A disorder beginning in childhood. It is marked by the presence of markedly abnormal or impaired development in social interaction and communication and a markedly restricted repertoire of activity and interest. Manifestations of the disorder vary greatly depending on the developmental level and chronological age of the individual. (DSM-V)
A dimension of auditory sensation varying with cycles per second of the sound stimulus.
The ability to differentiate tones.
Sound that expresses emotion through rhythm, melody, and harmony.
Severe distortions in the development of many basic psychological functions that are not normal for any stage in development. These distortions are manifested in sustained social impairment, speech abnormalities, and peculiar motor movements.
Electronic hearing devices typically used for patients with normal outer and middle ear function, but defective inner ear function. In the COCHLEA, the hair cells (HAIR CELLS, VESTIBULAR) may be absent or damaged but there are residual nerve fibers. The device electrically stimulates the COCHLEAR NERVE to create sound sensation.
Use of sound to elicit a response in the nervous system.
Sensitivity or attachment to religious values, or to things of the spirit as opposed to material or worldly interests. (from Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary, 10th ed, and Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd ed)
Transmission of live or pre-recorded audio or video content via connection or download from the INTERNET.
Time period from 1901 through 2000 of the common era.
Individuals enrolled in a school of nursing or a formal educational program leading to a degree in nursing.
Amputation of a lower limb through the sacroiliac joint.
The interrelationship of psychology and religion.
The interrelationship of medicine and religion.
The sciences dealing with processes observable in nature.
A psychologic theory, developed by John Broadus Watson, concerned with studying and measuring behaviors that are observable.
The observable response of a man or animal to a situation.
Disciplines concerned with the study of human and animal behavior.
Books used in the study of a subject that contain a systematic presentation of the principles and vocabulary of a subject.
Acquired or developmental cognitive disorders of AUDITORY PERCEPTION characterized by a reduced ability to perceive information contained in auditory stimuli despite intact auditory pathways. Affected individuals have difficulty with speech perception, sound localization, and comprehending the meaning of inflections of speech.
The bestowing of tangible or intangible benefits, voluntarily and usually without expectation of anything in return. However, gift giving may be motivated by feelings of ALTRUISM or gratitude, by a sense of obligation, or by the hope of receiving something in return.
The process whereby auditory stimuli are selected, organized, and interpreted by the organism.
Characteristics or attributes of persons or things which elicit pleasurable feelings.
The anterior portion of the head that includes the skin, muscles, and structures of the forehead, eyes, nose, mouth, cheeks, and jaw.
The branch of philosophy dealing with the nature of the beautiful. It includes beauty, esthetic experience, esthetic judgment, esthetic aspects of medicine, etc.
Skills, techniques, standards, and principles used to improve the art and symmetry of the teeth and face to improve the appearance as well as the function of the teeth, mouth, and face. (From Boucher's Clinical Dental Terminology, 4th ed, p108)
Method of making images on a sensitized surface by exposure to light or other radiant energy.
The process of discovering or asserting an objective or intrinsic relation between two objects or concepts; a faculty or power that enables a person to make judgments; the process of bringing to light and asserting the implicit meaning of a concept; a critical evaluation of a person or situation.
Male-associated sex-specific social roles and behaviors unrelated to biologic function.