Remote Consultation: Consultation via remote telecommunications, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or treatment of a patient at a site remote from the patient or primary physician.Referral and Consultation: The practice of sending a patient to another program or practitioner for services or advice which the referring source is not prepared to provide.Ethics Consultation: Services provided by an individual ethicist (ETHICISTS) or an ethics team or committee (ETHICS COMMITTEES, CLINICAL) to address the ethical issues involved in a specific clinical case. The central purpose is to improve the process and outcomes of patients' care by helping to identify, analyze, and resolve ethical problems.Family Practice: A medical specialty concerned with the provision of continuing, comprehensive primary health care for the entire family.Physician-Patient Relations: The interactions between physician and patient.Patient Satisfaction: The degree to which the individual regards the health care service or product or the manner in which it is delivered by the provider as useful, effective, or beneficial.Appointments and Schedules: The different methods of scheduling patient visits, appointment systems, individual or group appointments, waiting times, waiting lists for hospitals, walk-in clinics, etc.Communication: The exchange or transmission of ideas, attitudes, or beliefs between individuals or groups.Primary Health Care: Care which provides integrated, accessible health care services by clinicians who are accountable for addressing a large majority of personal health care needs, developing a sustained partnership with patients, and practicing in the context of family and community. (JAMA 1995;273(3):192)General Practice: Patient-based medical care provided across age and gender or specialty boundaries.Patient Acceptance of Health Care: The seeking and acceptance by patients of health service.Office Visits: Visits made by patients to health service providers' offices for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up.Tape Recording: Recording of information on magnetic or punched paper tape.Ethicists: Persons trained in philosophical or theological ethics who work in clinical, research, public policy, or other settings where they bring their expertise to bear on the analysis of ethical dilemmas in policies or cases. (Bioethics Thesaurus)EnglandQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.Great BritainAttitude of Health Personnel: Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.Physicians, Family: Those physicians who have completed the education requirements specified by the American Academy of Family Physicians.Patient Participation: Patient involvement in the decision-making process in matters pertaining to health.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Physician's Practice Patterns: Patterns of practice related to diagnosis and treatment as especially influenced by cost of the service requested and provided.Videotape Recording: Recording of visual and sometimes sound signals on magnetic tape.General Practitioners: Physicians whose practice is not restricted to a specific field of MEDICINE.Medical History Taking: Acquiring information from a patient on past medical conditions and treatments.ScotlandTelepathology: Transmission and interpretation of tissue specimens via remote telecommunication, generally for the purpose of diagnosis or consultation but may also be used for continuing education.Netherlands: Country located in EUROPE. It is bordered by the NORTH SEA, BELGIUM, and GERMANY. Constituent areas are Aruba, Curacao, Sint Maarten, formerly included in the NETHERLANDS ANTILLES.Professional Practice: The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.Dermatology: A medical specialty concerned with the skin, its structure, functions, diseases, and treatment.Ethics, Clinical: The identification, analysis, and resolution of moral problems that arise in the care of patients. (Bioethics Thesaurus)Clinical Competence: The capability to perform acceptably those duties directly related to patient care.Outpatient Clinics, Hospital: Organized services in a hospital which provide medical care on an outpatient basis.Quality of Health Care: The levels of excellence which characterize the health service or health care provided based on accepted standards of quality.Qualitative Research: Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)Telemedicine: Delivery of health services via remote telecommunications. This includes interactive consultative and diagnostic services.Video Recording: The storing or preserving of video signals for television to be played back later via a transmitter or receiver. Recordings may be made on magnetic tape or discs (VIDEODISC RECORDING).Process Assessment (Health Care): An evaluation procedure that focuses on how care is delivered, based on the premise that there are standards of performance for activities undertaken in delivering patient care, in which the specific actions taken, events occurring, and human interactions are compared with accepted standards.Patient Simulation: The use of persons coached to feign symptoms or conditions of real diseases in a life-like manner in order to teach or evaluate medical personnel.LondonAfter-Hours Care: Medical care provided after the regular practice schedule of the physicians. Usually it is designed to deliver 24-hour-a-day and 365-day-a-year patient care coverage for emergencies, triage, pediatric care, or hospice care.Consultants: Individuals referred to for expert or professional advice or services.Patient Education as Topic: The teaching or training of patients concerning their own health needs.Workload: The total amount of work to be performed by an individual, a department, or other group of workers in a period of time.Decision Making: The process of making a selective intellectual judgment when presented with several complex alternatives consisting of several variables, and usually defining a course of action or an idea.Nurse Practitioners: Nurses who are specially trained to assume an expanded role in providing medical care under the supervision of a physician.Time Factors: Elements of limited time intervals, contributing to particular results or situations.Attitude to Health: Public attitudes toward health, disease, and the medical care system.Heart Defects, Congenital: Developmental abnormalities involving structures of the heart. These defects are present at birth but may be discovered later in life.Videoconferencing: Communications via an interactive conference between two or more participants at different sites, using computer networks (COMPUTER COMMUNICATION NETWORKS) or other telecommunication links to transmit audio, video, and data.Echocardiography: Ultrasonic recording of the size, motion, and composition of the heart and surrounding tissues. The standard approach is transthoracic.Microwaves: That portion of the electromagnetic spectrum from the UHF (ultrahigh frequency) radio waves and extending into the INFRARED RAYS frequencies.Heart: The hollow, muscular organ that maintains the circulation of the blood.