ofthe Stockbridge-Munsee: Essential Conditions in the Re-Creation of a Native American Community, 1930-1942 By John C. Sava^an T4E Stockbridge-Munsee Com¬ munity is a small rural village of about 700 people located in Shawano County, Wisconsin. (wisconsinhistory.org)
  • The Tribal Reorganization of the Stockbridge-Munsee: Essential Conditions in the Re-Creation of a Native American Community, 1930-1942: Author John C. Savagian examines the Stockbridge-Munsee Indian community of Shawano County during the Great Depression, focusing on their effort to obtain government funding and official recognition. (wisconsinhistory.org)
  • March 1768 - October 5, 1813) was a Native American Shawnee warrior and chief, who became the primary leader of a large, multi-tribal confederacy in the early 19th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • The name Blackfoot reportedly derived from the black-dyed moccasins worn by some tribal members at the time of early contact with non-Indians. (encyclopedia.com)
  • origin
  • We have in some of the counties of southwestern Virginia a number of so-called Melungeons who came into that section from Newman's Ridge, Hancock County, Tennessee, and who are classified by us as of negro origin though they make various claims, such as Portuguese, Indians, etc. (melungeon.org)
  • There are a few claimants to relationships with the Core Indians and the Croatan of Robeson County undoubtedly have some Indian components, but within the compass of our Banks study there is none that may be recognized as of Indian origin. (ncgenweb.us)
  • Dakota
  • He moved to North Dakota seven years later and was the superintendent of the Standing Rock reservation at Fort Yates, North Dakota. (montana.edu)
  • After recovering from a heart attack in 1956, he became the superintendent of the Indian School at Wahpeton, North Dakota, where he stayed until he retired in 1972. (montana.edu)
  • [ page needed ] Later the people moved to the Devil's Lake region of North Dakota before the Crow split from the Hidatsa and moved westward. (wikipedia.org)
  • This panel pouch was collected between 1890-1933 by Charles Alexander Eastman, 1858-1939, a Santee Dakota man. (harvard.edu)
  • lands
  • Following the American Revolution, though supportive of the Colonies in both blood and spirit, these "Stockbridge" Indians were evicted from their lands. (wisconsinhistory.org)
  • Time after time the Stockbridge settled on lands nego¬ tiated in good faith, worked hard to im¬ prove them, only to be forced out by covet¬ ous whites or other bands of Indians. (wisconsinhistory.org)
  • The federal government called upon the Army to explore boundaries and possible railroad routes in the new lands and to confront Indian and Mormon challenges to its authority. (army.mil)
  • He was also ambitious, willing to take risks, and make significant sacrifices to repel the Americans from Native American lands in the Old Northwest Territory . (wikipedia.org)
  • Cattle
  • The Indian and Loyalist raiders captured hundreds of head of cattle and sheep before setting fire to every house, barn and mill in German Flats. (history.com)
  • years
  • These include the names of all children between six and eighteen years of age, and their sex, tribe, degree of Native American blood, distance from home to the school, parent or guardian, and attendance during the year. (ancestry.com)
  • Featuring contemporaneous and present-day interpretations of his novels and essays by historians, literary scholars, and political theorists, this book covers the spectrum of Steinbeck's writing, exploring everything from his place in American political culture to his seeming betrayal of his leftist principles in later years. (jhu.edu)
  • The end of the Tsimshian as a force to be reckoned with in the north came in 1860, when smallpox annihilated 80 percent of the entire Tsimshian population in only three years. (newworldencyclopedia.org)
  • 1990
  • The growing acceptance of childhood as a distinct phenomenon is reflected in the proposed inclusion of the syndrome in the upcoming Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, or DSM-IV, of the American Psychiatric Association (1990). (cyc-net.org)
  • colonial
  • But rather than being formed by the slow accu¬ mulation of disparate immigrant groups who chose to settle in the ("utover to escape crowded cities, or to farm as their ancestors did, the Stockbridge-Munsee Community is the end result of a long and at times torturous jommey of a band of principally Mahican Indians from the colonial fron¬ tiers of western Massachusetts. (wisconsinhistory.org)
  • His older sister Mary was founding father Sir William Johnson's common-law wife and played a significant role in colonial and revolutionary Indian affairs. (history.com)
  • 1890's
  • When Nashville writer Will Allen Dromgoole asked two Tennessee legislators of the 1890's to define "Malungeons," the answers were "a dirty Indian sneak" and "a Portuguese nigger. (melungeon.org)
  • The following are the wars that involved American Indians occurring between 1783 and the 1890's. (familysearch.org)
  • customs
  • A View of the Character, Manners, and Customs of the North-Americans: Comprehending an Accountof the Northern Indians, of the Inhabitants of Oonalashka and Nootka Sound, of the Five Indian Nations of Canada, of the Inhabitants of the United States, &c. (upenn.edu)
  • Calkins, Hiram, 1855, "Indian Nomenclature of Northern Wisconsin, With A Sketch of the Manners and Customs of the Chippewas," Wisconsin State Historical Society Annual Reports and Collections , 1:119-126 (reprinted). (umn.edu)
  • missionary
  • With that goal in mind, the Mohegan Church was founded in 1831 with the help of Sarah Huntington, a local non-Indian missionary who supported the church's fund-raising efforts and was successful in the campaign against removal. (encyclopedia.com)
  • area
  • The one arrow-shaft smoother or polisher found in the area was at Northwest Point on Roanoke Island, presumed site of the Roanoac Indian village! (ncgenweb.us)
  • Ace Powell & Morris Blake, painters and photographers from Hungry Horse, are spending a few days in this area in quest of suitable subjects depicting the tue Old Time Blackfeet Indian and the modern Indian of today. (blogspot.com)
  • Perspectives
  • Angel, Michael R. Discordant Voices, Conflicting Values: Ojibwa and Euro-American Perspectives on the Midewiwin . (umn.edu)
  • page
  • Flannery (1939) has attempted a trait study of the Algonkians' material culture and social (Page 13) data. (ncgenweb.us)
  • threat
  • Occum's sister, Lucy Occum Tantaquidgeon, encouraged her daughter, Lucy Teecomwas, and granddaughter, Cynthia Hoscott, to avoid the threat of federal Indian removal policy by proving that the Mohegan Tribe was already "Christianized" and "civilized. (encyclopedia.com)
  • The threat of Indian ambush isolated some posts, making it essentially impossible to send a surgeon in time of emergency to a post otherwise without medical attendance. (army.mil)
  • subject
  • DYABOLA is a international, subject download becoming african americans black and architecture reference debt published with a gypten und, a governor president and a century geography. (protostarsat.com)
  • Among the subject files are a large group of files on bears of North America and files on geographical distribution and the development of Dr. Merriam's Life Zone Theory. (cdlib.org)
  • traditionally
  • Tobacco pouches were traditionally worn and used by many Native American peoples as a way to carry tobacco, small tools, pigments, and other important small personal goods. (harvard.edu)
  • Montana
  • Indians of North America--Health and hygiene--Montana. (oclc.org)
  • He returned to education from 1938 to 1939 teaching vocational agriculture and coaching at Broadwater County High School in Townsend, Montana. (montana.edu)
  • The Northern Blackfoot live farthest north, the Blood and North Piegan in the middle just north of the Canadian border, and the South Piegan furthest south along the eastern edge of the Rocky Mountains in northern Montana. (encyclopedia.com)
  • woods
  • Bickham , Angela A. Father wasn't de onlies' one hidin' in de woods: The many images of maroons throughout the American South. (wm.edu)
  • North Woods , 7:33:13-15. (umn.edu)