The expected function of a member of a particular profession.
Reorganization of the hospital corporate structure.
Analysis of word concepts by the association of polar adjectives, e.g., good-bad, with the concept, father. The adjectives are usually scaled in 7 steps. The subject's placement of the concept on the adjectival scale indicates the connotative meaning of the concept.
The expected function of a member of the medical profession.
The expected and characteristic pattern of behavior exhibited by an individual as a member of a particular social group.
The reciprocal interaction of two or more professional individuals.
Attitudes of personnel toward their patients, other professionals, toward the medical care system, etc.
Those persons legally qualified by education and training to engage in the practice of pharmacy.
Any type of research that employs nonnumeric information to explore individual or group characteristics, producing findings not arrived at by statistical procedures or other quantitative means. (Qualitative Inquiry: A Dictionary of Terms Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 1997)
A method of data collection and a QUALITATIVE RESEARCH tool in which a small group of individuals are brought together and allowed to interact in a discussion of their opinions about topics, issues, or questions.
Conversations with an individual or individuals held in order to obtain information about their background and other personal biographical data, their attitudes and opinions, etc. It includes school admission or job interviews.
The capability to perform the duties of one's profession generally, or to perform a particular professional task, with skill of an acceptable quality.
Men and women working in the provision of health services, whether as individual practitioners or employees of health institutions and programs, whether or not professionally trained, and whether or not subject to public regulation. (From A Discursive Dictionary of Health Care, 1976)
The principles of proper conduct concerning the rights and duties of the professional, relations with patients or consumers and fellow practitioners, as well as actions of the professional and interpersonal relations with patient or consumer families. (From Stedman, 25th ed)
Formal education and training in preparation for the practice of a profession.
The use of one's knowledge in a particular profession. It includes, in the case of the field of biomedicine, professional activities related to health care and the actual performance of the duties related to the provision of health care.
The quality or state of being independent and self-directing, especially in making decisions, enabling professionals to exercise judgment as they see fit during the performance of their jobs.
Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.
Individual members of North American ethnic groups with ancient historic ancestral origins in Asia.
A division of the UNITED STATES PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE that is responsible for the public health and the provision of medical services to NATIVE AMERICANS in the United States, primarily those residing on reservation lands.
Inuktitut-speakers generally associated with the northern polar region.
The level of governmental organization and function at the national or country-wide level.
Providing for the full range of personal health services for diagnosis, treatment, follow-up and rehabilitation of patients.
Brief therapeutic approach which is ameliorative rather than curative of acute psychiatric emergencies. Used in contexts such as emergency rooms of psychiatric or general hospitals, or in the home or place of crisis occurrence, this treatment approach focuses on interpersonal and intrapsychic factors and environmental modification. (APA Thesaurus of Psychological Index Terms, 7th ed)
Skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It assists in the development of skills needed for independent living.
Organized services to provide mental health care.
The state wherein the person is well adjusted.
Psychiatric illness or diseases manifested by breakdowns in the adaptational process expressed primarily as abnormalities of thought, feeling, and behavior producing either distress or impairment of function.
Use of all social work processes in the treatment of patients in a psychiatric or mental health setting.
Legal process required for the institutionalization of a patient with severe mental problems.
A dental specialty concerned with the prevention and correction of dental and oral anomalies (malocclusion).
A surgical specialty which utilizes medical, surgical, and physical methods to treat and correct deformities, diseases, and injuries to the skeletal system, its articulations, and associated structures.
Organizations which certify physicians and dentists as specialists in various fields of medical and dental practice.
A publication issued at stated, more or less regular, intervals.
Compliance with a set of standards defined by non-governmental organizations. Certification is applied for by individuals on a voluntary basis and represents a professional status when achieved, e.g., certification for a medical specialty.
Special hospitals which provide care to the mentally ill patient.
An acquired organic mental disorder with loss of intellectual abilities of sufficient severity to interfere with social or occupational functioning. The dysfunction is multifaceted and involves memory, behavior, personality, judgment, attention, spatial relations, language, abstract thought, and other executive functions. The intellectual decline is usually progressive, and initially spares the level of consciousness.
Institutional health care of patients during the day. The patients return home at night.
Facilities or services which are especially devoted to providing palliative and supportive care to the patient with a terminal illness and to the patient's family.
Groups of persons whose range of options is severely limited, who are frequently subjected to COERCION in their DECISION MAKING, or who may be compromised in their ability to give INFORMED CONSENT.
Individuals licensed to practice DENTISTRY.
Personnel who provide dental service to patients in an organized facility, institution or agency.
The optimal state of the mouth and normal functioning of the organs of the mouth without evidence of disease.
The total of dental diagnostic, preventive, and restorative services provided to meet the needs of a patient (from Illustrated Dictionary of Dentistry, 1982).
Medical specialty concerned with environmental factors that may impinge upon human disease, and development of methods for the detection, prevention, and control of environmentally related disease.
Hearing loss due to exposure to explosive loud noise or chronic exposure to sound level greater than 85 dB. The hearing loss is often in the frequency range 4000-6000 hertz.
Medical specialty concerned with the promotion and maintenance of the physical and mental health of employees in occupational settings.
Noise present in occupational, industrial, and factory situations.
Personal devices for protection of the ears from loud or high intensity noise, water, or cold. These include earmuffs and earplugs.
The testing of the acuity of the sense of hearing to determine the thresholds of the lowest intensity levels at which an individual can hear a set of tones. The frequencies between 125 and 8000 Hz are used to test air conduction thresholds and the frequencies between 250 and 4000 Hz are used to test bone conduction thresholds.
A general term for the complete or partial loss of the ability to hear from one or both ears.