PostcardsCorrespondence as Topic: Communication between persons or between institutions or organizations by an exchange of letters. Its use in indexing and cataloging will generally figure in historical and biographical material.Postal Service: The functions and activities carried out by the U.S. Postal Service, foreign postal services, and private postal services such as Federal Express.Reminder Systems: Systems used to prompt or aid the memory. The systems can be computerized reminders, color coding, telephone calls, or devices such as letters and postcards.Persia: An ancient civilization, known as early as 2000 B.C. The Persian Empire was founded by Cyrus the Great (550-529 B.C.) and for 200 years, from 550 to 331 B.C., the Persians ruled the ancient world from India to Egypt. The territory west of India was called Persis by the Greeks who later called the entire empire Persia. In 331 B.C. the Persian wars against the Greeks ended disastrously under the counterattacks by Alexander the Great. The name Persia in modern times for the modern country was changed to Iran in 1935. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p546 & Asimov, Words on the Map, 1962, p176)Hospital Design and Construction: The architecture, functional design, and construction of hospitals.Self-Injurious Behavior: Behavior in which persons hurt or harm themselves without the motive of suicide or of sexual deviation.Diagnosis, Oral: Examination of the mouth and teeth toward the identification and diagnosis of intraoral disease or manifestation of non-oral conditions.Poisoning: A condition or physical state produced by the ingestion, injection, inhalation of or exposure to a deleterious agent.New South Wales: A state in southeastern Australia. Its capital is Sydney. It was discovered by Captain Cook in 1770 and first settled at Botany Bay by marines and convicts in 1788. It was named by Captain Cook who thought its coastline resembled that of South Wales. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p840 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p377)WashingtonPhotography: Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.Telephone: An instrument for reproducing sounds especially articulate speech at a distance. (Webster, 3rd ed)Suicide, Attempted: The unsuccessful attempt to kill oneself.History, 20th Century: Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.Research Design: A plan for collecting and utilizing data so that desired information can be obtained with sufficient precision or so that an hypothesis can be tested properly.Australia: The smallest continent and an independent country, comprising six states and two territories. Its capital is Canberra.Recurrence: The return of a sign, symptom, or disease after a remission.ItalyJapanQuestionnaires: Predetermined sets of questions used to collect data - clinical data, social status, occupational group, etc. The term is often applied to a self-completed survey instrument.ArgentinaResearch Personnel: Those individuals engaged in research.Social Discrimination: Group behavior toward others by virtue of their group membership.Trust: Confidence in or reliance on a person or thing.Biomedical Research: Research that involves the application of the natural sciences, especially biology and physiology, to medicine.KentuckyHolidays: Days commemorating events. Holidays also include vacation periods.New Zealand: A group of islands in the southwest Pacific. Its capital is Wellington. It was discovered by the Dutch explorer Abel Tasman in 1642 and circumnavigated by Cook in 1769. Colonized in 1840 by the New Zealand Company, it became a British crown colony in 1840 until 1907 when colonial status was terminated. New Zealand is a partly anglicized form of the original Dutch name Nieuw Zeeland, new sea land, possibly with reference to the Dutch province of Zeeland. (From Webster's New Geographical Dictionary, 1988, p842 & Room, Brewer's Dictionary of Names, 1992, p378)Anniversaries and Special Events: Occasions to commemorate an event or occasions designated for a specific purpose.Plum Pox Virus: A species of the genus POTYVIRUS that affects many species of Prunus. It is transmitted by aphids and by infected rootstocks.Chromatography, Reverse-Phase: A chromatography technique in which the stationary phase is composed of a non-polar substance with a polar mobile phase, in contrast to normal-phase chromatography in which the stationary phase is a polar substance with a non-polar mobile phase.PrintingFamous PersonsSmell: The ability to detect scents or odors, such as the function of OLFACTORY RECEPTOR NEURONS.VermontFagaceae: A plant family of the order Fagales subclass Hamamelidae, class Magnoliopsida.China: A country spanning from central Asia to the Pacific Ocean.Ascomycota: A phylum of fungi which have cross-walls or septa in the mycelium. The perfect state is characterized by the formation of a saclike cell (ascus) containing ascospores. Most pathogenic fungi with a known perfect state belong to this phylum.Wine: Fermented juice of fresh grapes or of other fruit or plant products used as a beverage.EnglandFood: Any substances taken in by the body that provide nourishment.Color: The visually perceived property of objects created by absorption or reflection of specific wavelengths of light.ReadingTexasMaps as Topic: Representations, normally to scale and on a flat medium, of a selection of material or abstract features on the surface of the earth, the heavens, or celestial bodies.History, 21st Century: Time period from 2001 through 2100 of the common era.Ixodidae: A family of hardbacked TICKS, in the subclass ACARI. Genera include DERMACENTOR and IXODES among others.Politics: Activities concerned with governmental policies, functions, etc.Dehumanization: The process by which a person or group of persons comes to be regarded or treated as lacking in human qualities.Diabetes Mellitus: A heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by HYPERGLYCEMIA and GLUCOSE INTOLERANCE.